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Bible kevinroosecomThe three-year Lectionary that many Catholics and Protestants hear in public worship gives us a great variety of Holy Scripture.

Yet, it doesn’t tell the whole story.

My series Forbidden Bible Verses — ones the Lectionary editors and their clergy omit — examines the passages we do not hear in church. These missing verses are also Essential Bible Verses, ones we should study with care and attention. Often, we find that they carry difficult messages and warnings.

Today’s reading is from the English Standard Version with commentary by Matthew Henry and John MacArthur.

Philippians 3:1-4a

Righteousness Through Faith in Christ

Finally, my brothers,[a] rejoice in the Lord. To write the same things to you is no trouble to me and is safe for you.

Look out for the dogs, look out for the evildoers, look out for those who mutilate the flesh. For we are the circumcision, who worship by the Spirit of God[b] and glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh— though I myself have reason for confidence in the flesh also.

——————————————————————————–

Last week’s post was about Epaphroditus, a member of the Philippian congregation who went to Rome to minister to Paul and was returning home.

Philippians 3 begins with warnings to the congregation about false teachers, Judaizers in particular, but also the qualities of a true Christian.

This is a long post. John MacArthur preached five sermons on these four verses alone, so grab yourselves a snack and a cuppa.

Paul encourages the Philippians to rejoice in the Lord, adding that it is no trouble at all to repeat himself in writing that (verse 1).

‘Finally’ in that verse can also be taken as ‘furthermore’, because the Apostle has some things to add to what he has already said previously.

John MacArthur elaborates on that verse:

Paul says, “Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord.” We noted that that finally would better be translated “furthermore,” or “so then,” or “now then.” It is a transition, not a note that distinguishes the end, as 44 remaining verses might indicate to you. And he throws in this which is the basic theme of the epistle that comes through in every chapter, “Finally, my brethren, rejoice in the Lord.” He is simply punctuating here this theme of joy. He lays down this very simple principle that our rejoicing is connected to a relationship. Rejoice in the Lord. And as I said, that is a familiar theme. It’s in chapter 1 verse 4, chapter 2 verse 2, chapter 2 verses 17 and 18, verses 28 and 29, you’ll find it here in chapter 3 and again in chapter 4, you’ll find it in verses 4 and 10. So he is reminding them about joy. But here he adds for the first time the little phrase “in the Lord…in the Lord.” It is the sphere in which our joy exists. Only in Him is true joy found…nowhere else. And let me just speak to that issue, if I might, for a moment. Paul is not talking about happiness when he talks about joy and rejoicing. Happiness is from hap…hap is a circumstance, happenstance, happenings, happiness, all the same word group. That is to say happiness is an emotion or an exhilaration associated with certain events. It is not an emotion or an exhilaration associated with a relationship. It has to do with an event, a thing, a happening. So the kind of joy that Paul is talking about and calling for, and this by the way is a command, and the command implies the capability of obedience on the part of a believer which in itself is no doubt a test of true salvation. But he says…rejoice in the Lord…commanding us to joy. But it is not the kind of emotional outburst, good feeling, exhilaration that is associated with an event. It is the kind that is associated with a relationship. It doesn’t even say, “Rejoice because of what the Lord has given you…rejoice because of what the Lord will give you…rejoice because of what the Lord is giving you.” It doesn’t say, “Rejoice because of what the Lord has done for the people that you care about.” It says, “Rejoice in the Lord.”

It is the exhilaration in the relationship, perhaps the simplest human analogy to it would be the joy of a parent in a newborn baby. The baby gives nothing, in effect, the baby provides no stimulating events. In fact, most of the events connected with the baby are anything but stimulating. The baby provides no exciting gifts, makes no charitable contribution, does no particularly beneficial service but there is something about the relationship that literally exhilarates the soul. It is the same kind of emotion only in much greater and deeper proportion as that of falling in love. And it isn’t so much that your emotion and your exhilaration and your exuberance and that overwhelming sense of silly peace that you enjoy is related to what the one you love does for you as it is just the thought of the one you love. And extrapolating out of those irrepressible human joys that come out of relationship, we can magnify that concept in to what we ought to feel and ever rejoice in that we enjoy with the Lord Himself.

