You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Ben Carson’ tag.

I intend to return to my reviews of Cannes restaurants.

However, so many strange news stories have appeared that it is worth taking note of a few.

Apple bans LifeSite News

Today, I happened across this tweet:

On July 31, LifeSite News reported:

A little over one week ago, Apple approved LifeSiteNews’ application to publish our news on their Apple News platform.

Today, without warning, Apple News abruptly reversed course, telling LifeSite that they had deleted our channel and all of our content from their platform.

Apple claimed that LifeSite’s channel “didn’t comply with our Apple News guidelines.” Specifically, they stated that LifeSite’s “[c]hannel content shows intolerance towards a specific group.”

Planned Parenthood, perhaps?

Apple would not say:

“We don’t yet know the reason for Apple’s decision to delete our channel,” said LifeSiteNews Editor-in-Chief John-Henry Westen. “However, at a time when there is growing evidence that tech juggernauts are engaging in concerted censorship against even mainstream conservative viewpoints, Apple’s decision – made unilaterally, and without opportunity to appeal – is frightening.”

“It goes without saying that LifeSite would never promote intolerance or hatred against any group,” Westen continued. “However, in our current divisive political climate, even mild expressions of common conservative viewpoints are often written off as de facto hatred and intolerance. We certainly hope that this is not what Apple is doing. However, we urge our readers to contact Apple, and to respectfully demand that they reinstate LifeSite’s channel.”

Anyone who would like to support LifeSite in being reinstated can sign their petition.

LifeSite first applied to be listed on Apple News in November 2018. It took six months before they were accepted. Now they have been denied.

This is pure censorship.

Think of it this way:

El Paso shooting

Speaking of guns, Karl ‘Market Ticker’ Denninger has an excellent essay on the El Paso shooting, which took place on Saturday, August 3, 2019.

‘On El Paso’ is worth reading in full. Denninger makes salient points about the American shootings that cause the most outrage — and which are most easily cleared up.

Inner-city shooting cases rarely get solved (emphases in the original):

The clearance rate (that is, the odds of getting arrested if you shoot someone) in Chicago is 9%.  In Atlanta, 12%.  In almost every other major city (Baltimore anyone?), it’s roughly the same.  Yeah, if you go insane and start shooting people in a WallyWorld en-masse you’re either going to jail and will get the needle or will just get shot where you stand.

But if you shoot people one at a time you have a ten percent chance of getting caught; 9 out of 10 times you get away with it.  I know people who were close with someone who got shot, the dead person was not a gang member or otherwise engaged in activity that typically gets you shot (he was an ordinary businessmanand the perpetrator has not been identified or arrested a full year later.

That is not uncommon.  In fact it’s not only common it’s a 90% probability if you get plugged in a major city right here, right now.

He says that is why law-abiding Americans need guns:

If that doesn’t force your pea-sized brain awake long enough to realize that the cops are worthless in solving crimes and their best, highest and only calling is to zip your ass into a black bag and haul it away after you get killed then you are too stupid to deserve to be able to reproduce.  There is only one way to stop that sort of crap and that is for you to stop it, personally, if someone intends to whack you or someone you love.  To do that, especially if you’re not a 20 year old body-builder male, you’re going to need the only equalizing force ever invented by mankind and you better know how to use it too.

It’s called a gun.

Yet, as he points out, the small town or suburban mass shootings generate all the leftist outrage.

Of course, their cry is always for gun control. However, Denninger explains why gun control will not work:

… cut the crap on the “gun control” nonsense.  Just over the border, a few miles away, there are more guns than you can shake a stick at — everyone of them unregistered in America because they’re in Mexico.  Juarez is an insanely violent area, and it’s right there.  You want a gun and can’t pass a background check here, get it there.  93% of crimes go unreported in Juarez.  Without a real wall and enforceable border, what’s to stop you from bringing that gun here?  Hell, the Mexican you buy it from might have gotten it courtesy of Eric Holder, our former AG, who has never been held to account for running many guns into Mexico!

Every Demonscat on the planet has jumped on this demanding “more gun control” without even waiting for the bodies to reach room temperature.  Yeah, right.  You can blow me, lefties.  Your fantasy-land nonsense would prevent nothing.  Go look in Mexico; there is exactly one legal gun store in the entire country and it takes months to get paperwork processed to buy one.  Possession of even one firearm or one round of ammunition is good for a five year prison sentence there.

That does exactly zippo to prevent all those who want to murder from acquiring and using them in Juarez.

Since it is proved that just a few miles south the most-restrictive gun laws imaginable do exactly nothing to prevent hundreds of murders every year in that city alone no, I will not consent to any further infringement of the 2nd Amendment. 

Ben Carson’s visit to Baltimore

Dr Ben Carson, who heads HUD, visited Baltimore last week.

Karl Denninger wrote another great piece, ‘How Come Nobody Is Quoting Carson?’

Although the highly-experienced brain surgeon did not implore the city’s underprivileged youths to stop shooting each other, he did offer — unreported — advice on how to get ahead in life:

What did he say as the solution to poverty (which NPR did not report, as you can see)?

1. Finish High School.

2. Get married.

3. Don’t have children until you have accomplished #2.

Now does this somehow deal with the Federal Government impoverishing people by running fiscal deficits?  No.  But at a micro level — that is, individual people, not macro policy — he’s right.

Absolutely, but because this is a middle class way of living, this will get ignored.

That said, who would know best about those points? Ben Carson himself. The good doctor was raised by a single mother. He almost went to the dark side as a youth, then found religion and did his best to not only graduate from high school but also to go on to university and medical school — to become a brain surgeon, no less.

Denninger expands on the good doctor’s points:

… for the ordinary, average person they mean a lot.  And by the way, remember this rule that I drilled into my daughter:

“1 + 1 can be more than 2.  That’s the only real magic you will ever find in the world, but it is real, provided you choose wisely.  However, 1 – 1 is always 0 and can, if you choose poorly, be worse than that; it can be negative.”

One of the problems with this advice in today’s world is that there are an awful lot of zeros or worse walking around — of both sexes.  And by the way, almost without exception every one of those Hollywood “stars” or pro sports players in any league, ever, are all less than zeros in every respect except for being rich and if you emulate them without being rich first you will be destroyed.

He and Dr Carson are 110% correct.

Please share this advice with your children, if you haven’t already.

Cloud computing and Capital One

This year, a former Amazon.com employee hacked into Capital One Financial Corp. customer data that Amazon.com was storing on its cloud services.

On July 29, Bloomberg reported:

While the complaint doesn’t identify the cloud provider that stored the allegedly stolen data, the charging papers mention information stored in S3, a reference to Simple Storage Service, Amazon Web Services’ popular data storage software.

An AWS spokesman confirmed that the company’s cloud had stored the Capital One data that was stolen, and said it wasn’t accessed through a breach or vulnerability in AWS systems. Prosecutors alleged that the access to the bank data came through a misconfigured firewall protecting one of its applications.

Paige A. Thompson was arrested Monday and appeared in federal court in Seattle. The data theft occurred some time between March 12 and July 17, U.S. prosecutors in Seattle said.

Karl Denninger posted a hard-hitting article about this. Don’t miss ‘I TOLD YOU SO: “CLOUD” IS INSECURE’.

You bet it is. Yet, we have friends who store their personal — including financial — data on the cloud! No!

Denninger explains:

There you have it.  The bank had data that was highly confidential and let another company with thousands of people who could access it, none of whom the bank knew by name or could vet, have said data by intentionally putting it on that other firm’s computer systems in the name of “cloud computing.”

One of those people did allegedly access and steal it.  It doesn’t matter how they did so; the fact that the data was there provided the “honeypot” and a large base of people who knew it was there instead of said data being on your own corporate infrastructure behind access controls that you, and only you, are responsible for.

Gee, how dumb are you?

How many times have I pointed this out?  Dozens

Once you use a “cloud provider” it’s not your data anymore despite your claims otherwise.  The data is, in fact, accessible by anyone who has administrative access at the cloud company and they don’t work for you nor can you vet them.  Further, those people working there now know the data is there which gives them a big fat “target list” to take a crack at.  Those people with that knowledge and at least some expertise in getting in, including perhaps even direct credentialed access through ordinary administrative procedures number in the thousands at large firms like Amazon or Microsoft if not tens of thousands and you not only can you as the “customer” not vet them you have no idea who the hell they are.  Some of them probably aren’t even American citizens! H1b (not this time, but you can bet in general) for the win!

[[Update 7/30 6:50 AM: It appears that the person who did the “hacking” not only was employed by Spamazon the individual claims to be here in the US illegally.  So how’d they get the job?  Spamazon, for its part, disclaims responsibility and says “it wasn’t hacked.”  Disclaim whatever you want Amazon; the fact is the data was on your box and was stolen by what appears to be an ex Amazon employee.  Such a wonderful job of vetting you do eh, never mind all the SJW/insanity connections allegedly present with this individual too.]]

