You are currently browsing the daily archive for June 11, 2022.

Trinity Sunday is on June 12, 2022.

The readings for Year C — and other resources — can be found here.

The exegesis for the Gospel reading, John 16:12-15, can be found here.

The Epistle is as follows (emphases mine):

Romans 5:1-5

5:1 Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ,

5:2 through whom we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand; and we boast in our hope of sharing the glory of God.

5:3 And not only that, but we also boast in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance,

5:4 and endurance produces character, and character produces hope,

5:5 and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.

Commentary comes from Matthew Henry and John MacArthur.

In Romans 4, Paul discussed Abraham’s unswerving faith in believing everything that God promised him. He also obeyed, doing everything that God asked him to do. As such, God imputed righteousness to Abraham.

Two years ago, I wrote about Romans 4:6-12. The second half of Romans 4:9 reads:

For we say that faith was counted to Abraham as righteousness.

Matthew Henry’s commentary introduces Romans 5 as follows:

The apostle, having made good his point, and fully proved justification by faith, in this chapter proceeds in the explication, illustration, and application of that truth. I. He shows the fruits of justification, Romans 5:1-5

The precious benefits and privileges which flow from justification are such as should quicken us all to give diligence to make it sure to ourselves that we are justified, and then to take the comfort it renders to us, and to do the duty it calls for from us. The fruits of this tree of life are exceedingly precious.

Paul begins by saying that, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ (verse 1).

Let us look at the word ‘peace’ in the divine meaning of the word.

Twice in the past few weeks — on Pentecost Sunday and earlier on the Sixth Sunday of Easter — we have had two readings featuring John 14:27:

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.

Through His crucifixion and resurrection, Jesus reconciled us to the Father, thereby bringing us divine, everlasting peace.

Henry says that we have this peace because Jesus has redeemed our sins:

We have peace with God,Romans 5:1; Romans 5:1. It is sin that breeds the quarrel between us and God, creates not only a strangeness, but an enmity; the holy righteous God cannot in honour be at peace with a sinner while he continues under the guilt of sin. Justification takes away the guilt, and so makes way for peace. And such are the benignity and good-will of God to man that, immediately upon the removing of that obstacle, the peace is made. By faith we lay hold of God’s arm and of his strength, and so are at peace, Isaiah 27:4; Isaiah 27:5. There is more in this peace than barely a cessation of enmity, there is friendship and loving-kindness, for God is either the worst enemy or the best friend. Abraham, being justified by faith, was called the friend of God (James 2:23), which was his honour, but not his peculiar honour: Christ has called his disciples friends, John 15:13-15. And surely a man needs no more to make him happy than to have God his friend! But this is through our Lord Jesus Christ–through him as the great peace-maker, the Mediator between God and man, that blessed Day’s-man that has laid his hand upon us both.

John MacArthur explains the strength of God’s anger with unbelievers:

God is at war with men whether they’re conscious of their own animosity toward Him or not. In fact, the background of this concept of peace is Romans l and 2. And that tells us about the wrath of God, doesn’t it? Romans l:l8: “The wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men who hold the truth in unrighteousness.” You see, it’s God who’s at war with the ungodly and the unrighteous, and those who do not know Christ. In fact, God even says if you don’t embrace Jesus Christ you are anathema, you are cursed.

This is why Jesus issued the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-20):

16 Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. 17 When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. 18 Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. 19 Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, 20 and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

Luke wrote another form of the Great Commission (Luke 24:47), which was read on Ascension Day, ten days before Pentecost:

repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem.

Paul says that through Jesus Christ we have obtained access to this divine grace in which we abide, and we boast — or rejoice — in our hope of sharing the glory of God (verse 2).

Jesus wants others to be brought to faith as well so that they, too, repent, realise that their sins are forgiven and come to know this same divine grace and hope of life eternal.

MacArthur elaborates further:

God is not on the side of sinners. God is not on the side of Christ rejecters. He is their enemy and He seeks their destruction

God was appeased, as it were, for all of His vengeance and all of His anger and all of His wrath, found its full fury on Christ on the cross, did it not? And we have peace with God. Boy, that is good to know. That’s my new status and it flows out of the reconciliation accomplished by the work of Jesus Christ. You see, in Christ our sin was penalized, as it were. In Christ there was the full payment and God was propitiated, God was satisfied. The price was paid. And that’s why it says in Colossians I, “Having made peace through the blood of His cross”

Now, so we introduce into the concept of justification the concept of reconciliation. And may I say for you who are thinking theology with me, justification and reconciliation are distinguishable as terms, but they are inseparable as reality because justification embraces reconciliation. That’s the message of chapter 5. Justification embraces sanctification, that’s the message of chapter 6 and chapter 7. Justification embraces glorification, that’s the message of chapter 8.

