jesus-christ-the-king-blogsigncomMay I wish all my readers a joyful and blessed Easter. Our Lord Jesus is risen!

Readings for Easter Day can be found here.

There are two Gospel choices for Easter Day. The exegesis on John 20:1-18 can be found here.

Today’s post is about the second Gospel reading, Luke 24:1-12 (emphases mine):

Luke 24:1-12

24:1 But on the first day of the week, at early dawn, they came to the tomb, taking the spices that they had prepared.

24:2 They found the stone rolled away from the tomb,

24:3 but when they went in, they did not find the body.

24:4 While they were perplexed about this, suddenly two men in dazzling clothes stood beside them.

24:5 The women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen.

24:6 Remember how he told you, while he was still in Galilee,

24:7 that the Son of Man must be handed over to sinners, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again.”

24:8 Then they remembered his words,

24:9 and returning from the tomb, they told all this to the eleven and to all the rest.

24:10 Now it was Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and the other women with them who told this to the apostles.

24:11 But these words seemed to them an idle tale, and they did not believe them.

24:12 But Peter got up and ran to the tomb; stooping and looking in, he saw the linen cloths by themselves; then he went home, amazed at what had happened.

Commentary comes from Matthew Henry and John MacArthur.

Matthew Henry’s commentary says that the Resurrection is another holy mystery:

The manner of the re-uniting of Christ’s soul and body in his resurrection is a mystery, one of the secret things that belong not to us; but the infallible proofs of his resurrection, that he did indeed rise from the dead, and was thereby proved to be the Son of God, are things revealed, which belong to us and to our children. Some of them we have here in these verses, which relate the same story for substance that we had in Matthew and Mark.

John MacArthur reminds us that the Resurrection was the culmination of God’s plan for our redemption. It was certainly a belief in Old Testament times:

The resurrection of Christ is the greatest event in history, as I said.  It is the main event in God’s redemptive plan It is the cornerstone and foundation of the gospel According to Romans 10:9 and 10, in order to be saved you have to believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ Now, we understand that the message that God has delivered to sinners throughout all of Scripture is that death does not end our existence That is the message of Scripture from the start to the finish, that death is merely the doorway into eternity And everyone goes through that doorway and everyone lives forever, some to the resurrection of life, and some to the resurrection of damnation, to borrow the words of John 5.  Every human being ever born will live forever, fully conscious either in everlasting joy or everlasting suffering.

For those who, by faith, have come into the Kingdom of God, into the realm of salvation, the promise is that they will experience a resurrection unto life, that not only will their spirits dwell forever in the presence of God in eternal bliss, but they will receive a resurrected body fit for that everlasting joy This has been the hope of God’s people throughout all redemptive history It was the hope of Abraham, as Hebrews 11 tells us.  It was the hope of Moses, as we learn in Scripture as well.  It was the hope of Job It was the hope of Isaiah It was the hope of Daniel, for example.  This has always been the hope of God’s people, whether it is the psalmist who says, “I know that someday I will wake in His likeness,” or whether it is Job who says, “Though worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God.”  The hope of resurrection has always been at the heart of believers’ faith.  It comes to crystal clarity through the resurrection of Jesus Christ who says in John 14:19, “Because I live, you will live also.”  He is the firstfruits of the resurrection He said, “I am the resurrection and the life.  Whoever believes in Me though he die, yet shall he live.” 

The Gospel accounts differ in detail, however, they all agree that Jesus rose from the dead.

MacArthur’s sermon gives us the whole story, not only through Luke’s version but also of the other three Gospel authors:

As we approach the resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ, we’re going to work our way through this account very carefully and very thoughtfully.  Since all four gospels deal with the resurrection, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John all deal with the resurrection, they bring to bear upon the account of this most significant of all events in human history their own perspectives.  They all cover some of the same things and yet each of them has its own special emphasis, and details common to each writer that are not in the other accounts What this means is: we have to weave all of this together to get the full picture My hope will be that you will be able to follow this multi-faceted event as I endeavor to weave the accounts together around the main focus of Luke.