Congratulations Capital Zero, 100 million records stolen because you were ****ing stupid and put saving a buck in front of data security.  This should be treated by banking regulators as criminal negligence; ditto for any other firm that has its data stolen after employing such a “cloud” environment where there was any expectation of privacy or protection of said data.

This is why you don’t use cloud computing for anything you give a crap about and has to be kept secure …

Yes, yes and yes!

You can read more about the hacker and see photos at the Daily Mail. Definitely worth viewing.

If you think you cannot provide enough resilience on your home computer, think again. This is what one of Denninger’s readers says (emphases mine):

I can buy multi-terabyte drives for a couple of hundred bucks (obviously price varies as a function of quality, intended use, etc.) just about anywhere. For a thousand bucks I can set up a pretty-near foolproof, multi-terabyte, automated RAID system with access times for any computer on my own network that have gotta be less than up- and downloading from the cloud.

Where exactly is the alleged cost savings for anyone to store any data “in the cloud”?

Spot on. If you cannot build it yourself, hire an expert.

———————-

And thus concludes my news in brief.

You couldn’t make it up.

N.B.: Language alert and red pills below. Controversial. Not for the faint of heart.

On Wednesday, January 10, 2018, in discussing immigration, President Donald Trump allegedly made a remark about immigration from ‘sh*thole countries’, according to Senator Dick Durbin (D-Illinois).

The conversation, including several others, took place behind closed doors in the Oval Office.

Senator David Perdue (R-Georgia) attended the meeting and said that only Dick Durbin heard it. Perdue discussed the issue with ABC’s George Stephanopolous:

As usual, media and politicians have been harping on this ever since.

Never-Trumper Mia Love (R-Utah) issued a statement:

Allegedly, Trump asked why there couldn’t be more immigration to the United States from countries like Norway. Why did he mention that nation in particular? Because he had welcomed the Norwegian prime minister to the White House that day:

This is Trump’s explanation:

Media reports said that Haiti, in particular, was singled out:

Trump retweeted an important fact revealing Dick Durbin’s hypocrisy:

Durbin also made a false claim about a Republican during the Obama years:

On Friday, January 12, Trump honoured Martin Luther King Jr Day:

Housing and Urban Development secretary — the retired brain surgeon from the slums of Detroit — Dr Ben Carson is on the left and Isaac Newton Farris Jr, a nephew of Martin Luther King Jr, is on his right. Vice President Mike Pence is behind them. Several other people attended this event, during which:

President Donald J. Trump signed H.R. 267 into law on January 8. Named the “Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park Act,” the law redesignates a National Historic Site in Georgia—the state where King was born—as the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park.

This was Trump’s message to the nation on Monday, in which he reviewed Martin Luther King Jr’s beliefs and ideals and how important they were to the Civil Rights movement — and to Americans today:

On Saturday, Martin Luther King Jr’s niece, Alveda King, gave an interview to Fox & Friends, explaining what Trump meant by his remark just days before:

“Racism is just a word that is being bandied about and thrown… at the president unjustly,” she said. “President Trump is not a racist.”

King said that, in his reported remarks, Trump was not disparaging Africans or Haitians but instead calling attention to the fact many of their governments are inadequate and corrupt.

“Some of their own leaders have taken advantage of them,” she said.

She also criticized American Urban Radio Networks correspondent April Ryan, who repeatedly shouted “are you a racist” at the president during the King Birthplace park signing ceremony.

Years ago, minorities viewed Trump as their ally:

Here’s the irony about the mention of Haiti:

Donald Trump may or may not have called Haiti a “s***hole” – everyone freaks out. UN peacekeepers actively ran a child sex ring in Haiti – nobody bats an eye.

If we’re going to talk about Haiti, who exploited it more than Billary Clinton via their (in)famous foundation?

Yet, Hillary got pious when reacting to Trump …

… which elicited many critical reactions, including this one …

… and this one:

If we’re going to talk about other countries of this nature, look at what ended up in 2016’s Podesta WikiLeaks. This is from Gabe Podesta, John’s son:

The media went nuts and said ‘sh*thole’ more times than you can shake a stick. CNN even wrote the word on a whiteboard.

On a Trump-supporting news site, Gateway Pundit, lead writer Jim Hoft applauded (bold in the original):

That’s our president.

And THAT’S why we love him!

President Trump responded today to the “Gang of Six” immigration plan.
Could not have said it better myself.

Dilbert’s Scott Adams translated the words into normal American parlance:

Poor countries with bad schools that have favored immigration status.

Adams also posited that leakers of sh*thole comments are the real race baiters:

Although, not surprisingly, many Americans were shocked by this fake news, others started to point out the fallacy in Democrats’ — including media’s — thinking. One Twitter user calls it The Sh*thole Conundrum:

Those countries aren’t sh*tholes.

Illegal aliens can’t go home because their country is a sh*thole.

Regardless of language used, The_Donald‘s readers agreed with Trump, including this person:

people trying to act like this is offensive, but its honestly the truth and I don’t even like trump that much

That same thread had the following comment:

MASH : Make America a Sh*t Hole, the Dem 2018 campaign slogan. Not to be confused with get-out-the-vote arm, SHARD, Sh*t Holes Are Reliably Democrat.

It seems that person was not the only one thinking that, because the online world started filling up with examples of Democrat-run cities:

I was amazed to find the photo on the right shows Houston.

A US Navy veteran from St Louis, Missouri, rightly took issue with the state of Durbin’s nearby Illinois constituency, which he has been serving since 1983, first as congressman and now senator. Watch:

Here are four more incredible films about Dick Durbin’s East St Louis. For those unaware, the empty lots in the residential parts of town are where houses were razed. Watch:

Dick Durbin should be ashamed of himself. But, that’s impossible. He’s a Democrat.

One week after Hurricane Harvey, and President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania were finally able to visit Houston and other affected cities nearby.

Many Americans online have been saying they have never seen a president and first lady so involved in helping their fellow citizens in person. Accompanying the Trumps were Housing and Urban Development Secretary Dr Ben Carson and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

Last week, Trump pledged $1m of his own money to the relief effort.

He has sent a letter to Congress requesting $7.85 bn be allocated to relief. Congress will vote on the funding this week.

Although flood water is receding in places, tens of thousands of Texans are in grave difficulty.

As of Thursday, August 31, 2017, more than 10,000 people were staying in relief centres in Houston.

The Texas Tribune interviewed Houstonians seeking shelter at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Between 6,500 and 8,000 people are staying there indefinitely. Ten thousand had been there at the height of the storm. One enterprising woman has found a job at the convention centre as a cleaner. Others are contemplating starting from scratch:

Haley Gray and her family arrived at the Houston convention center early this week after their Channelview home flooded.

“It was almost like a river,” she said.

She and her sister’s seven children were rescued by a helicopter and have been at the shelter for four days. On Thursday, they were relocating to a hotel. From there, they’ll begin to figure out what to do next. Gray is on disability and helps take care of her sister’s kids, ages 1 to 11. The family’s car was likely totaled in the flood. Most of their belongings were ruined. Like many, they must now chart a new life with few resources and a cloud of uncertainty hanging over their heads.

“I don’t think we’re going to be able to go back because it’s pretty bad,” she said as her nieces and nephews crowded around her.

On Saturday, September 2, the city’s mayor, Sylvester Turner, ordered a mandatory evacuation of 300 people who are still in their homes in flooded areas in West Houston. Some of the homes in this area were flooded when water from the Addicks and Barker-Cypress reservoirs had to be released last week.

The convention centre is one of seven large shelters run jointly by the city, Harris County and the Red Cross. Around 20 other smaller shelters are also open, however, officials would like to have residents transfer to NRG Stadium, southwest of downtown. The Trumps visited the stadium on Saturday.

Mayor Turner met with President Trump on Saturday and was one of his hosts in Houston along with Governor Greg Abbott. Turner called his meeting with Trump ‘productive’:

At NRG Stadium, the Trumps toured the facility and helped serve a hot dog and potato chip lunch. They also spent time talking with dozens of people, including children. Pictures and videos coming tomorrow.

After leaving Houston, the Trumps, Carson and DeVos went to Pearland (pron. ‘Pear-land’), where they helped distribute supplies to people driving up to the First Church of Pearland. Many people expressed their thanks to Trump, who spent time talking with some of the drivers before loading their vehicles.

The group left Texas to fly to Louisiana, where they spent time in Lake Charles, hosted by Governor John Bel Edwards and his wife.

