This week, President Donald Trump tweeted his frustration with the slow pace of the investigations going on at the DOJ and FBI.

Robert Mueller’s investigation is moving at an expected — incredibly, slow — pace. Before Christmas, a Trump spokesperson said it would be wrapped up early in 2018. So far, in ten months, all that Mueller has done is indict 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities. On February 17, 2018, CNN reported (emphases mine):

Special counsel Robert Mueller has indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities for allegedly meddling in the 2016 presidential election, charging them with conspiracy to defraud the United States, the Department of Justice announced Friday.

In addition, three defendants were charged with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud, and five defendants with aggravated identity theft …

The sweeping indictment describes in detail an unprecedented campaign by Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election, affirming the longstanding conclusions of the US intelligence community. It is at odds with President Donald Trump’s repeated questioning of those conclusions, which has continued throughout his first year in office. CNN reported this week that Trump is still not convinced that Russia meddled in the election.

Trump emphasized the lack of allegations of any impact on the presidential election

Beginning as early as 2014, the Russian organization Internet Research Agency began operations to interfere with the US political system, including the 2016 elections, according to the indictment.

The defendants allegedly posed as US persons, created false US personas and operated social media pages and groups designed to attract US audiences, the indictment reads. Two of the Russians also allegedly traveled to the United States in 2014 to gather intelligence for their operations …

The indictment mentions a February 2016 memo to Internet Research Agency staff telling them to post political content on US social media sites and “use any opportunity to criticize Hillary and the rest (except Sanders and Trump — we support them).” The reference to Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent who challenged Clinton for the Democratic nomination, shows that the Russian government decided early on to oppose Clinton.

Twelve of the 13 defendants charged worked for the Internet Research Agency.

[Deputy Attorney General Rod] Rosenstein said Friday that the indictment does not contain any allegations that any Americans knowingly participated in the activity.

Then, the Democrats issued their FISA memo in response to the February 2 FISA memo from Representative Devin Nunes (R-California), chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI). Representative Adam Schiff (D-California), who also serves on the HPSCI, issued the memo. On Saturday, February 24, Fox News reported:

President Trump on Saturday dismissed a Democratic rebuttal to the GOP memo outlining government surveillance abuses in the 2016 campaign as a “total political and legal bust,” claiming that it only confirms the ”terrible things” that were done by the nation’s intelligence agencies.

The rebuttal, written by Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee, concluded that officials at the FBI and Justice Department “did not abuse the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) process, omit material information, or subvert this vital tool to spy on the Trump campaign” …

The rebuttal added that the DOJ only made “narrow use” of information from [Christopher] Steele’s sources and that in later FISA renewals the DOJ provided “additional information obtained through multiple independent sources” that backed up Steele’s reporting. It challenged the Republican assertion that the FBI authorized payment to Steele, saying that it neglected that the payment was canceled.

The new memo also asserted that the dossier had been corroborated by multiple sources. However, in June 2017 testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee, former FBI Director James Comey said the opposite — that three months after the warrant on [Carter] Page had been granted he still considered the dossier “unverified” and “salacious” when he briefed incoming President Trump in January 2017 at Trump Tower

And upon the new memo’s release, Republicans on the intel committee responded with rebuttals to the rebuttal, providing more evidence that this battle has legs. For instance, while the Democrats say that the court was given information about the political motivations of Steele, Republicans say that such a statement is “buried in a footnote” that obscures rather than clarifies his motives.

“The American people now clearly understand that the FBI used political dirt paid for by the Democratic Party to spy on an American citizen from the Republican Party,” Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif. said in a statement …

The White House called the rebuttal a “politically driven document” that fails to answer the concerns raised by the Republican memo.

Democrats have claimed that the original Republican memo was an effort to attack FBI Director Robert Mueller’s investigation into alleged Russian interference in 2016. Trump had previously said that the memo “totally vindicates” him in the investigation.

Talk about a parallel universe. This is going to run and run.

Now on to Trump’s tweets.