Luke opens his 24th chapter by telling us that ‘they’ — the women — went to the tomb of Jesus in the early dawn of the third day after His death; they had prepared spices for anointing Him (verse 1).

MacArthur says that Luke is picking up from the end of his 23rd chapter:

Verse 1 of Luke 24, they came to the tomb.  Who are they?  Back to verse 55, “The women who had come with Him out of Galilee,” and that’s a larger group of women So, Luke doesn’t mention Mary Magdalene in his opening section, although we’ll get to the mention of Mary Magdalene down in verse 10 in a minute.

We find out their identities in verse 10, but let us establish them now:

Matthew says Mary Magdalene didn’t start out alone Mary Magdalene was accompanied, the Scripture says, with another Mary: Mary, the mother of James and Joseph; Mary also called the wife of Clopas, another MarySo, these two women, Mary Magdalene and Mary, the mother of James and Joseph, also known as the wife of Clopas, they start out together in the early dawn.  Most likely, Mary Magdalene is the youngest of all There are other women, right?

Neither commentator mentioned Joanna. Women in the Bible says that she was an influential woman, the wife of Chuza, who ran the household of Herod Antipas in Galilee. It is thought that Joanna heard about Jesus early on, as the Antipas estate was near Nazareth.

Luke 8 records that Jesus cured Joanna of an infirmity, much like he did Mary Magdalene:

Luke 8:1-3

1 Soon afterward he went on through cities and villages, preaching and bringing the good news of the kingdom of God. And the twelve were with him, 2 and also some women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities: Mary, called Mag’dalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, 3 and Joan’na, the wife of Chuza, Herod’s steward, and Susanna, and many others, who provided for them out of their means.

Women in the Bible says that it is possible that Joanna helped to finance the ministry of Jesus and the Apostles. She also might have had some inside information as to what happened during His trial and torture on Good Friday.

Returning to Luke, the women could not have gone to the tomb the day before because it was the Sabbath, so they were eager to attend to Him as soon as they could on Sunday.

The question arises, ‘How could they get into the tomb to anoint our Lord when there was a heavy stone rolled over the door?’

Other accounts tell us that the women knew about the stone and wondered who would be able to roll it away for them.

However, when they arrived, they found the stone rolled away from the tomb (verse 2).

Furthermore, when they entered the tomb, there was no body (verse 3).

What exactly happened?

MacArthur gives us the narrative from the end of Luke 23, Good Friday:

They had come with him, these women out of Galilee.  And they followed, you remember, Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus who showed up They followed them to the tomb.  They were still stunned.  They were still in shock.  They had just lived through the most bizarre, horrific experience.  The one who they had put their trust in, the Lord Jesus, had been arrested, He had been beaten, He had been crucified, He’s dead, and here are these men now putting a few spices on His body, not really a few, a hundred pound weight that Nicodemus brought and they’re anointing His body and putting it in the grave And the women are still stunned, they’re not helping, they’re just looking and watching But they determined that they wanted to have a part in it.  And so it says in verse 56 that after watching His body being laid in Joseph’s tomb, they returned and prepared spices and perfume

Now to the other accounts about the women’s arrival:

Here’s what probably happened The women all go to anoint the body of Jesus.  Mary Magdalene starts out with Mary, the mother of James They’re moving faster than the rest who may have been older They’re stringing out in the darkness as they begin.  The two Marys head for the tomb together.  Matthew 28:1 says, “Those two Marys headed for the tomb,” kind of the first of the women.  But John says, “Mary Magdalene came to the tomb,” which means she outpaced the other one She gets there by herself according to John’s account.  It’s still dark at this point and it’s light enough maybe that she can discern when she gets close to the tomb that the stone is gone She spins on her sandals and head the other direction She arrives in the dusky dark side of the dawn, but clear enough to see the stone is removed.  She’s the first one there.  Her companion Mary is somewhere back progressing in that direction And the other women, perhaps near her, coming in the dark at a different pace. 