Trump took a political risk with this trip. Last week, Turner, a Democrat, made no acknowledgement of Trump’s $1m donation and his Twitter feed expressed pessimism about federal money. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson-Lee (D-Houston) was among those at the airport to see Trump off. Neither is a Trump ally, even after his visit. And, there seems to be some negativity from the two Democrats towards the Republican governor, Abbott. Another Republican there was Trump’s primary rival from 2016, Senator Ted Cruz. Louisiana’s governor, John Bel Edwards, is a Democrat, but, fortunately, he has no complaints about Trump’s handling of Harvey efforts so far.

Elsewhere outside of Houston, some residents are without power. The Daily Caller reported:

Beaumont, a city of roughly 120,000 residents, is still without clean water or power, according to a CNN report. And the Associated Press reported Saturday that seven toxic waste sites in and around Houston have flooded.

The Guardian reported:

The scale of the disaster loomed clearer on Friday as rescuers worked their way through the 300-mile swath of south-east Texas drenched by Harvey. Some communities remained submerged; others lacked water and power. Texas officials estimate more than 185,000 homes were damaged and 9,000 destroyed. The Red Cross said 42,000 people were in shelters. At least 45 people have died.

Helping state and federal teams are groups of volunteers, including the Texas Navy and the Cajun Navy. Cajun Relief has a good article explaining how they know where to go:

The Texas Navy and Cajun Navy are fully controlled and dispatched by this organic army of tech and creative volunteers sitting behind their computers and working around the clock by organizing into shifts. If you’ve ever listened in on their Zello channel at 2am, you’ve heard one of the shifts dispatching boaters.

Here is how the whole system works.

First you need to have person to rescue. These requests come to the volunteers from their Zello app channel, called the Texas Navy. They also come by the hundreds as Inbox request sent to them from victims needing rescue through the Texas Navy Facebook page. Each request is entered into a database by one of the support team members and then vetted by another. Each of these team members are sitting in their own homes, which can be states and even countries apart. Once the need has been confirmed the dispatch team, some of them sitting in coffee shops possibly near you, advise boaters where to perform rescues.

Along with directing the boaters to perform a rescue, the citizen team also tracks where the water will be moving so they can pre-stage the boaters ahead of time. The boaters may get the glory but without the enormous efforts of citizens sitting behind their computers and using social media and technology to direct them many more thousands of lives would have been lost because boaters wouldn’t know where to go.

These dispatchers, researchers, messengers, managers and coordinators have never met, but by using technology and learning to work together they’ve had an enormous impact by saving flood victims lives.

You can see photos of the dispatchers following the article. What a diverse group of people who live all over the United States, from screenwriters to school bus drivers to small business owners.

The Texas Baptist Men and their female volunteers are busy, too. They have a mobile shower facility, which is a great idea. There are separate cubicles for men and women. The volunteers also supply fresh towels — and, afterwards, copies of the Bible:

So many unsung heroes are working around the clock, such as the owner of the Trump Truck:

So many people are getting the immediate help they need to survive. There is very little crime right now, largely because Texans won’t hesitate to shoot when necessary and, in Houston, because of Turner’s midnight curfew for everyone. It is still in effect.

Trump could well be right when he says that a lot will get done in the next six months thanks to such a positive spirit in the midst of disaster.

Videos and tweets coming tomorrow.

Last week, supporters of President Donald Trump had to endure much negativity.

There were the melées in Charlottesville and Boston, the media and others on the Left denouncing him, continued calls for his removal from office and so on.

Then there are the conversations that we have with people — friends and acquaintances. For my circle, Trump isn’t sophisticated enough. One Englishman actually said to me just a few days ago:

Trump isn’t very bright. He appeals only to the unsophisticated — like people in Boise, Idaho.

He was refuted pretty quickly on that one, let me tell you.

Anyway, with all of this rubbish going on, Trump’s (previously) scheduled rally in Phoenix, Arizona on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 came at the perfect time.

The videos

Those interested can view everything — from supporters’ interviews to the guest speakers to Trump’s speech — below. Thank you, RSBN:

The following video from Fox 10 in Phoenix is of Trump’s one hour and seventeen minute speech:

If you have never seen a Trump rally, it’s worth watching. They’re all good — and all on YouTube.

Arizona Republicans spoke as did Alveda King, Martin Luther King’s niece who is very much pro-life.

The Rev Franklin Graham — Billy’s son — opened proceedings with a prayer. (Alveda King is on the right in black and purple.) This really is an amazing prayer on so many levels. RSBN also pans the crowd so you can see how many thousands are there:

Speaking of crowds, someone did a great time lapse video of the queue of people waiting to get in to the Phoenix Convention Center. It was a hot day, with temps over 100° F (40°+ C). People get to Trump’s evening rallies early in the morning and are outdoors all day long:

Trump tweeted that there were 15,000.

They were probably in line before Trump left Washington DC. Upon arrival in Arizona, Trump visited the US Border Protection and ICE teams in Yuma:

They told him about their daily work and the dangers they face. Trump discussed the visit in his speech.

Speech highlights

Although the teleprompter was up and running, Trump diverged from it with his trusty Sharpie-written notes and quotes. Trump is nearly always better without a teleprompter.

Trump began by thanking his supporters in Arizona and reminding them that he did his first ever rally there, during the Republican candidate debate season. He also thanked the speakers who preceded him.

He spent several minutes recapping his three statements about Charlottesville, which I covered here last week. N.B.: Although Trump did not say it, Charlottesville was a paid-for, false flag event on both sides.

Trump was amazed that the media did not mention he has ‘a home there’. It is where Trump Winery is located.

He said that the media were to blame for stirring up division in America. He said they reported only parts of stories, particularly those related to him. They take selective quotes from his statements. He wondered if the media even liked America because they seem to be so against the interests of the American people.

He did give credit to Fox News, namely Fox and Friends (morning show) and Sean Hannity (late night show). He watches both:

He also said he did not like it when the media smeared his supporters:

He also said that there was a lot of news they never cover, such as America’s failing education system and gang violence:

Between 32 and 35 minutes in, CNN and MSNBC shut off their cameras. Trump could see this, because their red camera lights went on. He mentioned it.

This is what happened at MSNBC. Notice the test pattern. (Surely, being a ‘Trash Man’ is a good thing. The trash man — dustman in the UK — removes rubbish.) Rachel Maddow wasn’t sure yet what was going on:

Trump talked about his 1m+ new jobs which would help to unify the nation and end the current division. He said that he wanted prosperity for all:

Trump went on to review his many achievements during the first seven months of his presidency, which I’ve also written about.

Although his infrastructure project has started, some CEOs from his advisory panel resigned after Charlottesville, because they did not think his statements went far enough. He disbanded the group:

He criticised Congress (and the Senate) for failing to pass legislation to repeal Obamacare. He said he had not given up and also pledged the largest tax reform ‘in 30 years’:

The tweets below are reactions from the elitist neo-con never-Trumper Bill Kristol (Trump complimented General Kelly, moved from Homeland Security to Chief of Staff) and conservative pundit, the pro-Trump Laura Ingraham:

Trump rightly had a go at local governments and universities bowing to pressure from Antifa to have Confederate and other statues of past American leaders removed. He told them not to touch those of George Washington. Removal takes place in the middle of the night, incidentally:

Around this time:

Trump spoke about renegotiating NAFTA. The first round of talks took place at the end of last week and ran through the weekend:

He signalled that he was sick and tired of the advice from outsiders:

He had a few closing soundbites, including:

Trump then concluded his speech:

Reactions

As ever, Trump pleased his supporters.

A Canadian had a righteous blast at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Thank you:

CNN responded with a programme about impeaching Trump featuring their usual leftist experts, Deep Staters and Democrats.

A New York City radio show host measured Trump’s speech by noting the Left’s hysteria. Responses mentioned the CNN feature about impeachment:

There was also this scandalous CNN commentary on black Trump supporters, including the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, retired brain surgeon Dr Ben Carson:

Terrible. Now that is racist, even if Mr Boykin is himself black. That‘s CNN, folks.

Indeed it is.

NBC’s White House reporter tweeted:

People at home were blown away:

You bet.

In closing, here’s the verdict of Trump’s longtime supporter, Pastor Mark Burns:

Amen, Pastor Burns. MAGA!

In opening remarks to his staff on March 6, 2017, the Secretary for Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Dr Ben Carson, commented on slaves, saying they were ‘immigrants’.

The media and other ‘experts’ verbally ganged up on the retired brain surgeon, best known for his pioneering surgery on conjoined twins. Those outside the United States will be interested to know that Carson is black and grew up in Detroit.

Yet, Obama made the same comment in 2015, and no one said a word. Why is it that Carson was criticised but Obama was not?

The Daily Caller had an article on the media storm:

“That’s what America is about, a land of dreams and opportunity,” Carson said during a speech at HUD’s offices.

“There were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships, worked even longer, even harder for less. But they too had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great-granddaughters, might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land.”

Liberal pundits blasted Carson’s remarks, saying that it is insensitive to use the term “immigrant” to describe people taken to a new country against their will.