MacArthur tells us more about joy:

Now let me take it a step further. This kind of joy is not an emotion from a human level, it is produced by the Holy Spirit therefore it is a supernatural emotion. It is a supernatural emotion. You say, “Well what does it do? What does it feel like, this joy that we’re to have?” Well it produces a deep confidence in the future, built on trust. The relationship says my life is in God’s hands, my life is in Christ’s control, all is well. The hymn writer said, “It is well with my soul,” and it is so well with my soul that no matter what is going on around me, I have joy. It is the kind of joy that brings a silent sleep, a deep sleep, a quietness of life because it trusts, because it knows the sovereign God and the faithful Christ will accomplish all their good promise. It is a supernatural emotion that also could be described as the absence of any ultimate fear because what is there to fear when all is bound up in the relationship and the relationship is eternal. It is the kind of emotion that puts a melody in the heart that no matter how bad it is in the world, it’s almost as if we ride across the top of the bumps. It’s the kind of emotion that puts a song on the lips, a lightness to the step. It’s the kind of emotion that produces easy thanks for little things…small pleasures. It’s very different from happiness. It’s different from the happiness, for example, of good health because true joy persists in weakness, pain, illness and death. It is different from the fun of a party with its laughing friends and music because it persists in the dark when someone is all alone. It is different from the delight of a new house or a new car or a new dress or a new anything because it persists through the loss of everything. Why? Because it is the joy in the relationship and the relationship with Jesus Christ that we enjoy never changes…never changes. He is always present. He is ever close. He is ever loving. He is ever securing. He is ever strengthening. He is ever providing. And we trust Him. Rejoice in the Lord. Very different than happiness.

Paul cautions the Philippians to beware of the dogs, the evildoers and those who would mutilate the flesh (verse 2).

By ‘dogs’, Paul meant wild dogs.

MacArthur tells us:

“Beware of the dogs.” Boy, you just didn’t call people dogs in that world. Two words in the New Testament for dogs, both from the same root. One is kunarion, that means a little dog, a little pet dog. It’s a diminutive term, it’s used in Matthew 15:26 and 27, and Mark chapter 7 around verse 27. It means a little diminutive pet dog. The word here is kuon, that word does not mean a pet dog. That word is used of dogs that were not pets and most of the dogs in that culture were not pets. They were scavengers. And there are many many histories that you can read about that day and you can look it up in a biblical encyclopedia and find it. Dogs roamed the streets. Dogs were scrounges, they were scavengers. They roamed in packs. They hunted the garbage of the city. They were often rabid. They snarled. They were wild. Would literally prowl the ancient streets without an owner and without home, they would feed on the garbage, on the filth. They would fight one another. They would attack people. In some cases people would lose their lives because the dogs were diseased.

To show you something of the character of these kinds of dogs, do you remember the parable of the rich man and Lazarus? And you remember in that story that part of the torture of Lazarus was that he was sick and in his poverty he was lying in the street and it says the dogs were…what?…licking his sores, the filthy vile scroungy scavenger dogs of the street, unimaginably licking the sores of this poor beggar. In the book of Revelation when it wants to identify the people who are not allowed into the gate of the holy city, in Revelation 22:15 it says, “Outside are the dogs.” They are not the warm and fuzzy little diminutives that we have as pets. These dogs were very very different. They were the lowest of the low, the scavengers, the scoundrels, the useless filthy curs that moved in the streets and were a threat to people and children.

And because they were so base and such filthy animals, the Jews had come to use the term “dog” as a title for Gentiles. In fact, the Talmud says the nations of the world are like dogs. The Gentiles were dogs, Gentile dogs, unclean, filthy, scrounging scavengers who savagedly attacked the truth and were dangerous.

