John F MacArthurIn his sermon on Matthew 8:1-4, which I referred to in yesterday’s post, John MacArthur helpfully explains the structure of St Matthew’s Gospel, designed to show us the deity of Christ Jesus.

Excerpts follow, emphases mine:

First chapter: genealogy.  That attested to the legal qualifications of the Messiah.  Second chapter: birth, and all of the fulfillment of prophecy attested to the prophetic qualifications of the Messiah.  And then you come to His baptism: attested to the divine approval of His messiahshipThen you come to the temptation: attested to His spiritual qualifications to be the Messiah.  Then you come to the sermon [on the Mount]: His theological qualifications. And now you come to the miracles, the most essential qualification of all, the proof that He is God.  He’s God.

By the way, chapter 8 begins where chapter 4 left off; the sermon is stuck in the middle. But when we closed chapter 4, do you remember what He was doing? Verse 23?  “And Jesus went all about Galilee, teaching in the synagogues and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people.  And His fame went throughout all Syria.  And they brought unto Him all the sick people that were taken with divers diseases and torments, and those who were possessed with demons, those who were epileptic, those who had paralysis, and He healed them.  And there followed Him great multitudes of people from Galilee and Decapolis and Jerusalem and Judea and beyond the Jordan.”  You see, this is right where He left off, isn’t it?  He went up in a mountain, preached a sermon, came down, and started it all over again.  Thousands, uncounted numbers of healings, and He healed all who came to Him.

The first miracle recorded in Matthew’s Gospel is the healing of the leper. MacArthur describes the pattern of miracles in Matthew 8 and 9 and the narrative through Matthew 13:

The 8th chapter through the 12th chapter is really, in many ways, critical to the understanding of the life of Christ and the message of Matthew.  For in this section, Matthew records a series of miracles performed by Jesus Christ.  There are countless thousands of miracles that are done, nine of which he singles out as examples of the power of Jesus Christ. They are really His credentials as the Messiah.  They are those signs which point convincingly to His deity, for only God can do the things that He does.  The sad part is that, after the miracles in chapters 8 and 9, after the preaching that occurs following that, the Jews conclude in chapter 12 that Jesus is of the devil. That was their conclusion.  So in many ways this becomes the heart of Matthew’s message.  Christ does everything possible to manifest His deity, and they conclude exactly the opposite. And then in chapter 13, He turns from the Jews toward the establishment of a Gentile church.  This is a monumental section of Scripture.  Now you’ll notice that it begins with three miracles:  miracle of healing the leper in the first four verses; healing the man with paralysis, verses 5 to 13; and the woman with fever in verses 14 and 15.  This is the opening triad of miracles.  There are nine miracles in these two chapters.  They come in three sections of three:  three miracles, then a response; three miracles, then a response; three miracles, then a response; all designed to manifest the deity of Jesus Christ.

Miracles, you see, were God’s way of attesting to the deity of His Son.  They are creative miracles.  They manifest power that is only defined by the essence of God.  They are things that man could never do.  They are supernatural. 

I will continue to write about the miracles in Matthew 8 as they have been omitted from the three-year Lectionary, widely in use for public worship.

However, understanding more about how Matthew structured his Gospel will help those of us new to the Bible to better understand and appreciate it.

Advertisements