This is what Obama said two years ago at a naturalisation ceremony:

“Certainly, it wasn’t easy for those of African heritage who had not come here voluntarily and yet in their own way were immigrants themselves,” Obama said.

“There was discrimination and hardship and poverty. But, like you, they no doubt found inspiration in all those who had come before them. And they were able to muster faith that, here in America, they might build a better life and give their children something more.”

That was not the only time. He spoke at an earlier naturalisation ceremony in 2012:

“We say it so often, we sometimes forget what it means — we are a nation of immigrants.  Unless you are one of the first Americans, a Native American, we are all descended from folks who came from someplace else — whether they arrived on the Mayflower or on a slave ship, whether they came through Ellis Island or crossed the Rio Grande,” Obama said at the ceremony.

The Daily Caller looked for media mentions of the 2012 and 2015 speeches. There were none.

Everyone harping on about Carson is simply angry that he is a black Republican in the Trump administration. ‘How dare he?’ they think.

Of course, Carson had to issue a statement. He said this (emphases mine below):

“I think people need to actually look up the world ‘immigrant,’” he said in an interview with Armstrong Williams. “Whether you’re voluntary or involuntary, if you come from outside to the inside, you’re an immigrant. Slaves came here as involuntary immigrants.”

Obama’s family and slavery

It is highly possible that both sides of Obama’s family owned and sold slaves in the past.

In 2009, Cynthia Yockey, a former Democrat turned conservative, wrote ‘Obama’s Kenyan ancestors sold slaves’, which is a remarkably well researched article not just on Obama’s ancestors but also on the nature of the slave trade in general. It continues today and is a Muslim practice in certain countries. This is a good article to share with older children and summarise for younger members of the family.

Yockey wrote about the topic because, on July 12, 2009, Obama visited Ghana. She said that he had to:

hope no one in the state-run media would think to wonder why he didn’t choose Kenya in East Africa, the land of his father and his father’s tribe, the Luo, which also was a major slave-trading center.

She added:

One reason may be that New World blacks would be descended from West Africans. However, I am suspicious that another reason is that on both his mother’s AND his father’s side of the family, Obama is descended from people who owned and/or sold black African slaves. How ironic that Obama received almost universal support from blacks who are here because their ancestors were grabbed up and sold into slavery by other black Africans, including Obama’s father’s tribe.

Yockey notes that, in 2007, the Baltimore Sun fully researched the slavery angle involving Obama’s white side of the family.

Having read the Baltimore Sun article, I want to point out to you this interesting bit near the end:

Author and essayist Debra J. Dickerson wrote in a January salon.com article that she had previously refrained from opining about the senator because “I didn’t have the heart (or the stomach) to point out the obvious: Obama isn’t black.”

” ‘Black,’ in our political and social reality, means those descended from West African slaves,” Dickerson said.

Back now to Cynthia Yockey’s research. She saw that there was an article on About.com — no longer there in 2017 — which was reproduced elsewhere, called ‘Obama’s African Forebears Were Slave Traders’. It describes the thriving Muslim slave trade in Africa in the 18th century:

Muslims encouraged warring tribes, Obama Jr’s Luo ancestors included, to capture “prisoners of war” and sell them into slavery.

Kenya tribe leaders, also exported slaves and ivory that had been exchanged by Africans from the interior for salt, cloth, beads, and metal goods. The slaves were then marched to the coast and shipped to Muslim Zanzibar (an island South of Kenya), to be traded again.

The British ended the practice by law in 1847.

However, Yockey reproduced other articles saying that African Muslims had traded slaves for centuries before that. Furthermore, European buyers had to go through a Muslim slaver to buy black slaves. They could not operate independently.

Yockey’s research uncovered another important point: Muslim slavers from Kenya looked African but, in fact, were Arab, just like the Luo tribe of Obama’s ancestors.

White indentured and enforced servitude

In the history of the United States, black slaves were not the only people who arrived involuntarily. White Britons did, too.

I don’t know if history books still include indentured servitude in their coverage of Colonial history. If not, they should re-introduce it.

One of my best friends has ancestors who arrived in the US in the 17th century as indentured servants.

Indentured and enforced servitude were one up from slavery. However, sometimes slaves were treated better than indentured servants.

Indentured servitude involved someone in debt or other hardship becoming the temporary property of the person to whom he owed a debt or a better off person. The person who acquired them — the master — worked them for a certain number of years, after which the indentured servant became a free person.

However, it should be noted that there were also cases where men just wanted to leave their homeland for a new future in the colonies. They voluntarily sought and signed such agreements.

USHistory.com has an excellent article on indentured servitude, which came at a time of severe unemployment in England and a boom in the new colony of Virginia. These bonded servants worked in the tobacco fields or as house servants. A summary and excerpts follow.

Most indentured servants were men, however, women also signed these agreements. The master paid for their passage to the American colonies and provided them with food, clothing and shelter during the years of their servitude:

Perhaps as many as 300,000 workers migrated under the terms of these agreements. Most were males, generally in their late teens and early twenties, but thousands of women also entered into these agreements and often worked off their debts as domestic servants.

There was also enforced servitude, involving miscreants:

Vagrants, war prisoners, and minor criminals were shipped to America by English authorities, then sold into bondage.

The masters’ treatment varied, just as it did with slavery:

In some areas, slaves were treated more humanely because they were regarded as lifetime investments, while the servant would be gone in a few years.

There were also terms and conditions the servant had to abide by:

The length of servitude could legally be lengthened in cases of bad behavior, especially for those workers who ran away or became pregnant

Masters retained their right to prohibit their servants from marrying and had the authority to sell them to other masters at any time.

The only upside to indentured or enforced servitude was access to the courts and the possibility of owning property, provided one hadn’t died from overwork.

Upon being given their freedom:

many workers were provided with their “freedom dues” — often consisting of new clothes, farm tools and seed; on rare occasions the worker would receive a small plot of land.

Some former servants could not find jobs after being given their freedom. Men in such a position often ventured westward, which, in the 17th century, would have been as far as Kentucky or Tennessee. (The big move to the West did not begin until the 19th century.)

Servitude, slavery and the law

Each colony — later, state — had their own laws governing indentured or enforced servitude and slavery.

The Law Library of Congress has a detailed and interesting article on how colonial and state law applied to indentured servants and to slaves. The article focusses mainly on Virginia but provides a useful overview. Excerpts and a summary follow.

Both practices ended on January 31, 1865 with the Emancipation Proclamation, however:

many laws and judicial precedents that had been established before that date would not be changed until the mid- or late-twentieth century.

Before that happened, most of the laws around these two groups of people involved women, illegitimate children and racial intermingling.

In 1662, Virginia:

passed two laws that pertained solely to women who were slaves or indentured servants and to their illegitimate children. Women servants who produced children by their masters could be punished by having to do two years of servitude with the churchwardens after the expiration of the term with their masters. The law reads, “that each woman servant gott with child by her master shall after her time by indenture or custome is expired be by the churchwardens of the parish where she lived when she was brought to bed of such bastard, sold for two years. . . .”37

The second law, which concerned the birthright of children born of “Negro” or mulatto women, would have a profound effect on the continuance of slavery, especially after the slave trade was abolished—and on the future descendants of these women. Great Britain had a very structured primogeniture system, under which children always claimed lineage through the father, even those born without the legitimacy of marriage. Virginia was one of the first colonies to legislate a change:

Act XII

Negro womens children to serve according to the condition of the mother.

WHEREAS some doubts have arrisen whether children got by any Englishman upon a Negro woman should be slave or free, Be it therefore enacted and declared by this present grand assembly, that all children borne in this country shalbe held bond or free only according to the condition of the mother, And that if any christian shall committ ffornication with a Negro man or woman, hee or shee soe offending shall pay double the ffines imposed by the former act.38

Because of this law, slave masters were keen to procreate with young female slaves, so they would have a steady supply of slaves to come:

There are a number of court cases concerning slave women who either killed their masters who forced them to have sexual relations or killed the children rather than have the children enslaved.39

Racial mixing, including sexual congress, was not unknown in that era. In 1691, Virginia amended their aforementioned 1692 birthright law, under which a child born to a white woman and a black man was free:

This amendment stated that a free white woman who had a bastard child by a Negro or mulatto man had to pay fifteen pounds sterling within one month of the birth. If she could not pay, she would become an indentured servant for five years. Whether or not the fine was paid, however, the child would be bound in service for thirty years.

Conclusion

Both slaves and indentured servants had a miserable life.

And, there was nothing that Ben Carson had to apologise for, especially as Obama had spoken similarly on two occasions during his time in office.

I hope this brief foray into American history, past and present, has helped to enlighten and fill in gaps on what was known as ‘human chattel’ and immigration, regardless of race or origin.

