https://a.thumbs.redditmedia.com/VSxB-oFgeCCNvj31vHSzz1JgIMSuVrhBBse5u37uCp8.pngToday, let’s look at the lighter side of Christmas.

The Trump as Santa image comes from one of his fans at The_Donald.

It has a lot of clever detail. Ted Cruz is the elf on the outside looking in. Below Cruz’s picture are images of Trump’s unofficial campaign mascots, Harambe the Gorilla and Pepe the Frog. Hillary is in the snowball on his desk. On the opposite side is Trump’s favourite beverage, Diet Coke. Slightly to the right of that is the little red Trump Train. One of the balls on the tree has Jeff Sessions’s picture (second from the top), and another Ben Carson’s (bottom). Santa Trump’s list has Rosie O’Donnell‘s and Megyn Kelly‘s names on the Naughty side. Mike Pence and Carrier made the Nice list.

Trump’s latest achievement was getting Boeing’s CEO to back down on the cost of the new Air Force One planes. Lockheed Martin also drew the president elect’s ire over the cost of the F-35 fighter jet project. Their CEO has also agreed to re-examine pricing.

Today, December 22, Trump appointed the first successful female presidential campaign manager Kellyanne Conway as counsellor to the president. The married mother-of-four said on December 20 that she and her family would be moving to Washington DC where she planned to work on behalf of Trump in some capacity.

Now on to posts about the secular nature of Christmas.

Historically, this time of year did not have a religious nature even when the Church took root across Europe. Efforts were made during the Middle Ages with Nativity Plays, but a widespread Christian focus occurred only in the 19th century. This eventually extended to Christmas cards, which were quite bizarre when they first appeared. My posts below explain more:

The Christmas tree — a history (related to Christianity)

Christmas gifts — a history (and a Christian defence thereof)

British attitudes towards Christmas

Bizarre Christmas cards from the 19th century

Louis Prang — father of the American Christmas card

Christmas feasting and revelry (the rehabilitation of Christmas)

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