John says that Mary Magdalene saw the open entrance and immediately left, didn’t go in, bolted.  Probably didn’t go back maybe the same way the other women did, so that there’s no indication she ran into them.  She heads directly to Peter and John and the apostle, and she gives this report that the body of Jesus has been stolen That’s an assumption she didn’t check And for that moment then, when John says it was still dark, it was the darkest part of any experience that these women had because she was the first one there.  And as the others came progressively, it became light, and that’s why the other writers when the whole group comes say what Luke says, “At early dawn,” or, “The sun had risen.” 

So, the timing is so wonderful, the explicitness of Scripture.  The earliest one there is Mary.  The rest come, verse 1, to the tomb, bringing the spices they had prepared They found the same thing Mary had found She’s there and gone, headed for Peter and John.  They found the stone rolled away from the tomb This is a shocking sight.  This is a stunning sight because, frankly, they had been having a discussion on the way, according to Mark 16.  Listen to what Mark says.  “Very early on the first day of the week, they came to the tomb when the sun had risen and they were saying to one another on the way, ‘Who will roll away the stone for us from the entrance of the tomb?’“ Remember now, they were there on Friday night when Jesus was laid in the tomb, and Joseph and Nicodemus rolled the stone over the entrance They knew it was there and they asked the question: who will roll away the stone for us from the entrance of the tomb?  “And looking up they saw that the stone had been rolled away, although it was extremely large.”  So, on the way they’re having the discussion.  We’re going to go there, we’ve got all these spices we’ve prepared on Friday, we’re going to do our part to show our love to the Lord by putting spices, more spices on His body, but who is going to roll away the stone?

Remember that they had rolled the stone across the front.  Mark 15:46 says that he rolled a stone against the entrance to the tomb, did Joseph of Arimathea They had no idea how they were going to get that stone out of there. 

One aspect the women were unaware of were the Roman guards, who were gone by the time they got there because of a second earthquake that took place early on Sunday. The first earthquake took place on Friday, after Jesus breathed His last:

Furthermore, they had no idea of something else that had happened.  The day after the preparation, Matthew 27:62, “The chief priests and Pharisees gathered together with Pilate and said, ‘Sir, we remember that when He was still alive, that deceiver, Jesus, said after three days I’m going to rise again Therefore, give orders for the grave to be made secure till the third day lest the disciples come and steal Him away and say to the people He has risen from the dead and the last deception be worse than the first.’ Pilate said to them, ‘You have a guard.  Go.  Make it as secure as you know how.’ And they went, made the grave secure and along with the guard they set a seal on the stone.” 

The women had no idea that had happened on Saturday On Saturday the Jews who were afraid that the disciples would steal the body to fabricate a phony resurrection asked Pilate for a guard.  They got a guard.  The tomb is sealed with an official Roman seal, not to be broken And a Roman guard is placed in front of the tomb They have no idea about that.  They’re going to go thinking it’s just the tomb but the only obstacle they’re going to have is the stone.  So, they would not have known about the guard.  Now, when they get there, interestingly enough, there’s no guard there.  It doesn’t say anything in any of the four gospels about the women ever meeting the Roman guard, never.  You say, “Well, where did they go?”  Well, for that you have to go back to Matthew 28.  And here in Matthew 28 verse 2, what happened on Saturday was they set a guard.  What happened in the early dark hours of Sunday, verse 2, “Behold, a severe earthquake had occurred.”  This would be the second earthquake There was one on Friday, equally severe, that split the rocks, threw open tombs “A severe earthquake had occurred, for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven and came, and rolled away the stone and sat upon it And his appearance was like lightning, and his garment as white as snow, and the guards shook for fear of him and became like dead men.”