The Riverwalk has appropriate Bible readings for the Emancipation Proclamation — 152 years on — that we would do well to read and remember today.

https://a.thumbs.redditmedia.com/VSxB-oFgeCCNvj31vHSzz1JgIMSuVrhBBse5u37uCp8.pngToday, let’s look at the lighter side of Christmas.

The Trump as Santa image comes from one of his fans at The_Donald.

It has a lot of clever detail. Ted Cruz is the elf on the outside looking in. Below Cruz’s picture are images of Trump’s unofficial campaign mascots, Harambe the Gorilla and Pepe the Frog. Hillary is in the snowball on his desk. On the opposite side is Trump’s favourite beverage, Diet Coke. Slightly to the right of that is the little red Trump Train. One of the balls on the tree has Jeff Sessions’s picture (second from the top), and another Ben Carson’s (bottom). Santa Trump’s list has Rosie O’Donnell‘s and Megyn Kelly‘s names on the Naughty side. Mike Pence and Carrier made the Nice list.

Trump’s latest achievement was getting Boeing’s CEO to back down on the cost of the new Air Force One planes. Lockheed Martin also drew the president elect’s ire over the cost of the F-35 fighter jet project. Their CEO has also agreed to re-examine pricing.

Today, December 22, Trump appointed the first successful female presidential campaign manager Kellyanne Conway as counsellor to the president. The married mother-of-four said on December 20 that she and her family would be moving to Washington DC where she planned to work on behalf of Trump in some capacity.

Now on to posts about the secular nature of Christmas.

Historically, this time of year did not have a religious nature even when the Church took root across Europe. Efforts were made during the Middle Ages with Nativity Plays, but a widespread Christian focus occurred only in the 19th century. This eventually extended to Christmas cards, which were quite bizarre when they first appeared. My posts below explain more:

The Christmas tree — a history (related to Christianity)

Christmas gifts — a history (and a Christian defence thereof)

British attitudes towards Christmas

Bizarre Christmas cards from the 19th century

Louis Prang — father of the American Christmas card

Christmas feasting and revelry (the rehabilitation of Christmas)

Last week, Big Media insisted that Donald Trump was going to be shut off from the black community in Detroit.

Sure, he would do an interview with Bishop Wayne Jackson of Great Faith International Ministries which will air on his Impact Network then attend one of his church services. But the Republican candidate would not be speaking with or addressing people. He would remain silent.

How wrong they were.

On Saturday, September 3 Trump gave a one-on-one interview to Jackson and attended a church service. Jackson announced that Trump had prepared a few words to say and that he was welcome to address the congregation. Jackson had a special podium brought out and Trump spoke.

Trump acknowledged at length the importance of black churches in American life. He talked about the importance of Christianity in America as a whole. He complimented Jackson on his interviewing skills, saying they were superior to that of professional interviewers. He also paid compliments to his wife, Dr Jackson. He spoke of the division in America and how people ‘talk past each other’. He said he wanted to unify America and to bring people together as a nation. He said he was proud to represent the party of Abraham Lincoln and put emphasis on the fact that Lincoln was a Republican. He was pained to see the closed shops and people sitting in doorways in Detroit because they had no jobs. He pledged to bring jobs to the city and get people working again. He also pledged that the schools would improve.

Trump ended with 1 John 4:12:

No one has ever seen God; but if we love one another, God lives in us and his love is made complete in us.

He received a warm reception from the congregation.

Afterwards, Jackson gave him a prayer shawl which he had personally prayed and fasted over. He put it around Trump’s shoulders. He also gave him two Bibles — one for him and one for Melania.

He then spoke of the importance of reading the Bible when things got tough and situations seemed impossible. It was really moving. The congregation were listening intently, many taking pictures with their phones.

Then Reuters — the company filming the event — cut the filming.

The full address — and most of Jackson’s words — are in the following video:

A commenter at The Conservative Treehouse tells us what happened next (emphases mine):

I live in metro Detroit and was watching both a local stream from the church’s site and the networks feed on CNN from Reuters. I saw the networks video get cut live as it happened, where the feed from church was still going. I got to see the rest and it was the most moving part. I knew they were not going to let that happen since it would jump over everything negative they were trying to frame ahead and after the event.

This person continued:

The Pastor was providing a gift of … some sort of pin, maybe a cross? He stated something like when you [are] alone in the darkness… struggling with difficult decisions… you feel the weight of the world upon you, wear these and reflect to God to provide you with the wisdom and serenity to make the right choices. Something [of] that nature.

Behind the sound and the cameras, Reuters personnel were having a kerfuffle. One did not want to cut the feed and said he didn’t care if he were demoted. This video has dialogue, including subtitles, of what they were saying:

I’m shooting, I don’t care what … I’ll take a demotion …

Then, from the supervisor:

Shut this down

Answered with:

What?

Supervisor:

Shut it, yeah

And finally:

Yes, Michael. Do it.

Reuters — the company that changed its polling methods in July so that Trump would look as if he were sinking. It worked for a few weeks. But even Reuters’s polling fix can’t keep him down. The latest Reuters/Ipsos polls from Wednesday, August 31 show that Trump is only down by one and two points.

Reuters are shameful both in their polling and their censorship of a pivotal event.

Afterwards, Trump took a tour of the neighbourhood where Dr Ben Carson grew up and stopped in front of his house. Trump spoke with the lady who owns the house now as well as a few of her neighbours. Trump left, probably to see more of Detroit, and Carson spoke to CNN’s Jeremy Diamond.

The good doctor has infinite patience.

Diamond kept asking if Trump should have said in reference to black Americans at an earlier rally elsewhere in the United States ‘What do you have to lose?’

Carson kept explaining that it wasn’t the way Trump said it that mattered but the message behind that question. That was what people were missing. Including Diamond, but he is too much of a gentleman to say so.

In closing, someone else on The Conservative Treehouse said they were glad they saw those two videos — posted there — because they happened to watch a television newscast which said that Trump’s visit to Detroit had been a flop. There were protesters outside the church and he was made to feel unwelcome.

Well, there were protesters outside the church, but, inside, something very profound and solemn was taking place. His conversation with the people outside of Ben Carson’s home seems to have gone well, too, brief though it was.

Oh, yes. One last thing. Never mind what someone from CNN tweeted about the Trump campaign asking for the feed to be cut. That seems rather doubtful. Damage limitation, anyone?

How many more lies do we have to endure from Big Media?

Yesterday’s post covered Dr Ben Carson’s presidential campaign.

One of the most remembered things about it is that he said that the pyramids were grain silos.

The media and leftists made much of this.

On November 5, 2015 several reports emerged.

The Guardian reported that Carson had said the same in 1998 when he gave a commencement address at Andrews University, which is affiliated with Carson’s sect the Seventh Day Adventists. At that time, he thought aliens had something to do with it. In 2015, he said that Joseph built the pyramids to store grain. The Guardian reprised their report the following day with a video of Carson discussing the pyramids.

On November 10, The Guardian had another article on the subject. Mahmoud Afifi, Egypt’s head of ancient antiquities, said that one inaccurate theory about pyramids says that Atlanteans from a lost continent built them. That is probably what Carson was referring to in 1998. Afifi said he did not know what Carson — ‘that man who’s not an archaeologist’ — meant by claiming they were grain silos.

The JTA (Jewish Telegraphic Agency) rightly noted (emphases mine):

It was not clear from his statements whether he thought all or just some of the pyramids were built for this reason and during this period. The story of Joseph storing grain in preparation for an Egyptian famine appears in the Book of Genesis, in the Miketz Torah portion, which will be read in synagogues around the world on Dec. 12. The text makes no mention of the grain being stored in pyramids.

When Carson suspended his campaign the first weekend in March 2016, the Daily Mail reminded us about the grain silos:

Losing ground thanks to some sluggish debate performances, pronouncing Hamas like ‘hummus,’ the chickpea-based spread, when talking foreign policy and suggesting the pyramids in Egypt were built to store grain, Carson’s 2015 holiday season consisted of a big staff shake-up.

However … I do recall hearing this when I was a child from my Protestant friends.

Admittedly, they were more fundamentalist, but they said the Bible clearly stated this and, therefore, one had to believe it or be accused of doubting Scripture which meant doubting God. It was all explained quite clearly to me by my fellow 10-year-old chums.

They were referring to Genesis 41. Joseph, through divine inspiration, prophesied that God planned a seven-year famine. Therefore:

34 Let Pharaoh proceed to appoint overseers over the land and take one-fifth of the produce of the land[b] of Egypt during the seven plentiful years. 35 And let them gather all the food of these good years that are coming and store up grain under the authority of Pharaoh for food in the cities, and let them keep it. 36 That food shall be a reserve for the land against the seven years of famine that are to occur in the land of Egypt, so that the land may not perish through the famine.”

