Is it time to delete your Facebook account?

If so, actor James Woods recently tweeted a Wall Street Journal video which tells you how to go about it. The lady talks quickly, so you might have to replay it or pause it as you go:

While the Wall Street Journal is behind a paywall, this video is not.

The downside to Facebook is that, even if you delete your account, all your data belong to them:

The website hosting company easyDNS’s CEO responded to Woods with a link to an article on his website:

His article has excellent information, including a section on Messenger, excerpted below:

Facebook harvests your contact lists from your mobile devices (don’t believe me, go here)

There are people in that list that I do not know. There are phone numbers from people who work for my competitors in there. My daughter’s (age 11) cell phone number is in there.

You can “delete” all this here: (but as you know Facebook never actually deletes anything).

Then when you go to “delete” all your contacts you get a message

“We won’t be able to tell you when your friends start using Messenger if you delete all your uploaded contact info.”

They say that like it’s a bad thing. But there is also this curious sentence:

“If you have Continuous Uploading turned on in the Messenger app, your contact info will be uploaded again the next time the app syncs with Facebook servers.”

I had deleted the Facebook mobile app from my phone a long time ago. I kept messenger installed because sometimes customers would contact easyDNS or Zoneedit via our Facebook pages for support.

But writing this I wanted to turn off “continuous uploading” in the app. Despite this Facebook help article not explaining how to do it, while this third party article from 2016 did.

It turned out I had already disabled continuous uploading but I was surprised to find that the messenger app had defaulted permission to access my phone’s microphone.

After this exercise I simply deleted the Messenger app from my phone as well.

I’ve never had a Facebook account. From my time in IT marketing during the DotCom boom 20 years ago, it was apparent that Big Data was on its way. Data harvesting and targeted ads were already being talked about. Both have been with us for some time.

The best thing is not to be on Facebook at all, but, for those with a presence, why continue to feed the beast?

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