And so, the Jews would see the Gentiles as dogs. The Judaizers trying to protect the Jewishness that was so precious to them would see even the Gentile Christians as dogs until they went through a circumcision. Jews called Gentiles dogs.

What is startling here is that Paul, a Jew, calls Jews dogs. That’s turning the table. That is a serious statement. You wonder sometimes why Paul was not popular. That statement would not make him popular…not popular. He is saying, in effect, beware of those people who self-righteously call other dogs but they’re the dogs. They accuse others of shamelessly attacking the truth and they are shamelessly attacking the truth. Are dogs unclean and filthy? So are they. Are dogs snarling and howling and vicious? So are they. Are dogs dangerous and able to wound and even kill? So are they. Stay away from them. Stay away from those dangerous filthy snarling howling wild attacking false teachers who parade themselves as if they are the virtuous ones, but they are deadly, they are dangerous, they are dirty. And he’s talking about people who are religious. He’s talking about people who say we must obey the law of God.

Listen, anybody who comes along in this time and day and says you have to baptized in water to be saved is a dangerous dog. Anybody who comes along in this day and says in order to be saved you’ve got to go through some certain kind of ceremony, you’ve got to say some certain kinds of prayers, you’ve got to go through some kind of a ritual is a dog, an unclean thing, a dangerous beast. Anyone who comes along to you and says it’s fine if you believe in Jesus but if you don’t acquiesce to a certain code of ethics and do your best to live by that code of ethics and perform those deeds which will please God you will never be saved is a dog. Beware.

As for evildoers, MacArthur explains:

They are evil workers. You see, the thing is they pride themselves on being workers of righteousness. That’s how he turns the table on them this time. Typically those who are involved in those kinds of external religions of works see themselves as the workers of what is good, that they please God, they’re earning His favor, they’re earning salvation. They’re the noble upholders of the ceremonies and the rituals of their religion … and they’ve done the good deeds and they’ve filled up all their agenda with those required things. And they’ve done all that good. And the fact of the matter is they are not good workers, they are…what?…they’re evil workers. Well, you say, “Why so?” Because it is the wickedness of all wickedness to think that you can earn anything with God. Why is that wicked? Because it is pride at its apex and pride is a…what?…sin. Unregenerate people, even religious people can’t do really what is good. Let me put it to you simply. Wicked people can do bad bad. Remember our discussion of that? Bad bad. You say, “What’s that?” They do bad things for bad reasons. You say, “What’s a bad thing?” Any kind of sin. They can do wicked things. And they do them with bad reasons, bad motives. They’re motivated by their wicked selfish self-centered nature. Now listen to this, unregenerate people can also do bad good. You say, “What do you mean by that?” Well it’s good in the sense that they can help the poor, they can relieve the widows, they can visit the prisoners, they can adopt orphans, they can do good. But it’s bad good because it’s motivated by pride rather than the glory of God. The best that the unregenerate can do is bad good. They can do bad bad or bad good. But only the redeemed can do good good…a good deed motivated to the glory of God.

MacArthur tells us what Paul meant by mutilation:

Then finally he literally scorches them with the blowtorch of terms. He says, “Beware of the mutilation.” This is unbelievable. You talk about offensive, that is offensive. You see, they prided themselves on circumcision. The word for circumcision in the Greek is peritome, it means to cut around. Paul says you’re not the circumcision, you’re the katatome, you’re the mutilation, you’re the castration, that’s what you are. Boy! You think you’re circumcised? You think you fit God’s design in the symbolism of circumcision? Forget it, there’s nothing spiritual about it. All it was was physical mutilation. In Galatians 5:12 he says, “You say you’re circumcised? I would that you were castrated,” Galatians 5:12. Very strong. You see, we can’t just say to these people who add works to salvation, “Well, they’re close. Boy, they’re certainly lovely people. They certainly are nice. And they’re religious. And, you know, they’re trying their best to get to God.” They are dogs. Beware of them. They’re filthy. They’re unclean. They’re vicious. They are not workers of good. They are doing at best bad good, motivated by their own pride. And they go through their religious ceremonies and they are useless, they have nothing to do with their heart and their life and their relation to God. They’re simply external. It is merely a process of mutilation with no spiritual value, no inner cleansing, no spiritual change. Why? Because that’s all of grace and nothing more, right? Nothing more. And as soon as you stick anything else in there, all is lost.