Pharaoh was impressed by Joseph’s divinely given prophecy and put him in charge of the grain conservation project:

45 And Pharaoh called Joseph’s name Zaphenath-paneah. And he gave him in marriage Asenath, the daughter of Potiphera priest of On. So Joseph went out over the land of Egypt.

47 During the seven plentiful years the earth produced abundantly, 48 and he gathered up all the food of these seven years, which occurred in the land of Egypt, and put the food in the cities. He put in every city the food from the fields around it. 49 And Joseph stored up grain in great abundance, like the sand of the sea, until he ceased to measure it, for it could not be measured.

56 So when the famine had spread over all the land, Joseph opened all the storehouses[h] and sold to the Egyptians, for the famine was severe in the land of Egypt. 57 Moreover, all the earth came to Egypt to Joseph to buy grain, because the famine was severe over all the earth.

Note that, as the JTA article states, Scripture makes no mention of pyramids, located outside of cities. In fact, Genesis tells us that the food was put in the cities. More on that later in the post.

From the Genesis accounts came an ancient theory that Joseph was Imhotep. I’ll go into that at the end of the post, too.

First, CPS.org describes what is carved on the Step Pyramid of Sakkara, naming Pharaoh Djoser and the mighty, highly revered:

… Imhotep, Chancelor of the King of Lower Egypt, Chief under the King, Administrator of the Great Palace, Hereditary Lord, High Priest of Heliopolis, Imhotep the Builder, the Sculptor, the Maker of Stone Vases.

CPS.org says that the Step Pyramid of Sakkara, near Memphis, was constructed differently to other pyramids, such as Giza. Sakkara has a wall around it and only one entrance. It also has a picture of starving people:

This carving also includes depictions of grain, sacks that are carried up steps and food distribution.

Genesis 50 records Joseph’s death:

22 So Joseph remained in Egypt, he and his father’s house. Joseph lived 110 years.

24 And Joseph said to his brothers, “I am about to die, but God will visit you and bring you up out of this land to the land that he swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.” 25 Then Joseph made the sons of Israel swear, saying, “God will surely visit you, and you shall carry up my bones from here.” 26 So Joseph died, being 110 years old. They embalmed him, and he was put in a coffin in Egypt.

CPS.org has a long explanation of what was found when Sakkara was excavated. Imhotep’s grave was empty but otherwise undisturbed.

Another website purports that Joseph was Imhotep and has several articles about aligning the Bible with Egyptian history in this regard. It’s easier to read than CPS.org and has better illustrations. One entry says (in part):

The first pyramid to be built was the Stepped Pyramid of Djoser (Netjerikhet) which is part of a complex in Saqqara Egypt that appears to be a grain storage and distribution center. The Step Pyramid itself was built on top of a shaft that was originally used as a grain silo but then converted into a tomb for the Pharaoh. The Step Pyramid is really a series of Mastabas, made from solid limestone blocks, stacked up on top of one another. The Step Pyramid was used to bury Netjerikhet’s 3 wives and 11 daughters and Netjerikhet’s sarcophagus was placed on a platform in the shaft beneath the Stepped Pyramid.

The Step Pyramid was designed by Imhotep who may well be the Joseph of the Bible. Joseph and Imhotep have many similarities but have not been thought to be one in the same person because of discrepancies between the estimated dates of their existence.

The site also discusses the Famine Stele, an inscription of hieroglyphs located on Sehel Island in the Nile near Aswan:

The Famine Stele tells the tale of Imhotep interpreting Netjerikhet’s (Djoser’s) dream about seven years of plenty and seven years of famine and how Imhotep saved Egypt from a seven year famine.

It says that Djoser gave the land to the priests indicating that Djoser had the rights over the land. This would further support the notion that Joseph and Imhotep were the same person.

The Bible tells us that Joseph, second in charge of Egypt, acquired all the land of Egypt for the pharaoh, except that of the priests, by the selling of grain during the famine.

Djoser kept the priests on side by giving them an allowance of grain so that they did not have to sell their land.

There is also an image of slaves carrying grain up steps. The caption reads:

Hieroglyphs of Egyptians retrieving grain using an open stairwell.
This was a great improvement on the tunnels of the first grain silo that were poorly ventilated and resulted in workers suffocating.

It is possible — although archaeologists broadly doubt it — that this is what Sakkara was used for. Perhaps Carson could have clarified his comments a bit more.

Another site, Atlas Obscura, discusses the lost history of the pyramids. Their post says the theory of pyramids — not just Sakkara — as grain silos may date all the way back to the late Dark Ages:

In 867 AD, a European monk named Bernard caught a ride on a slave ship out of the southern Italian city of Taranto. He was heading for the Holy Land, on a pilgrimage with two fellow monks. Somewhere along the line, though, they decided to make a detour through Egypt. This was a pretty normal travel itinerary for the time. In fact, in his book, Wonderful Things: A History of Egyptology from Antiquity to 1881, author Jason Thompson writes that even many of the Crusades for the Holy Land ended up sacking Egypt, instead. And that fact might go a long way toward explaining why Bernard and his friends were promptly dumped into a Cairo prison and had to bribe their way back out.

The article goes on to say that Bernard might well have been interested in seeing Joseph’s granaries, hence the detour.

However, the author rightly points out that the Bible never specifically mentioned pyramids. Yet, recent archaeological research has thrown up ‘anomalies’ about the pyramids: different building materials and varying air currents.

As for the Atlantean theory, Atlas Obscura explains that this came about through mythology from the ancient Greeks. This ages-old theory posits that when Atlantis fell, the Atlanteans inhabited the greatest of the world’s civilisations, Egypt being one of them. Believers in this theory ascribe the construction of the pyramids to the Atlanteans. One hopes Dr Carson no longer believes this, because it is unbiblical.

Personally, I have no belief in pyramids as grain silos unless firmer evidence emerges in coming decades.

However, I did want to help make Carson’s case as to why he believes that.

I am more of the mind, as Atlas Obscura explains, that:

If Bernard (and Ben Carson) had taken a closer look at the region, they’d have seen extraordinary clear evidence that the pyramids are not giant grain silos. Near the Pyramids of Giza, archaeologists have uncovered Gebel Qibli, a city that basically functioned as the company town for the workers who built the pyramids. Those workers were paid in grain, collected as taxes on noble landowners, Watrall says—so Gebel Qibli is home to actual ancient Egyptian grain storage buildings. These are circular, mud-brick structures, sealed against bugs with more mud, but not so sealed that fungus could grow in the stagnant air. “I could stand in the middle of one of them, reach my arms out and that would be the diameter,” [Ethan] Watrall [a Michigan State University professor of anthropology] says. “I couldn’t stand up. It’s less than my height and I’m 6’5”.

For now, it appears that the grain silos were small, round structures, not pyramids.

Whether research reveals conclusively that Sakkara really was a grain silo remains to be seen.

ben carsonIt was disappointing that Dr Ben Carson, 64, had to drop out of the Republican (GOP) presidential race at the weekend.

(Photo credit: Blue Nation Review)

Carson’s campaign

In October, despite his being a Seventh Day Adventist (sect), I was hopeful for his campaign. Polls showed that only he had a chance of beating Hillary Clinton: early in December, he was ahead by one point and early in February 2016, she was ahead by just 1.3 points.

However, the endless focus on race in the West, particularly in the United States, makes it difficult for a black to declare himself (or herself) as a conservative. An offended Left — including the MSM — would have to take Carson down.

Before that happened, however, Carson revealed vulnerability in the GOP (Grand Old Party) debates, particularly on foreign policy.

Another thing people remember from his participation in the debates was his statement that the pyramids were grain silos. Before I go into that, however, leftists commenting online seized on it and called him all sorts of names, including ‘stupid’, ‘idiot’ and ‘fool’. They were frothing at the mouth. These comments continued until Carson dropped out of the race.

Early in November, Politico tried to make Carson out to be a liar. Mollie Hemingway, writing for The Federalist, explains the story and subsequent retraction. In short, Politico‘s Kyle Cheney accused Carson of fabricating receiving a West Point scholarship. Cheney had to retract this shortly afterwards.

Hemingway says:

Ben Carson’s campaign did not “admit” that a central point in his story “was fabricated.” Quite the opposite. The central point of the story is falsely described by Cheney/Politico as being that he applied and was accepted at West Point. Carson, in fact, has repeatedly claimed not to have applied. So any claim regarding the absence of West Point records of such an application would not debunk Carson’s point. And, again, Carson’s campaign never “conceded” the story was false at least in part because the story, as characterized by Politico, is not one he told. Further, Cheney is unable to substantiate his claim that Carson told this story. Nowhere in the article does he even explain, with facts, where he came up with the idea that Carson has ever made this claim.