Well, some interesting things have been going on while these ladies were away.  The guard is set on Saturday and on Sunday morning an angel comes down out of heaven, there is a massive earthquake, the angel rolls the stone away and the guards are shocked into some kind of a coma By the way, the angel did not roll the stone away to let Jesus out, he rolled the stone away to let the people in Jesus could walk through walls He did that a little later, right?  The door being shut, He appeared to the apostles.

Now, what happened?  Well I’ll tell you basically, it’s pretty obvious.  By the time the women get there, there aren’t any soldiers there.  If there were any soldiers there, they would have commented about them, they would have had a conversation with them.  They would have asked them: how did this happen?  What happened?  It is reasonable to assume that in the deep dark night of that Sunday morning when the earthquake came, and the soldiers were knocked into their coma, they eventually they came out of it and they realized what had happened The stone was gone, they had these shaken visions of a blazing angel, the reverberations of a massive earthquake They realized that the body of Jesus is gone They had therefore failed in their duty.  They understood the implications of that.  They know something powerful, if not supernatural, has happened.  They head back into the city. 

As soon as they wake up, there’s no reason to stay there anymore ‘cause Jesus is gone.  They must have gone inside in the pitch darkness and found that He was not there.  So, they have to face reality.  They have to go to the Jewish leaders to try to explain to them what happened And by the time the women get there, they’re gone.  They’re gone …

So, let’s pick up what they said Go back to Matthew 28.  When they finally got to the Jewish leaders to try to explain.  Verse 11, “While they were on their way, some of the guard came into the city, reported to the chief priests all that had happened.”  Just exactly what did they say?  Well they reported all that had happened.  What would they then say?  “Sir, there was this really, really severe earthquake, and then there was this blazing, flashing, dazzling being who rolled the stone away.  And then we were knocked out.  And when we came to, the body was gone.”  That’s what they said because that’s what happened.  Verse 12, “And when they had assembled with the elders and counseled together, they gave a large sum of money to the soldiers.”  Really?  You reward them for that?  Oh, they said to them, “You are to say, ‘His disciples came by night and stole Him away while we were asleep.’“ Huh, they’re not likely to say that because a Roman soldier who slept on his guard would be more than court marshaled; he could even be executed But you’re to lie And if it comes to the governor’s ears, Pilate, who was the commander in Chief of all soldiers, they knew they would be in trouble.  The Jewish leaders say, “We’ll win him over and keep you out of trouble.  We’ll save your hide.” 

And they took the money and did as they had been instructed, and this story was widely spread among the Jews and is to this day, to the day that Matthew is writing, that is still the story the disciples came and stole the body The Roman soldiers knew it was a lie; they were bribed The Jews knew it was a lie; they paid the bribe The tomb was empty.  There was no explanation other than the soldiers’ experience and they were paid off not to tell the truth.

If Jesus didn’t rise from the dead, it would have been an easy thing for the Jews to prove Just bring out His body But they couldn’t, so they entangled themselves in this hopeless series of absurdities trying to explain away the empty tomb.  And they came up with a lie, a huge lie to cover the truth They never, no Jewish leaders, no Jewish people ever denied the tomb was empty They just invented the lie that the disciples had stolen it, a lie that is impossible because the disciples, the women, the men had no expectation that Jesus would rise.

It’s important, folks, to understand the tomb is empty There is no explanation for that on a human level The only explanation is the text of Scripture: an angel came, rolled the stone away and Christ, who promised to rise, was alive and walked out And by the way, the empty tomb alone was enough to convince John He was the only one really convinced According to John 20 verses 6 to 8, “John saw the empty tomb, saw the clothes lying there, and believed.”  Nobody else did.

Returning to Luke, the women were perplexed about the stone and the lack of a body when, suddenly, two men — angels — in dazzling clothes appeared beside them (verse 4).