In fact, these people called the mutilation who thought they could come to God through circumcision had to be told that their circumcision was of no more value than the gashings of the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel. You remember them? Up there with Elijah, cutting themselves, gashing and mutilating themselves, trying to please their deity…absolutely useless. So is circumcision. So is any external thing that does not reflect a transformed heart. He is not a Jew who is one outwardly. He is a Jew who is one…what?…inwardly. Romans 2:28, “For circumcision is of the heart.” What’s Paul’s message here? He’s saying…Look, we’re the true circumcision. How are we characterized? All internally. We worship in the Spirit of God, we glory in Christ Jesus. Who gets all the glory for our salvation? Christ. Our worship isn’t external, it’s…what?…it’s in the Spirit. He gets all the glory and how much confidence do we have in our flesh? None. That’s the difference. You see, they worship on the outside, they glory in their human achievement, their religious activity and they have a lot of confidence in the flesh. They think it can perform. So Paul leads us then to verse 3, and an understanding of the explicit qualities of the true Christian.

So what is it when these religionists do all of their ceremonies and all of their activities and by their own works try to attain the favor of God? It is bad good. It may appear good on the outside, it is bad on the inside because it is nothing but the expulsion of pride which believes that you can please God on your own. They are merit-mongers.

The Judaizers were among them. Evil workers trying to earn God’s favor. It doesn’t mean that they were doing evil deeds, they were working to please God but they were evil because it was all motivated by the false belief that they could be pleasing to God. What a deception of pride.

So Paul flips the table and says you’re evil workers, everything you do is wicked, everything you do is bad. Why? Because they did it out of the allusion of pride and pride is the driving sin of unregenerate man.

MacArthur explains that, in the Old Testament, God intended circumcision to be an outward sign for the Jewish people to use to become pure in heart. God wanted it to remind them of their sinful nature. Note that the male’s blood had to be shed when he was eight days old (emphases mine):

When God demanded that they circumcise the male, He was giving them a symbol that the…the outward part of man’s procreative organ was cleansed to remind them that man needed to be cleansed of sin at the deepest root of his being. That was the idea. Man needed to be cleansed of his sin through a spiritual surgery, at the very root of his nature. And that very graphic symbol was chosen because that is the procreative point at which man produces sinful man. So man in his natural condition is a sinner and he produces sinners, sinners, sinners, sinners and nothing but sinners. At the very point of his nature then he needs cleansing. And every time they circumcised a person and every time they circumcised a little eight-day-old male child, they were reminding themselves of the fact that man at his very base nature was a wicked sinner and desperately in need of a cleansing. It was an illustration of the sinfulness of man. And even the bloodshed that occurred in circumcision could symbolize the need for sacrifice to accomplish that cleansing. So there was even a picture of the pain and the sacrifice in the circumcision as well

Leviticus 26:41 talks about the circumcised heart. Deuteronomy 10:16, the circumcised heart. Deuteronomy 30 verse 6, the circumcised heart. Jeremiah 4:4, the circumcised heart. Ezekiel 44:7, the circumcised heart. That starts all the way back in Exodus 6…Leviticus, Deuteronomy, the Pentateuch already when God said, “I want an outward sign,” He was saying, “I also want an inward reality.” A circumcised foreskin can only be a sign of the need for a circumcised heart, a cleansed heart. But it wasn’t long after God instituted it that they had already begun to deteriorate and that’s why you have those passages where God says circumcise your hearts. That’s why those are there because already the thing began to deteriorate and all they were living by was the physical sign and disregarding the spiritual counterpart.