What happened was that, in 1969, as a 17-year-old, Carson had the exceptional opportunity to meet General William Westmoreland, recently retired from service in Vietnam, for dinner. Westmoreland offered him a full scholarship to West Point, but Carson politely declined. Politico said there was no record of Carson’s application to West Point. Again, he never applied.

Politico changed the headline of their story to:

Exclusive: Carson claimed West Point ‘scholarship’ but never applied

Hardly an improvement.

Carson had been in the cadets in high school in Detroit. Furthermore, as one would expect of a future brain surgeon, his academic performance was excellent. It’s no wonder the general asked him to apply to West Point, offering a full scholarship.

By December 19, GOP polls had changed. Fox News reported:

Donald Trump, a candidate even Republicans once considered a side show, increases his lead yet again in the nomination race, according to the latest Fox News national poll. 

The poll also finds Ted Cruz ticking up, Marco Rubio slipping, and Ben Carson dropping.

At that point, he was in fourth place on

9 percent. He was at 18 percent last month and had a high of 23 percent support earlier this fall.

Yet, he still had more approval points than Jeb Bush, who had 3%!

On December 26, Real Clear Politics had a go at Carson about his paid speaking engagements and book tour during his candidacy. This ‘concern’ piece wondered if there was enough separation between his revenue generating interests and his campaign. Carson’s campaign spokesman Doug Watts said:

We segregate as much as feasible.

The Atlantic had similar ‘concerns’.

Most of this would have gone under the radar of Republican voters. However, as with the grain silos, Carson’s book tour became a running theme of online leftists. That also continued until he dropped out at the weekend.

Rafael ‘Ted’ Cruz’s cheating at the Iowa caucus — saying Carson had dropped out of the race — cost the good doctor dearly. Donald Trump still talks about it, and rightly so, because Cruz’s team’s intimidation of Carson voters created a win for the Christian constitutional expert from Texas, pushing Trump into second place — and leaving Carson in fourth with 9% of the vote.

Cruz and his team seized their opportunity when Carson said that he was going home to Florida the weekend before the Iowa caucus for a change of clothes. Cruz’s people said they got the information from CNN.

I feel badly for Carson. He assumed Cruz was a nice guy and that the media would play fair ball. At a press conference held after the Iowa caucus, Carson rightly took issue with both.

However, I wonder why Carson didn’t just say that he was going home to regroup before going to Washington DC for the annual National Prayer Breakfast, after which he would go on to campaign in New Hampshire. Donald Trump is always clear about where he is going next, probably to avoid similar speculation.

So, as much as the Left wanted Carson to fail because, in their eyes, blacks have no business being conservatives, the true kisses of death came from two of his fellow candidates — avowed Christians, let’s remember — and their people. In addition to Cruz’s was Marco Rubio’s team. The Politistick has the full story about a tweet from a Rubio supporter, since deleted, which said that Rubio’s campaign was spreading the narrative that Carson was dropping out of the race.

Whilst there were also internal issues in Carson’s campaign, such as spending, the Iowa rumours dogged him in New Hampshire. His party after the primary there was a damp squib, sadly.

In mid-February, he said he would be open to discussing running with Trump as the Vice Presidential nominee and would stay on through the South Carolina primary to help the billionaire. Having a lot of primary candidates is good; they help split the vote, thereby preventing an immediate overall dominant front-runner.

Super Tuesday — March 1 — was the decider. The next day, Fox News reported that it was ‘game over’ for Cruz, Rubio, Kasich  — and Carson. (Since then Cruz is proving to be Trump’s main rival.)

He suspended his campaign on March 4, which also made the news in France.

How Carson’s campaign came about

The Washington Post (WaPo) report was the only one I saw that actually explained how Carson came to run for president in the first place.

In 2013, he addressed the National Prayer Breakfast where:

he spoke about the dangers of political correctness, put forward the idea of a flat tax and criticized President Obama’s health-care law. What stood out was that he did so right beside a steely-faced Obama.

Brilliant!

The Wall St Journal thought so, too, and they carried an editorial to that effect days later, entitled:

“Ben Carson for President.” By August of that year, there was a “National Draft Ben Carson for President Committee.” Before he launched his presidential bid last May, the group had raised close to $16 million, gotten a half-million signatures encouraging Carson to run and had 30,000 active volunteers across the country, according to organizers.

WaPo‘s article goes on to say that, at age 33, Carson was the youngest major division director in the history of Johns Hopkins Hospital and:

he was the first pediatric neurosurgeon to successfully separate twins conjoined at the head. He wrote a best-selling book, “Gifted Hands,” about his life, which later became a television movie.

He got a lot of flak for his blunt opposition to Obamacare, his comparison of the United States to Nazi Germany and his denunciation of same-sex marriage.

It was hard for him to not speak about morality in uncertain terms and, paradoxically, be more assertive against other GOP candidates, such as Trump. If he knew something to be immoral, he would say so. Yet, he did not want to be seen to go on the attack against a candidate just for a show of strength.

Of politics, WaPo quotes him as saying:

“Many people told me that this business is corrupt, that it’s evil, that it’s how it’ll always be,” Carson said in a phone interview Monday. “But I don’t believe that we have to accept that. We should rail against that, fight against it, and get something that’s decent and inspirational.”

I couldn’t agree more. This is one of the reasons I read a lot about politics. I continue to look for the ‘decent and inspirational’. Hmm. Like digging for gold.

One thing Dr Ben Carson can be proud of in his campaign: he outlasted Jeb!

Tomorrow: Ben Carson and the grain silo theory

Rafael Edward ‘Ted’ Cruz presents himself as a conservative, Constitutionally-minded, Evangelical-friendly presidential candidate.

Indeed, he is a Southern Baptist.

He also won the Iowa Caucus.

Iowa Caucus 2016

Cruz siphoned votes from retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson. Was it CNN’s fault for tweeting that Carson wanted to return home to Florida giving rise to the rumour he was dropping out of the race? Or does fault lie with a prominent Iowa Cruz supporter who tweeted the rumour, causing Cruz’s Iowa workers to spread the word among Carson’s supporters that their man was dropping out, so they should change their votes to Cruz? Carson said he was only returning home for a change of clothes, nothing more.

Magnanimous in victory, Cruz apologised to Carson after the caucus votes had been tallied. Not surprisingly, the Carson camp feels hard done by. And they were. The Hill talked with Carson supporters on February 3:

Carson’s close friend and adviser Armstrong Williams told The Hill in an interview on Wednesday that the Cruz campaign’s tactics were “nasty, brutal and deceitful.”

“We’ve been told all along that Cruz’s operatives play dirty and were capable of this stuff, but Dr. Carson never believed it, he felt like they had a respectable operation,” Williams said. “Now we see firsthand that having integrity just doesn’t matter to them. It’s about honor and character, either you have it or you don’t” …

Carson’s wife, Candy Carson, was at one of the precincts where the person speaking on Cruz’s behalf told voters that Carson was out …

Carson is giving a speech at the National Press Club on Wednesday afternoon to address the matter.

Donald Trump has seized on the controversy to claim that the election was stolen from him.

Karl Rove correctly predicted that the Cruz camp’s manoeuvre would also cost Donald Trump the win in Iowa (emphasis in the original):

Now the gap between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz is 6,239 votes. There are 1,500 precincts. Do the math… If that message cost Carson four votes per precinct to switch to Cruz, then Cruz beats Trump. If he doesn’t switch four, then he loses.

On February 3, Trump wanted the result nullified and a second round of voting, accusing Cruz of voter fraud. He also tweeted that Cruz’s team sent out ‘voter violation’ certificates to ‘thousands of voters’. Trump rightly took the opportunity to get a pithy jibe in about it at the next Republican debate.

Perhaps Cruz honestly didn’t know that this was taking place at the time. Who knows? However, the fact that this unethical move moved the Iowa result to him shows that his team are not above dirty tricks.

This also begs the question of what sort of person Ted Cruz is. It is difficult to imagine a devoted God-fearing Christian allowing this sort of thing to happen, especially towards a fellow candidate who has no political experience and is an underdog. If he was aware of it, biblical morality and Christian ethics dictate that he should have put a stop to it immediately, including issuing an apology before the vote, not after.

Natural born citizenship status

Then there is the question of whether Ted Cruz is a natural born citizen of the United States.

Read any political blog and the reader’s comments on the topic and you’ll find four strongly-held positions on what constitutes a natural born citizen. This has been going on since 2008, when the present incumbent was running for election. In the end, it was Donald Trump, as late as 2011, who finally managed to get Barack Obama to put a copy of his original long-form birth certificate on the White House website.

Obama’s camp drove it into everyone’s head by verbal force and insults that only one parent needed to be a US citizen, in his case, his mother Stanley Ann Dunham. In any event, they added, Obama was born in Hawaii, which is US soil, so there was no problem. Those who held to the prevailing principle — up to then — that both parents had to be American citizens at the time of a child’s birth in order for him or her to be considered a natural born citizen. The last time a controversy like that arose was over Chester Arthur’s father’s citizenship status in the 19th century. That, too, was quickly kicked into the long grass at the time.

