You are currently browsing the daily archive for March 31, 2019.

This past week was another disappointing one in Parliament, to say the least.

The vaunted date of departure from the EU — Friday, March 29, 2019 — came and went with no change in Britain’s EU membership. For those who voted Leave in the June 23, 2016 referendum, it was a sad day indeed. Journalist Tim Montgomerie’s tweet of a man crying summed up the situation perfectly:

Conservative MP Bill Cash correctly assessed the situation, sadly, to no avail:

Another prominent Conservative MP, David Davis, also spoke up. He resigned from Theresa May’s Brexit team last summer because of her faulty plan drawn up at Chequers (the prime ministerial weekend residence). This plan, her plan which has now had three unsuccessful meaningful votes (MV3 was on Friday), appeared out of the blue. She forced her Brexit team to accept her plan rather than No Deal. Hence, Davis’s and others’ resignations from her Brexit team.

Davis confirms that the referendum result is being ignored but could still be saved if enough MPs do the ‘right thing’:

David Davis is a great MP, and it is a shame that he will never be party leader. That is probably because he a) has a discernible moral compass and b) is outside the Oxbridge clique that dominates today’s party politics in Britain.

Whilst he did end up voting for Theresa May’s (Chequers) Plan on Friday, he did so hoping that Britain would leave the EU that day, as scheduled.

In recent weeks, Prime Minister May has changed her tune from ‘No deal is better than a bad deal (hers)’ to ‘My deal or no deal’.

In the aforementioned editorial for The Sun, Davis wrote (emphasis in the original, those in purple mine):

THE Prime Minister’s Withdrawal Agreement has been voted down three times. It’s had more comebacks than Frank Sinatra

Despite this I voted for it twice but with great reluctance as the alternative is so much worse.

If unreconciled Remainers in Parliament are allowed to hijack negotiations, we will get Brexit in name only, or no Brexit at all.

It’s a terrible state of affairs and I wish the Government had had the courage to maintain the possibility of a No Deal exit.

It would have given leverage to our negotiating position and delivered a better deal.

Frankly what we face now is a crisis of democracy. Record numbers of Britons voted in their droves to leave the EU.

Subsequently both the main parties and others, too, promised at the 2017 General Election that we would leave on time and exit the single market and customs union.

Now that is threatened. Those who wish to thwart Brexit have captured Parliament and will exert a terrible price by forcing the UK to remain in the customs union in complete contradiction of their election manifestos.

It is a mystery why May did not push for a No Deal on World Trade Organization terms. That was what Leave voters had in mind when they cast their ballots in 2016: a clean break with the EU and full autonomy for the UK.

Last Sunday, I wrote that MPs would be voting on alternative measures to a no deal Leave plan or Theresa May’s in the last week of March. These are called indicative votes.

None of the indicative votes from Wednesday, March 27 passed, making the churning Brexit waters much murkier:

Except for Motions B (No Deal) and O (Contingent preferential arrangements), those are all bad proposals. Revocation — Motion L — overturns the referendum result. Confirming Parliament’s decision by public vote — Motion M — similarly would overturn the referendum result. The customs union proposals would cost the UK more in loss of autonomy than full EU membership. They would also be costly financially, especially compared with the trade benefit we would receive in turn:

According to David Davis, PM May will not enact anything that does not resemble Brexit:

We can only hope that this continues to be the case as we enter April.

As Davis explains in his Brexit Central article of March 27 (emphases mine):

The British people knew exactly what they were voting for – and they rightly expect Parliament to deliver it.

And the more that the people hear that they did not know what they voted for, the more their opinion crystallises. We need only look at yesterday’s ComRes poll, which shows the largest yet recorded support for a no-deal Brexit. Over 40% of people believe we should leave on WTO rules, a number that grows every week. The idea that Leave voters did not vote to leave the Customs Union or the Single Market has no grounding in fact. It is patronising, and dismissive of their views.

So the Prime Minister is right to listen to Parliament, but she is also right to rule out any options that do not meet the democratic decision of the British people. Yesterday’s ComRes poll showed that a clear majority of people believe that attempts by Remain-supporting MPs and other Establishment figures to block Brexit were undermining the UK’s negotiation position. More than half believe that if MPs go against the 2016 decision it will irreversibly damage democracy. So the Prime Minister’s first democratic duty is to the electorate directly, to deliver a proper Brexit as soon as practically possible.

In the final analysis, the Prime Minister is the servant, not of Party, nor of Parliament, but of the people, and that should be her guiding principle throughout the Brexit process. Otherwise the British people will lose faith in their democracy, and the United Kingdom will face its Trump moment.

‘Trump moment’ is a dog-whistle, as most Britons believe that to be the worst thing that could ever happen in British politics.

The indicative votes are set to be debated on Monday, April 1. How apposite.

More on Brexit will follow in the days ahead.

Forbidden Bible Verses will appear on Monday.

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