The first two are retweets from his interview with Judge Jeanine Pirro on Saturday, February 24:

The next has to do with a clip from Fox News’s Catherine Herridge:

Trump included a quote from her and his comment:

Trump then watched other Fox News shows and pulled quotes:

Much of this is AG Jeff Sessions’s fault. Outside of MS-13 arrests and drug busts, Sessions’s recusal from any investigation into the campaign’s alleged — false — Russian collusion brought in Robert Mueller and his team which has taken Sessions out of his position of authority. Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein is, in effect, running the DOJ.

Even worse, an article from October 2017 points to the very real possibility that — even without Mueller’s investigation — Jeff Sessions was not going to investigate Hillary Clinton’s or the Obama administration’s wrongdoings.

Last September and again on October 28, former congressman (R – Utah) Jason Chaffetz spoke with Judge Jeanine about a conversation he had with Jeff Sessions. The Gateway Pundit reported on the shocking content from both interviews (bold emphases in the original, those in purple mine):

When asked whether Jeff Sessions should be out, Chaffetz correctly responded, “Well I don’t know what the case is to keep him!”

A month ago Chaffetz was on with Judge Janine and he then dropped his first bombshell on Sessions:

Chaffetz: I can tell you that while I was in Congress and the Chairman of the Oversight Committee, I did go over and visit with Attorney General Sessions and it was one of the most frustrating discussions I had because whether it was the IRS, Fast and Furious, the email scandal that we went through, I did not see the Attorney General willing to just let Lady Justice administer justice and then follow through. I understood maybe the last six months of the Obama Administration…

Judge Janine: Wait a minute I don’t have that much time. You spoke with Sessions on IRS, Fast and Furious. Did he give you a reason? Did he say he was presenting anything to a grand jury? Yes or no?

Chaffetz: No, he basically let me know he wasn’t going to pursue anything on the major cases.

Judge Janine: So IRS, on the major cases? Are we talking about Hillary Clinton, because I haven’t even gotten to her yet.

Chaffetz: Yes, the email scandal of Hillary Clinton. We had Bryan Pagliano. I issued a subpoena for him to appear before the Committee and he said “No”. He didn’t even show up. We issued another subpoena. The US Marshals served it. And you know in my world, if you’re in court, I guarantee you that a subpoena is not an optional activity. We wanted the Attorney General to prosecute him and he said “No”.

Pagliano maintained Hillary’s private server when she was Secretary of State and, before that, managed the IT for her failed 2008 campaign.

The Gateway Pundit article concludes:

Sessions’ actions as AG are the opposite of what a decent AG would do if he was seeking justice.  Sessions is compromised and as a result he is no better than Obama’s corrupt and criminal AG’s Holder and Lynch.  Sessions is now the biggest snake in the swamp.  Nothing gets done and nobody gets investigated, prosecuted or punished for criminal deeds because of Sessions.

Sessions is the SWAMP! He must go!

Supposedly, the DOJ’s inspector general (IG) Michael Horowitz is scheduled to issue a report this month about his own investigation into the department and the FBI. It is now thought that it could appear in April.

Regarding the IG’s report, on Wednesday, February 28, the Washington Examiner covered the tweet from Trump supporter Jerry Falwell Jr, president of Liberty University (emphasis mine):

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. suggested Wednesday that Attorney General Jeff Sessions might be a “coward,” after President Trump attacked Sessions for not moving convincingly enough to investigate abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act under former President Barack Obama …

Falwell tweeted after Trump asked why Sessions has … the Justice Department’s Office of Inspector General to examine FISA abuse, instead of the department’s own lawyers. Trump said the IG route will “take forever,” and said the IG has no power to act if it finds wrongdoing. Sessions later tweeted that he was using the “appropriate process.”

(Sigh.)

All being well, the public outcry from Trump’s supporters will be such that Sessions will get the message that he should stand down. The only problem is that there is no one Trump can easily move laterally into that spot. That is the only way a replacement could work, since the Senate told Trump last year they would not approve another AG.

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