So that justification, although it can be distinguished in terms of just the words from these other things, is utterly inseparable from them in reality. And so when you embrace Jesus Christ by faith and are justified, inherent in that justification is not only glorification to come, sanctification immediately to begin its process, but reconciliation to God

And in II Corinthians 5 it says He not only reconciled us to God but He gave us the ministry of reconciliation and that is to go out and preach the gospel to others who need to be reconciled.

MacArthur then discusses the security we have in our justification and our salvation.

When I was a Catholic, we were told that certain religious observances — e.g. going to Confession, receiving Communion — put us in a state of grace but that, once we sinned, we fell out of that state of grace until the next time.

However, the New Testament tells us that is not true.

MacArthur explains that Jesus keeps us in that state of grace, even when we sin, as all of us do:

Now listen to this, very important. He not only reconciled us to God initially, but He maintains that reconciliation. And that is His high priestly work. You understand that? First John l says: “He keeps on cleansing us from all (What?) sin.” You see, the continual cleansing, the continual mediation, the continual washing of our sin provides for us the maintaining of that reconciliation. Do you see? So you have two tremendous truths that cannot really be perceived. On the one hand we are at peace with God forever because every sin we will ever commit was already borne by Christ. And so there is nothing to violate our reconciliation, for the sin for which we should be cast out was paid for and covered. And even in the daily walking through the world as we sin the Lord keeps on cleansing and keeps on cleansing so then we are maintained in reconciliation, not only by the past act of Christ on the cross, but by the present mediation of Christ at the right hand of God. His high priestly ministry says He ever lives to make what? Intercession for us. Isn’t that great? I’m at peace with God.

For how long? For as long as Jesus Christ lives. And how long does He live? Forever. He intercedes for us. When a person embraces Christ by faith the spotless Son of God makes that person one with God and he’s at peace.

Therefore, we rejoice — boast — of that wonderful state of being.

Both commentators put emphasis on the word ‘access’ in verse 2.

Henry says:

1. The saints’ happy state. It is a state of grace, God’s loving-kindness to us and our conformity to God; he that hath God’s love and God’s likeness is in a state of grace … Prosagogen eschekamenWe have had access. He speaks of those that have been already brought out of a state of nature into a state of grace … 2. Their happy standing in this state: wherein we stand. Not only wherein we are, but wherein we stand, a posture that denotes our discharge from guilt; we stand in the judgment (Psalms 1:5), not cast, as convicted criminals, but our dignity and honour secured, not thrown to the ground, as abjects. The phrase denotes also our progress; while we stand, we are going. We must not lie down, as if we had already attained, but stand as those that are pressing forward, stand as servants attending on Christ our master. The phrase denotes, further, our perseverance: we stand firmly and safely, upheld by the power of God; stand as soldiers stand, that keep their ground, not borne down by the power of the enemy. It denotes not only our admission to, but our confirmation in, the favour of God.

MacArthur says:

Circle that word in your Bible. “We have access by faith into this grace in which we stand.” Stop right there. The first link that secures us eternally to the Savior is peace with God. The second one is standing in grace, standing in grace. We aren’t moving in and out of grace. We’re what? Standing in it. We’re not coming and going through it. We’re standing in it, standing in grace and the… My feeble brain can’t touch the boundaries of this truth. It is so vast and so profound and every word is powerful. Start with “by whom.” By whom? Jesus Christ, everything is because of Him.

The key thought in the whole text is the mediation of Jesus Christ, through His marvelous mediation. By His death He brings us to God and to peace. And notice this, and it says:  “By whom also we have access by faith,” again. Now let me just stop on this word “access.”

That’s a monumental word. It’s a staggering word. It is a shocking word. It is an infinitely incomprehensible word. It is a word that is beyond the purview of a Jew to even conceive that anybody on earth could have access to God. Why?  Because everything a Jew had ever known all his life was that God is the utterly holy and unapproachable one. Didn’t he know that?  Didn’t he believe that? Throughout all their history that’s all they knew. And by the way, the word “access” here, this word is used three times. It is used here and it is used in Ephesians 2:18 and 3:12 and it always speaks of access to God. He’s given us access to God. And a Jew just never knew that.

Even the ancient Jewish priests could go into the Holy of Holies only on the Day of Atonement and only for a few seconds, because God told the Jews that those who approached Him would be struck dead. MacArthur’s sermon has all the relevant verses. And, yes, people did die.

However, with the death of Christ on the cross, that evening, the veil to the Holy of Holies at the temple in Jerusalem was rent asunder (Matthew 27:51).

Jesus, through His obedience to the Father, tore the veil, so that we may now approach His Father in confidence as His sons and daughters.

Now let’s look at ‘boasting’, or ‘rejoicing’ in some translations.

MacArthur tells us:

The third link, verse 2 again, ”We have access by faith into the grace in which we stand, and we rejoice,” or we exult, or actually we boast, we make our boast, “in hope of the glory of God.” The third link in our security is hope of glory.

