Admittedly, the Western world, including the United States, has been in dire straits with the coronavirus lockdown.

Kentucky ran into trouble on Holy Saturday, April 11. Louisville’s mayor wanted the licence plate numbers of drivers going to worship on Easter — April 12 — the greatest feast of the Church year, to be registered with the authorities:

The Daily Caller reported that the mayor was opposed (emphases mine):

A federal judge granted a restraining order against a Kentucky mayor who promised to record the license plates of Easter church goers, calling the order “unconstitutional.”

U.S. District Court Judge Justin Walker granted the temporary restraining order (TRO) preventing Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer from blocking Easter drive-in-services at On Fire Church, the non-profit public interest law firm First Liberty Institute announced in a Saturday press release.

Judge Walker:

condemned Fischer’s order in a memorandum opinion that compared the order to a report from the satirical publication, “The Onion.”

“That sentence is one that this Court never expected to see outside the pages of a dystopian novel, or perhaps the pages of The Onion,” Walker said.

“But two days ago, citing the need for social distancing during the current pandemic, Louisville’s Mayor Greg Fischer ordered Christians not to attend Sunday services, even if they remained in their cars to worship –and even though it’s Easter.”

The Mayor’s decision is stunning,” the opinion concludes. “And it is,’beyond all reason,’ unconstitutional.”

Yet, the Democrat governor of Kentucky agreed with the mayor of Louisville:

Democratic Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear had announced that the state would enforce stay-at-home measure by recording the license plates of any person attending Easter services.

“This is a time and weekend, a whole week for multiple faiths, that is about faith. It’s about knowing we have faced as people – as Christians, as Jews, as members of many faiths – many difficult, dark times, and we have prevailed,” Beshear said Friday.

“We know that the weeks or the months ahead will be difficult. We know that there are going to be tougher days before there are easier days.”

“This is the only way we can ensure that your decision doesn’t kill someone else,” Beshear added.

On April 10 — Good Friday — the US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) urged the mayor of Louisville to respect Easter worship, according to Kentucky Today:

The publication obtained a letter in which McConnell told Fischer that it is “important that we continue to respect and protect the constitutional rights of our citizens.”

“When the government permits people in vehicles to gather in parking lots for secular purposes but prohibits them from doing so for religious purposes, it raises the specter that the government is singling religious people out for disfavored treatment,” McConnell wrote, according to Kentucky Today.

“I believe churches should be following CDC guidelines on mitigating the transmission of COVID-19 and support temporary government regulations consistent with that guideline,” he added. “Religious organizations share the national responsibility to right the disease’s spread.”

Unfortunately, Attorney General William Barr waited until after Easter to take action: more here.

There was a similar case in Mississippi:

Never mind that these people were sitting in their cars, not in pews:

Meanwhile:

Forget the video, see the second tweet, which has an important message from the prominent American trial attorney Robert Barnes. State governors cannot take away basic constitutional rights:

Think about it. The United States and the rest of the Western world are at an important crossroads here with regard to religious freedom and civil liberties.

Is it a case of ‘just a few states across the pond’ or is it all of us, regardless of where we live?

This is something to reflect upon in the coming weeks.