Upon seeing the men, the women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground; the men asked them why they sought the living among the dead, when He had risen (verse 5).

MacArthur brings in the other accounts of the angels in the Resurrection story:

the second great evidence of the resurrection is divine revelation.  They are perplexed, back to verse 4, they are perplexed, no idea what occurred.  The whole ordeal, the trial, the cross, the whole thing is surreal, if not outright bizarre.  As they stand in the dawning sunlight and shadows, they’re jolted into the most frightening scene they have ever experienced in their entire lives.  There’s no reason to assume that any of these women had seen angels, apart from the mother of our Lord.  Two men suddenly stood near them in dazzling clothing.  John describes them as two angels Angels appear often in human form Mark describes one of them as a young man, so they are angels, spiritual beings who can take on human form and take on the form of a young man That would be a consistent thing for an angel to do because angels don’t age

Clearly there are two of them, perhaps because of Deuteronomy 19:15, two witnesses to validate anything However, Matthew and Mark speak only of one who speaks Matthew and Mark say, “An angel spoke.  An angel spoke.”  They don’t refer to two, simply identifying the fact that there were two angels but they spoke one at a time.  They spoke separately, and I am sure they probably spoke repeatedly, because you have a little bit of variation of what they say.  Matthew, Mark, and Luke give you a little variation on what they actually said which would indicate to me that it was a very somewhat supernatural conversation, that they would say something and the women would be hard pressed to process that.  And one at a time, not in unison, they would speak.  And so Matthew and Mark tell us what the individual angels said, but we know from John and Luke there were two of them.

The angels reminded the women that when Jesus was in Galilee (verse 6), He said that He would be handed over to sinners, be crucified and rise again on the third day (verse 7).

The women then remembered what Jesus had said (verse 8).

MacArthur expands on these verses:

This is a reminder This is why there’s a mild rebuke.  Why do you seek the living One among the dead?  It’s a mild rebuke He’s been saying this for a long time.  If you go back in to Luke 9 when He’s still in Galilee and verse 22, He warns them and says, “Son of Man must suffer many things.  Be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised up on the third day.”  He told them that.  He reiterated again in chapter 9 verse 43, “They were all amazed at the greatness of God, while everyone was marveling at all that He was doing, He said to His disciples, ‘Let these words sink in to your ears, the Son of Man is going to be delivered into the hands of men.’“ But they didn’t understand this statement.  It was concealed from them so they might not conceive it and they were afraid to ask Him about it Even though He said it.  And by the way, He repeats it and repeats it and repeats it.  He makes the same promise several times recorded in the book of Matthew, several times recorded in the book of Mark Another time in the 18th chapter of Luke This is what’s going to happen.  And it started all the way back in Galilee; don’t you remember that He’s going to be delivered?  He’s going to be crucified?  And He’s going to be raised?  Delivered, crucified and raised. 

So, the evidence concerning the resurrection is the empty tomb, and there is no other explanation for the empty tomb than a resurrection The Jews didn’t steal His body.  The Romans didn’t steal His body.  The Apostles didn’t steal His body.  The women didn’t steal His body.  His enemies had no reason to steal His body and fabricate a resurrection.  His friends didn’t even believe in a resurrection, and nor would they steal His body, fabricate a false resurrection and then go out and die as martyrs for a phony.  The angels give the only possible explanation: He’s not here because He’s risen

The aforementioned women (verse 10) left the tomb and told the eleven remaining Apostles what had happened (verse 9).

Some astute readers might be wondering about the other Resurrection accounts concerning Mary Magdalene (verse 10).

