Now that Robert Mueller’s probe is done and dusted, President Trump’s administration is free to look at Spygate.

Department of Justice officials want to know exactly who was behind the accusations of Russian interference and spying on then-candidate Donald Trump.

Jeff Carlson, who writes for Epoch Times, has laid out a Twitter thread (also see Threadreader version) about what is likely to happen in the coming months. It could be a long hot summer for some!

This concerns last week’s appointment of John H Durham, US Attorney for Connecticut, to investigate the Russia probe.

To top it off, Attorney General William Barr will be working not only with the FBI, but also the CIA on this.

Carlson has included Trump administration history for greater context:

I certainly hope so.

Many of us are familiar with the old saying:

The wheels of justice grind exceedingly slow, but they grind exceedingly fine.

The origin of that dates back to the Ancient World, referring to Roman gods and the grinding wheels of a mill, or millstones.

From Wikipedia’s entry, Mills of God:

Plutarch (1st century AD) alludes to the metaphor as a then-current adage in his Moralia (De sera numinis vindicta “On the Delay of Divine Vengeance”):

“Thus, I do not see what use there is in those mills of the gods said to grind so late as to render punishment hard to be recognized, and to make wickedness fearless.”[3]

Plutarch no doubt here makes reference to a hexameter by an unknown poet, cited by sceptic philosopher, Sextus Empiricus (2nd century) in his Adversus Grammaticos as a popular adage:[4]

Ὀψὲ θεῶν ἀλέουσι μύλοι, ἀλέουσι δὲ λεπτά.
“The millstones of the gods grind late, but they grind fine.”[5]

It was later Christianised:

The expression was anthologised in English translation by George Herbert in his collection of proverbs entitled Jacula Prudentum (1652), as “God’s mill grinds slow but sure” (no. 743). German epigrammatist Friedrich von Logau in his Sinngedichte (c. 1654) composed an extended variant of the saying, under the title “Göttliche Rache” (divine retribution),[10]

Gottes Mühlen mahlen langsam, mahlen aber trefflich klein,
ob aus Langmut er sich säumet, bringt mit Schärf ‘er alles ein.

translated into English by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (“Retribution”, Poetic Aphorisms, 1846):[11]

Though the mills of God grind slowly; Yet they grind exceeding small;
Though with patience He stands waiting, With exactness grinds He all.

Nowadays, we often read ‘justice’ substituted for ‘God’.

Nonetheless, may God’s grace work through those involved in this investigation. May justice be done.

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