Just time for a quick post today.

A year ago at this time we were in Cannes.

One of the things I bought was Piment d’Espelette, which is all the rage not only in France but also in the UK and the US. It’s often pronounced in hushed tones because it’s supposed to be so special.

On a geographic and historic level, it is special, as Wikipedia explains:

The Espelette pepper (French: Piment d’Espelette French pronunciation: ​[pi.mɑ̃ dɛs.pə.lɛt] ; Basque: Ezpeletako biperra) is a variety of Capsicum annuum that is cultivated in the French commune of Espelette, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, traditionally the northern territory of the Basque people.[1] On 1 June 2000, it was classified as an AOC product and was confirmed as an APO product on 22 August 2002.

Chili pepper, originating in Central and South America, was introduced into France during the 16th century. After first being used medicinally, it became popular as a condiment and for the conservation of meats. It is now a cornerstone of Basque cuisine, where it has gradually replaced black pepper and it is a key ingredient in piperade.[2]

AOC espelette peppers are cultivated in the following communes: Ainhoa, Cambo-les-Bains, Espelette, Halsou, Itxassou, Jatxou, Larressore, Saint-Pée-sur-Nivelle, Souraïde, and Ustaritz. They are harvested in late summer and, in September, characteristic festoons of pepper are hung on balconies and house walls throughout the communes to dry out.[2] An annual pepper festival organized by Confrérie du Piment d’Espelette, held since 1968 on the last weekend in October, attracts some 20,000 tourists.[3][4]

That said, it is really mild, which I did not know until I tried it at home.

The French like it because they’re not that keen on heat.

If you like heat, cayenne pepper is a far better — and much cheaper (€4 versus €13) — alternative.

Advertisements