Bible kevinroosecomThe three-year Lectionary that many Catholics and Protestants hear in public worship gives us a great variety of Holy Scripture.

Yet, it doesn’t tell the whole story.

My series Forbidden Bible Verses — ones the Lectionary editors and their clergy omit — examines the passages we do not hear in church. These missing verses are also Essential Bible Verses, ones we should study with care and attention. Often, we find that they carry difficult messages and warnings.

Today’s reading is from the English Standard Version with commentary by Matthew Henry and John MacArthur.

Matthew 7:1-6

Judging Others

7 “Judge not, that you be not judged. 2 For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.

“Do not give dogs what is holy, and do not throw your pearls before pigs, lest they trample them underfoot and turn to attack you.

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Matthew 7 is the third and final chapter containing the text of the Sermon on the Mount.

It opens with our Lord’s instruction not to judge others, because we, too, can be judged — accused — of various faults (verse 1). The vehemence with which we judge others will be applied to us in this life and the next (verse 2).

Sadly, too many ‘judges’ really do think they are blameless. In reality, they have many faults but are in denial. Some of them appear to be sociopaths or narcissists.

So, then, how are we to judge? Jesus said (John 7:24, another Forbidden Bible Verse):

Do not judge by appearances, but judge with right judgment.

In that instance, He was criticising the Pharisees who made superficial and wrong judgements. In Luke 16:15, yet another Forbidden Bible Verse, we read:

And he said to them, “You are those who justify yourselves before men, but God knows your hearts. For what is exalted among men is an abomination in the sight of God.

Sometimes we do the same when we judge hastily on appearances or speech alone. May we be charitable and discerning with others.

Before we judge with righteousness, we are to examine and rectify our own faults first (verses 3, 4), lest we act in a hypocritical manner (verse 5). Matthew Henry explains (emphases mine):

I must first reform myself, that I may thereby help to reform my brother, and may qualify myself to reprove him. Note, Those who blame others, ought to be blameless and harmless themselves. Those who are reprovers in the gate, reprovers by office, magistrates and ministers, are concerned to walk circumspectly, and to be very regular in their conversation: an elder must have a good report, 1 Timothy 3:2,7. The snuffers of the sanctuary were to be of pure gold.

In verse 6, Jesus tells us to use discretion when evangelising, informally or formally, lest it makes people hostile to the Gospel, the Church — and us. Henry says:

This may be considered, either, (1.) As a rule to the disciples in preaching the gospel not that they must not preach it to any one who were wicked and profane (Christ himself preached to publicans and sinners), but the reference is to such as they found obstinate after the gospel was preached to them, such as blasphemed it, and persecuted the preachers of it let them not spend much time among such, for it would be lost labour, but let them turn to others, Acts 13:41. So Dr. Whitby. Or, (2.) As a rule to all in giving reproof. Our zeal against sin must be guided by discretion, and we must not go about to give instructions, counsels, and rebukes, much less comforts, to hardened scorners, to whom it will certainly do no good, but who will be exasperated and enraged at us. Throw a pearl to a swine, and he will resent it, as if you threw a stone at him reproofs will be called reproaches, as they were (Luke 11:45; Jeremiah 6:10), therefore give not to dogs and swine (unclean creatures) holy things.

Note that our Lord never preached to Herod Antipas. Paul stopped preaching to the Jews after they blasphemed and ridiculed him in Acts 18. He told them he would focus on preaching to the Gentiles instead.

John MacArthur explains:

This is a tremendous truth, people. We have to learn in our ministry to be discriminating. You don’t say everything to everybody. Paul even said to the Corinthians, “I could not speak unto you certain things because you were carnal. I wouldn’t waste them on your misunderstandings. I wouldn’t waste them on your sinfulness.” Jesus to His disciples could only reveal certain things, and He had to hide other things. And to the world it says, “And He hid them from them and revealed other things unto the babes.” Jesus didn’t say everything to everybody. When Jesus rose from the dead He never one time appeared to an unbeliever. Never once.

In closing, we know the Old Testament’s injunctions against swine. However, MacArthur describes the status of dogs in Jesus’s time:

Dogs in those days were not the little nice smelling, painted nails, rhinestone collars, funny little sweater things that flip flop around the houses today. They were not the little lap dog, pet dog things that we spend a fortune on and all. Dogs in those days, apart from the dogs that worked with the flocks, and, of course, in Job it talks about the dog of the flocks, it would be a trained dog that worked with the sheep, but the dogs in the cities were a mongrel, ugly big bunch of dogs that scavenged around the city and ate the garbage, and they were a horrible, ugly bunch of wild dogs.

The Jews believed them to be filthy. The Old Testament talks about that. Unclean. The Psalms say they threaten, they howl, they snarl, they are a greedy, shameless group. They are called contemptible in I Samuel. Dogs were an ugly kind of a being. They weren’t anything like we have today, except for those that worked with the sheep. They would be pariahs, savage, mongrels. Lived in the garbage heaps. And holy things were not to be thrown to the dogs.

Final word: I’m surprised that these verses are not in the three-year Lectionary. (It is in the two-year one.) A clergyperson could get a number of sermons out of this passage which would be most helpful to many churchgoers.

Next time: Matthew 7:7-11

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