Certainly, questions have arisen over presidential candidates since then. Some, like Barry Goldwater (1964) and George Romney (Mitt’s dad, 1968) were grandfathered in as the territories where they were born became part of the southwestern United States after their birth.

More recently, the Senate had a hearing on John McCain’s natural born status in 2008 and decided that he was as his parents were both natural born Americans and that Panama was under US control at the time of his birth.

However, Bobby Jindal and Marco Rubio — also presidential candidates in 2016, although Jindal once again dropped out — are not natural born American citizens. Their parents were not American citizens at the time of the candidates’ births, even though both Jindal and Rubio were born on US soil.

A case could be made that Ted Cruz is not natural born, either, even if his mother is American.

Ted Cruz’s intriguing citizenship situation

This is Ted Cruz’s mother’s birth certificate. Her name was Eleanor Darragh.

This is Ted Cruz’s birth certificate, issued by the Department of Health in Edmonton, Canada. Note that his mother had her name recorded as Eleanor Elizabeth Wilson.

In his book A Time for Truth: Reigniting the Promise of America Cruz explained that his mother married an American, Alan Wilson, in 1956. The couple moved to London in 1960 for Mr Wilson’s work as a mathematician.

McClatchy DC did a lot of admirable investigation and managed to interview Alan Wilson in London. Please read the article and share it with your Cruz-supporting friends.

In his book Cruz claims the couple had a child in 1965 — Michael Wilson — who died of cot death. The trauma of it, he says, caused the marriage to dissolve.

Alan Wilson remembers circumstances very differently. By 1965, they were already divorced: Wilson thinks in 1963 (emphases mine below):

Wilson, floored to learn that he was mentioned in Cruz’s book, said, in a bombshell of his own, that the account is not accurate: He was not the father of the baby.

“We were divorced and she was living on her own,” said Wilson. He said that Eleanor asked him if she could use his last name on the birth certificate. When Michael Wilson later died, he said, “I hadn’t even met the baby.”

Alan Wilson said by chance he and Eleanor Wilson were being treated in the same hospital when she was pregnant when a nurse told him “his wife” was there – startling the Fort Worthian. “I didn’t know she was pregnant. We were definitely divorced.”

Asked what went wrong, he said, “Marriages don’t always work. It wasn’t because of infidelities or anything like that.”

Now, admittedly, Cruz trusted his mother to tell him the truth about baby Michael. She did not relate the story to him until he was an adolescent.

Another intriguing fact is that Wilson was unaware Eleanor used his family name on Ted’s birth certificate:

Told that Eleanor had used his last name on Ted Cruz’s birth certificate, Wilson said, “I see. That’s interesting.” Pressed to say how he felt about it, he said, “I don’t have any feelings about it.” He later wondered, “Why did she do that? Maybe she’s adopting that name for no reason.”

After little Michael’s death, Eleanor returned to the United States. She met Rafael Cruz, a Cuban national, there and the two married in 1969. They then moved to Canada, where Ted was born in 1970. Cruz Sr became Canadian in 1973.

The family moved to Texas in 1974.

Lawrence Sellin, Ph.D., a retired US Army Reserves colonel, says that a Cruz spokeswoman says Eleanor recorded Ted’s birth with American officials in 1986 so he could get a passport for his class trip to England. He also states that this CRBA — Consular Report of Birth Abroad of a Citizen of the United States of America — has not been released as part of Cruz’s candidacy vetting:

no CRBA has been released that would verify that Ted Cruz was registered as a U.S. citizen at birth.

Sellin believes that Cruz did not enter the US from Canada in 1974 with the right paperwork. At age four, that would have been Mr and Mrs Cruz’s responsibility. However, I went to Canada several times from the United States in the 1960s and 1970s and all one needed was a US or Canadian birth certificate at the time.

Then there is the question over Cruz’s citizenship as an adult. It is incredible that a Princeton-educated, Harvard Law School magna cum laude graduate would not have thought about the issue prior to running for the US Senate in 2012. Seriously?

Cruz claims that when he was a child, his mother told him that she would have to make an affirmative act to claim Canadian citizenship for him, so his family assumed that he did not hold Canadian citizenship.[142] In August 2013, after the Dallas Morning News pointed out that Cruz had dual Canadian-American citizenship,[143][144] he applied to formally renounce his Canadian citizenship and ceased being a citizen of Canada on May 14, 2014.[142][145]

In January 2016, suit was brought seeking a judicial determination as to whether Cruz should be disqualified as a presidential candidate on the grounds of not being a natural born US citizen.[146] After Donald Trump repeatedly questioned whether Cruz met the qualifications of being a natural born citizen, Houston attorney Newton B. Schwartz Sr. filed suit in Texas, claiming that “This 229-year question has never been pled, presented to or finally decided by or resolved by the U.S. Supreme Court… Only the U.S. Supreme Court can finally decide, determine judicially and settle this issue now.”[146]

Too right. Americans should be up in arms about this, but most could not care less.

As Sellin says:

The fact that it is still an open question at this stage of the Presidential campaign is a testament either to the galactic ignorance of our political-media elite or their willingness to place political expediency ahead of the Constitution and the law.

Even assuming a CRBA was filed, the weight of the legal evidence indicates that Ted Cruz is a naturalized U.S. citizen because he was born outside of the jurisdiction of the U.S. and obtained U.S. citizenship by an Act of Congress (Article 1 Section 8 of the Constitution). As a naturalized citizen, he is not eligible for the Presidency (Article 2 Section 1 Clause 5 of the Constitution).

It is disturbing to this writer that, Ted Cruz, a man who claims to be a “principled conservative” and a staunch supporter of the Constitution, should be so opaque about his personal history and unwilling to release his records.

The inadvertent omissions

Cruz also failed to disclose full financial reporting in two instances during his 2012 Senate run:

After Time magazine reported on a potential violation of ethics rules by failing to publicly disclose his financial relationship with Caribbean Equity Partners Investment Holdings during the 2012 campaign, Cruz called his failure to disclose these connections an inadvertent omission.[96]

In January 2016, the New York Times reported that Cruz and his wife had taken out low-interest loans from Goldman Sachs (where she worked) and Citibank, and failed to report the nearly $1 million in loans on Federal Election Commission disclosure statements as required by law.[97] Cruz disclosed the loans on his Senate financial disclosure forms in July 2012, but not on the Federal Election Commission form.[98] There is no indication that Cruz’s wife had any role in providing any of the loans, or that the banks did anything wrong.[98] The loans were largely repaid by later campaign fundraising. A spokesperson for Cruz said his failure to report the loans to the FEC was “inadvertent” and said he would be filing supplementary paperwork.[97]

So it appears that it is up to everyone else to vet Ted Cruz and figure out what else is shadowy or has been inadvertently omitted.

Conclusion

This is why it is so important for Christians to exercise discernment about the candidates they vote for.

Many say, ‘Well, politics is worldly and doesn’t concern me.’

Then an ‘Evangelical’ candidate comes along and they rush in to vote for him. As if the ‘Evangelical’ label is truthful just because the media and the candidate say it is.

Don’t be hoodwinked by what a candidate claims to be or how the media are representing him (or her).

Super Tuesday is quickly approaching — and other primaries before then. Use your Spirit-given gift of wisdom to investigate before voting.

And for those who aren’t concerned about natural born citizen status, what about prominent people who are citizens of other countries but have one American parent or were born in the United States?

Before New York-born British citizen London mayor Boris Johnson revoked his American citizenship in 2015, he had ambitions to run for the presidency.

Jordan’s Prince Hamzan bin Al Hussain has an American mother. Should he consider running for the presidency of the United States?

There could be all comers. Indeed, as we know, there already are.

Ultimately, the people decide — at the ballot box.

Vote wisely.

Check your vote at the ballot box before registering it. If your candidate does not show as per your vote, please contact an election official.

Your future, your children’s future and the future of your country depend on it.

© Churchmouse and Churchmouse Campanologist, 2009-2021. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Churchmouse and Churchmouse Campanologist with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN? If you wish to borrow, 1) please use the link from the post, 2) give credit to Churchmouse and Churchmouse Campanologist, 3) copy only selected paragraphs from the post — not all of it.
PLAGIARISERS will be named and shamed.
First case: June 2-3, 2011 — resolved

Creative Commons License
Churchmouse Campanologist by Churchmouse is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at https://churchmousec.wordpress.com/.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,533 other followers

Archive

Calendar of posts

October 2021
S M T W T F S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

http://martinscriblerus.com/

Bloglisting.net - The internets fastest growing blog directory
Powered by WebRing.
This site is a member of WebRing.
To browse visit Here.

Blog Stats

  • 1,660,661 hits