MacArthur explains:

The last thing we heard about Mary Magdalene, she went there, saw nothing but an empty grave, came back with the wrong information Up to now, as far as we know, she hasn’t come to any conclusion except that somebody stole the body.  She’s told Peter and John her conclusion that somebody stole the body, which sent them on their way back.  How does she get into this group?  Well, Luke is condensing this story I’ll tell you how she got into this group.  Turn to John 20 – this is just so wonderful.  How can she belong to the group of eyewitnesses when she didn’t go in the empty tomb, and she didn’t hear the angels say anything?  She left before the angels spoke, or appeared.  And she had not seen the risen Christ, so how can she be one of the witnesses?

Answer: This lady went back to the tomb This lady went back to the tomb.  At some point she decides she has to go back And so in John 20, verse 11, we find her standing outside the tomb weeping She’s all alone.  “And so, as she wept, she stooped and looked into the tomb; and she beheld two angels in white sitting” – now they’re sitting on the inside.  These are two different scenes at two different times, and this one is a private viewing for Mary And they’re sitting there, “one at the head and one at the feet, where the body of Jesus had been lying.  And they said to her, ‘Woman, why are you weeping?’”  I mean it just seems so – like you walk in an empty tomb and an angel talks to you, and he just says, “Hey, why you crying, lady?”  It’s just such a natural conversation.  “She said, ‘Because they have taken away My Lord, and I don’t know where they have laid Him.’”  She’s still sticking with her theory.  “And when she had said this, she turned around and behold – or beheld Jesus standing there and didn’t know that it was Jesus.”  Why?  I don’t know; maybe she couldn’t see through her tears.  But then, nobody after the resurrection of Jesus could really know who He was until He revealed Himself, right?  That was true of the disciples on the road to Emmaus.

And Jesus asked the same question, “‘Woman, why are you weeping?  Why are you crying?  Whom are you seeking?’  Supposing Him to be the gardener, she said to Him, ‘Sir, if You have carried Him away, tell me where You’ve laid Him, and I’ll take Him away.’”  That’s a really stupid thing, why would the gardener steal a body out of tomb?  I love this – “Jesus said to her, ‘Mary!’  She turned and said to Him in Hebrew, ‘Rabboni!’ (which means, Teacher).”  And then she grabbed Him, hung on to Him, probably on His feet and ankles.  “‘Stop clinging to Me,’ He said to her, ‘I’ve not yet ascended to the Father; go to My brothers, say to them, “I ascend to My Father, Your Father, My God and Your God.”’”  “Now, Mary, you go, you tell them you saw Me.  I am alive for a while, you can’t keep Me here, I’m going to ascend to heaven, I’m going to go back to the Father, but I will meet you all in Galilee for a while.”  In fact, He met them that night, and the next Sunday night as well, and many other appearances in the 40 days before He ascended So He says to Mary, “You go,” and this is wonderful, verse 18, “Mary Magdalene came, announcing to the disciples, ‘I have seen the Lord,’ and said that He had said these things to her.”

Returning to Luke, the Apostles did not believe the women, thinking that their account was but an idle tale (verse 11).

Henry has a stinging comment:

Their words seemed to them as idle tales, and they believed them not. They thought it was only the fancy of the women, and imputed it to the power of imagination; for they also had forgotten Christ’s words, and wanted to be put in mind of them, not only what he had said to them in Galilee some time ago, but what he had said very lately, in the night wherein he was betrayed: Again a little while, and ye shall see me. I will see you again. One cannot but be amazed at the stupidity of these disciples,–who had themselves so often professed that they believed Christ to be the Son of God and the true Messiah, had been so often told that he must die and rise again, and then enter into his glory, had seen him more than once raise the dead,–that they should be so backward to believe in his raising himself. Surely it would seem the less strange to them, when hereafter this complaint would justly be taken up by them, to remember that there was a time when it might justly have been taken up against them, Who hath believed our report?

Then Peter got up and ran to the tomb, where he saw but the linen cloths; he returned home, amazed by what had happened (verse 12).