When the Judaizers came along after Paul left one of his new churches — this happened nearly all the time — they told the new Christians, many of whom were Gentiles, that the men needed circumcision, because only then could they obey the law. However, as we know, the New Covenant has done away with physical circumcision and focuses on a spiritual circumcision — one of the heart and mind with the help of divine grace and the workings of the Holy Spirit.

Paul says that ‘we’ — true Christians — are the circumcision, because we worship by the Spirit of God, glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh (verse 3) for salvation.

‘Confidence in the flesh’ means a works-based religious system, which is still very much active today.

MacArthur explains:

… not only is the true believer characterized by worship, by rejoicing in Christ, but thirdly by humility…humility. That’s the…that is the basic attitude of a genuine believer…“He puts no confidence in the flesh.” Very humble by the fallen condition of his human flesh. He doesn’t trust it. He doesn’t trust in it. He began in the Spirit and he will continue in the Spirit. He knows that all the good that comes to him and through him is by the power of God, he has no confidence in his flesh to please God. He knows it can’t. So there’s a humility there. There is not a pushing of one’s merit, of one’s achievement, but there’s humility.

How do you identify a true Christian? Look for one who worships from the heart that’s prompted by the Spirit. Look for one whose glory and joy and boast is all Christ. Look for one who when viewing himself is humble.

MacArthur elaborates on ‘glory’ in the Greek manuscript:

That…that verb in the Greek, “to glory,” kauchaomai basically means to boast but it has the idea of a rejoicing exultant, almost a hilarious kind of boasting. And what it’s saying here is that if you’re a true Christian all your boasting, all your rejoicing is going to be in Christ because all the credit belongs to Him. So you haven’t done anything to earn it.

He tells us what it means to ‘worship by the Spirit of God’:

Listen, the first thing is an overflowing heart of worship Ask yourself, does my heart long to glorify the Lord? Do I love to praise Him and worship Him? Is it my heart’s desire to serve Him? ... But the question you want to ask is what is my attitude toward God? Because if I’m a Christian the Spirit is in me and if the Spirit is in me, then He is prompting me to worship. And so I’ll have a heart of adoration and a heart of praise and a heart that longs to serve God from the inside out. So I have to look at my heart. And so when the Scripture says “examine yourselves,” it starts there in the heart. Oh yes, there will be a moral code by which you live. And there may have been a real event, there was for all of us a time when we were saved, even though we don’t know it. And we do have to know the facts. And service will be a part of our life but all of that will flow from the inside because we worship God prompted by the Spirit. It’s worship on a supernatural level, it’s not human, it’s spiritual, it’s energized by the Holy Spirit.

Then Paul refers to his Jewish heritage, saying that he has reason for confidence in the flesh also (verse 4a).

Let’s look at the whole verse:

though I myself have reason for confidence in the flesh also. If anyone else thinks he has reason for confidence in the flesh, I have more:

It is possible that the Judaizers talking to the Philippians might have thought Paul was a Gentile and therefore, the congregation needed education on the Old Testament laws.

Paul states that, as a Pharisee, he knew the system inside and out.

MacArthur says:

“Although I myself might have confidence even in the flesh.” The end of verse 3 says, “Christians, don’t put any confidence in the flesh, although I myself…that’s an emphatic form there…might have confidence even in the flesh.” I mean, it’s not that I don’t know what I’m talking about. Listen, if there was confidence in the flesh I might have it. I might have it. If anyone else has a mind to put confidence in the flesh, I far more than anyone else. Literally to a higher degree. Certainly to a higher degree than most if not all of the Judaizers who were plaguing Philippi. So he is saying if there was anybody who should have confidence in the flesh legitimately, it would be me. And if anybody else has a mind to have confidence in the flesh, I have more reason to have it.