We are secure because we have peace with God. We are secure because we stand in grace. And we are secure because we have been given the hope of glory. In other words, to put it another way, God has promised us future glory, right? He promised. Does God keep His promises? He is the God who cannot lie. And we will enter into that glory in the future

Now watch this, so He isn’t predestining the initiation, He is predestining the completion. Do you understand that? We are predestined not to start, but we are predestined to what? To finish. We are not predestined to be incomplete but predestined to be complete. And so, in verse 30: “Whom He did predestinate, them He also called.

And whom He called, them He also justified. And whom He justified them He also (What?) glorified.” There’s no loss, because if you’re predestined to begin, you’re predestined to end. If you’re predestined to start, you’re predestined to finish. If you’re predestined to be in Christ, you’re predestined to be like Christ. Isn’t that a marvelous truth? You see, that’s the securing reality of the hope of the believer. And the doctrine of security is based on the hope of glory.

Because we have that hope in the promise of glory in the future, we are able to boast — rejoice, exult — in our present sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance (verse 3), one of Paul’s favourite words, which would have resonated with his audience because of the ancient endurance races, some of which we see in the Olympics.

In other words, for the believer, earthly trials, as physically or psychologically painful as they are, will not be everlasting. We will be with God one day.

Henry says that our sufferings are refinements, as tests are on precious metals to purify them:

the patient sufferers have the greatest experience of the divine consolations, which abound as afflictions abound. It works an experience of ourselves. It is by tribulation that we make an experiment of our own sincerity, and therefore such tribulations are called trials. It works, dokimenan approbation, as he is approved that has passed the test. Thus Job’s tribulation wrought patience, and that patience produced an approbation, that still he holds fast his integrity, Job 2:3.

Paul goes on to say that endurance produces character, and character produces hope (verse 4).

Henry continues with the analogy of purifying precious metals:

He who, being thus tried, comes forth as gold, will thereby be encouraged to hope. This experiment, or approbation, is not so much the ground, as the evidence, of our hope, and a special friend to it.

A secular version of this is: whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. It builds character.

MacArthur explains:

It would be much like we use the term sterling, sterling silver, or when we say about someone’s character, they’re a sterling character. We mean there’s no flaws, there’s no impurities. You see, the pressure takes all that out of us. Why? Because we learn to trust God in the trials, we learn to trust God in the stress, we learn to trust God in the pain. And tribulation is not a problem for us. For one thing it’s an honor to suffer for Christ, isn’t it? For another thing it is a joy to learn to experience His sustaining power in the middle of suffering. It increases our faith. It purges us. It sanctifies us. It washes us. It strengthens us. It’s like spiritual weight lifting. It builds our muscles. It raises our level of holiness. And so, we look at tribulation and we rejoice in that also. We’re not just saying, hey, pie in the sky, by and by, folks, we’re just hanging on for dear life till we can get to the glory land. We’re not moaning and groaning here with all of the struggle and hoping for that heaven; we’re even rejoicing right here because the process of trouble is building proven character, purging out the flaws, purging out the dross.

James talks about this, doesn’t he? “And blessed is a man that endures testing, for when he is tried he’ll receive a crown.”

It’s part of the purifying. Now listen, that’s James 1:12, the reason we enjoy the suffering, the reason we’re patiently enduring it, is because it’s building proven character and sterling character, and more flawless character. And the stronger we grow spiritually, the richer our hope becomes, the greater our rejoicing. Why? Because the greater the reward that awaits us there, the greater the joy to receive it and cast it at the feet of Jesus Christ. Great truth.

Back to the hope we have in God’s promises. Paul says that this hope does not disappoint us, because the Holy Spirit, which the Father gave us, pours His — the Father’s — love into our hearts (verse 5).

Instead of ‘disappoint’ some translations use ‘ashamed’, as in not being ashamed of this hope of divine promise.

Henry says:

Sense of God’s love to us will make us not ashamed, either of our hope in him or our sufferings for him.

MacArthur concludes:

And here’s the wrap-up on hope. “Hope makes not (What?) ashamed.” What it really means is hope is never disappointed. You don’t have to be ashamed of God. And you say, ah, I put all my faith in that God, I put all my faith in that Jesus Christ and He deceived me, He never came through, and I lost everything and what a deceiver, I’m ashamed that I ever mentioned that name. No, you’ll never come to that point. Hope is not going to be ashamed, not when it’s put in Jesus Christ. Hope is never disappointed. It will never be ashamed. It will never be disappointed. Why? Because it will receive the promised anticipated glory; that’s what it’s saying.

Because we are at peace with God through Christ’s death on the cross, because we stand in grace, we have a promised future glory. And I don’t blush to say that’s my hope. I’m not ashamed to say to anybody on the face of the earth, I’m going to be in glory with Jesus Christ some day, radiating the eternal glory of God throughout the eternal Jerusalem. That’s my destiny. That’s where I’m going, and I’m not going to be ashamed, because hope in God, hope in the Lord Jesus Christ is never disappointing.

May everyone reading this have a blessed Trinity Sunday.

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