This part is a bit confusing, too, but MacArthur says:

Peter arose earlier – this is a flashback – and he had gone to the tomb, stooped, looked in, saw the linen wrappings only; went away to his home marveling at what had happened.  What do you think he was thinking?  What do you mean marveling at what had happened?  Thaumaz, he was traumatized, he – I think he was beginning to think, “This is a resurrection – this is a resurrection.”

Now, when Peter did go to the tomb, it was before Mary Magdalene came back It was before the full testimony of the women The chronology is clear in John, so let’s turn to John chapter 20 This is wonderful.  Verse 3, Peter leaves after hearing from Mary Magdalene, “and the other disciple” – that’s how John refers to himself, in his humble way – Peter goes to the tomb with John, and they’re running They’re going to verify Mary Magdalene’s story that somebody stole the body And the other disciple is faster than Peter, which knowing Peter’s personality was something to bother him.  He always wanted to be the first.  So John’s faster, younger; came to the tomb first, stooping, looking in.  He’s a little more retiring and shy.  He saw the linen wrappings lying there, he didn’t go in.  He’s trying to process this.  “Simon Peter therefore also came following him and entered the tomb.”  Of course, just blows right by John and goes in there.  And he sees “the linen wrappings lying there, and the face cloth which had been on His head, not lying with the linen wrappings,” like it was all jumbled up and thrown in a corner, but lying exactly where it had been when it was put on His head.

“So the other disciple who had first come to the tomb entered then also.  He saw and” – what?  “He believed.”  The empty tomb and the grave clothes was all it took Now remember, they at this point have only heard the testimony of Mary Magdalene, right?  They haven’t heard the other women.  They left when Mary told them to leave.  In the meantime, the women came to the tomb, saw Jesus, came back with the story So all they have, all John has is an empty tomb and grave clothes, and that’s enough – that’s enough.  He knew that stone couldn’t be moved from the inside by a dead Jesus.  And he had seen Him dead, he was there.  He knew.  There was no other explanation but that He rose, and he believed.  “For as yet” – or up to that time – “they didn’t understand the Scripture that He must rise again from the dead.”  But he understands it now.  “So the disciples went away again to their own homes.” 

That’s interesting, isn’t it?  I’m sure they didn’t know, “What do we do next?”  So they went home Go back to Luke, and that’s what Luke says Peter did in verse 12 After he saw the linen wrapping also, “he went away to his own home, marveling – marveling at what had happened.”  Hey, this is not a grave robber’s scene, folks.  Grave robbers, if you wanted the body, you just take the body intact, you don’t fool around in there unwrapping it, and then laying everything in perfect order.  You take the body, and you run.  It was very convincing.  John believed.  Peter – still struggling when he goes home.  Meanwhile, the women have these other nine guys on their hands, and they’re trying to convince them that this thing really happened, and they’re not buying it at all Why are they so stubborn?  Go over to verse 19 of Luke 24, this is on the road to Emmaus, and Jesus shows up later that day These two disciples are walking to Emmaus.  Jesus comes, they don’t know who He is, and He starts a conversation with them They’re looking sad.  “Why are you sad?”  Well, verse 19, “Ah, it’s about Jesus the Nazarene, who was a prophet mighty indeed in the Word in the sight of God and all the people, and the chief priests and rulers delivered Him up to the sentence of death and crucified Him.”  And verse 21, “We were hoping that it was He who was going to redeem Israel” – oh boy.  “Besides all this, it’s the third day since these things happened.”  Huh – it’s the third day, they haven’t seen Him.  The women told them He was alive, they don’t buy thatThey don’t believe that.