Now he’s not saying this to build his ego. He’s not saying this to convince people of his spiritual superiority. He is simply saying it for the sake of argument. He doesn’t really want to boast in his flesh. He doesn’t really have any confidence in his flesh. In 2 Corinthians read chapter 11 verse 16 through chapter 12 verse 1 some time and he uses the same argument of boasting there but he calls it foolish. It’s foolish to boast, I only do it for the sake of making a point, just for the sake of argument. He says, “If anybody might boast in the flesh it would be me because of my impeccable Jewish credentials, my religious credentials.”

You see, he knew what it was to be a Jew, to be a Jew in the highest sense of the term and yet he deliberately knowingly willingly abandoned it all for the sake of Jesus Christ. He counted it all as worthless. He sold it all to gain the true treasure, the true pearl, even Christ. Now in verses 4 to 7 he tells what was loss and in verses 8 to 11 what was gain. And in the middle is Christ. He says this is what was loss, verses 4 to 7, and this is what was gain in Christ. I gave up all this stuff and this is what I gained.

Here are the next several verses, which are in the Lectionary:

circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law,[c] blameless. But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ. Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith 10 that I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death, 11 that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead.

Straining Toward the Goal

12 Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect, but I press on to make it my own, because Christ Jesus has made me his own. 13 Brothers, I do not consider that I have made it my own. But one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, 14 I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.

From that we see that obligatory works, circumcision and rituals are empty actions:

So he’s saying I was born into Jewishness, I was born into the Jewish faith. I followed the rituals from the very beginning. I started with the most essential rite and sacrament which they felt was absolutely necessary for salvation. So he said I look at that circumcision that you see as so vital to salvation and I’m telling you it’s rubbish…it’s rubbish. Because salvation is not by ritual, it is not by rite, it is not by ceremony, it is not by symbol, it is not by sacraments, it is not by masses, it is not by routines and rituals and washings and baptisms. I don’t care whether you’re talking about Jewish symbols and Jewish sacraments and Jewish ordinances and rituals and ceremonies or whether you’re talking about Roman Catholic ones, Roman Catholic rites and rituals, or whether you’re talking about Protestant baptism or Protestant sacraments or the Lord’s table or some other ritual, or whether you’re talking about lighting candles or praying through beads or praying certain formula prayers, ceremonies, rites and rituals don’t bring salvation. That’s what he’s saying. So I considered that truest Jewish rite of all rites, circumcision, as manure. As far as salvation is concerned it’s useless. It’s waste, it’s garbage, throw it out, it can’t help.

Secondly, he says salvation is not by race either. If anybody had a right to boast I might because not only was I circumcised the eighth day, but I am of the nation of Israel. The implication here is that some of the Judaizers probably were Gentiles converted later. They were circumcised later in life and they weren’t really of the nation Israel. They were proselytes. But Paul is saying, “I’m of the people of Israel” …

And I’ll tell you right now the Jews believed that if they were circumcised the eighth day and if they were of the pure line coming out of the loins of Jacob and coming through the twelve tribes that were the children of Jacob, they were therefore the chosen people of God who were the saved, the redeemed, the inheriters of eternal glory. Paul says…the fact of the matter is, that’s useless, that is absolutely useless.

No religious virtue is gained by birth. Understand that? There are people today who want to affirm household salvation. They twist the Philippian jailer’s story that he was saved and his whole household and they assumed that when a family…when parents are saved that the children born of those parents are in covenant relationship to God. And that’s why they engage in infant baptism which is a form of covenant identity. Infant baptism is how you identify a child as having been born into covenant identity, household salvation by virtue of parents. Not so…not so. Your religious family grants you no standing with God. The fact that you were born into a Christian nation grants you no standing with God. The fact that you were born into a Christian family grants you no standing with God, no salvation, it’s useless, it’s garbage, it’s rubbish.

As MacArthur says above, once we devote our hearts to God through His Son Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit, whatever good we do comes from Him and our spontaneous actions will reflect that:

all of that will flow from the inside because we worship God prompted by the Spirit. It’s worship on a supernatural level, it’s not human, it’s spiritual, it’s energized by the Holy Spirit.

Paul has more on that, which will be the subject of next week’s post.

Next time — Philippians 3:15-16

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