“It’s the third day, nothing’s happened.  We were hoping it would happen.  And also – this is the throwaway, verse 22 – “some women among us amazed us.  When they were at the tomb early in the morning, didn’t find His body, they came saying they had seen a vision of angels who said that He was alive.  And some of those who were with us went to the tomb” – namely Peter and John – “and found it exactly as the women had also said.  But Him they didn’t see.”  Peter and John didn’t see Him, but they sent word back.  “Hey, we went to the tomb, and He may be alive, but we didn’t see Him.”  They’re still processing this on the side of believing it, but not fully convinced And so this is the reflection of their stubborn unwillingness to believe until they see You know, you fault Thomas because he didn’t believe Remember, he said, “If I don’t see the nails in His hands, and where the spear went into His side, I won’t believe.”  Well, they were just as bad as Thomas They didn’t want to believe the testimony of the women And Peter and John came back and said, “Well, it’s a bizarre deal.  The tomb is open, and the tomb is empty, and the grave clothes are lying there.  And, you know, He may be alive.”  But they’re not ready to fully commit However, before the day is over, He appears to all of them But the reason the Scripture lays out the unbelief of the disciples is to dispel any ridiculous theories that they invented a resurrection because they wanted one so badly That’s just not the case. 

In closing, MacArthur gives us more thoughts about Easter Day:

The resurrection of the Lord Jesus is not the epilogue to the story It is not the epilogue to the life of Christ.  It is the goal of His life, it is the objective of His life, it is the purpose of His life The church has always understood that.  In fact, the church understood it right from the day of the resurrection on.  For since that time, the church has chosen to meet on Sunday, the first day of the week, the day that Jesus rose from the dead, to commemorate the most important event in His life, and the most important event in human history, His resurrection from the dead The church did not choose to meet on Friday.  The church chose to meet on Sunday, because Sunday is the interpretation of Friday.  Easter is the interpretation of Good Friday Resurrection is the divine interpretation of the death of Christ.  Resurrection is the divine vindication of the work that He did on the crossWithout the resurrection, the cross means nothing, for it has no validation, it has no vindication, it has no affirmation.  But when God raised Jesus from the dead, He was affirming, and validating, and vindicating the fact that He had indeed borne our sins in His own body on the cross, and had satisfied the justice of God with His sin-bearing Without the resurrection, the cross is meaningless, just another death.

The resurrection is everything The resurrection vindicates the great reason for the gospel, and for all redemption.  The purpose of the gospel is not just that we might experience the forgiveness of sin.  The purpose of the gospel is that we, having been forgiven of our sin, could enter into eternal life, and live in the bliss of heaven forever, in perfect holiness and perfect joy, in glorified, physical, resurrected bodies.  Bodily resurrection is peculiar to Christianity, and bodily resurrection is essential to Christianity.  The Christian gospel is not designed to deliver you from your troubles here; not at all, not even close.  The Christian gospel is not so that your spirit can float on into eternity in some nebulous way.  The Christian gospel does not promise that you will live on in influence in some way, nor is the gospel saying that Christ lives on in His influence, or Christ lives on in spiritual form.  The Christian message is that Jesus Christ rose from the grave in a glorified, physical body, in some way like the body you have now, only stripped of all that is sinful and fatal; and that we one day will receive a body like unto His glorified body, and we will live in bodily resurrected form through all the eons of eternity That is the Christian message.

That is not the message of the other religions of the world There is no resurrection in Buddhism There is no resurrection of the body in Hinduism, just a recurring, cycling, reincarnation in some different form.  Christianity teaches a bodily resurrection, and that is the goal of redemption, that we might, in glorified human bodies, live forever with our glorified Christ, and serve Him, and worship Him, in joy and peace Christianity promises a physical resurrection.  Now, your body will be different, thankfully.  It will have nothing about it that’s fatal, terminal, nothing about it that’s sinful, or wicked.  Nothing about it that’s imperfect, but it will be a physical body in a glorified form.  You say, “What’s the model for that” the glorified resurrection body of the Lord Jesus It could be seen, it could be touched It had scars He ateHe walkedHe talkedHe thoughtHe heard He acted in that body in ways familiar to those He met.

I hope that this adds to our understanding of Easter.

May we celebrate it in joy and thanksgiving, praising our Lord God for His goodness and favour towards us.

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