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Yesterday’s post was about American soldiers’ remains from the Korean War.

On Wednesday, August 1, in Hawaii, Vice President Mike Pence presided over the latest return of 55 remains from that war, which never officially ended. For a number of American families, the past six decades have been troubling, as they cannot be sure whether their loved ones’ remains will ever be recovered.

The Singapore Summit between President Trump and Chairman Kim produced this latest return of remains:

This video has the full Honorable Carry Ceremony:

The Vice President was honoured to preside over the ceremony:

The following tweets summarise his tribute:

President Trump tweeted his appreciation:

The vice president and Mrs Pence had special guests accompany them:

Fox News has more:

The vice president said that when Sanfilippo was 4 years old she lost her father in the Korean War during a recon mission, and that when Downes was just 3 years old he lost his father operating radar on a B-26 bomber …

Fox News’ Pete Hegseth, who was traveling with Pence in Air Force Two, recalled the touching stories of the heroes’ now-grown children.

“We picked up probably the two most important passengers on that plane: a man and woman who were 4 and 3 years old — little girl and little boy in the 1950s  — when they sent their fathers, then young men, both pilots, both first lieutenants, both went to fight in the Korean War,” he said on “Fox & Friends.”

“They dedicated their lives for the last 60 years finding out what happened to their fathers, what happened though those patriots, warriors who went to fight for us, for every generation of Americans,” Hegseth continued.

I hope they find peace and closure.

The remains now need to be analysed in order to identify them — a painstaking process that will take weeks, if not months.

Many more remains are still in North Korea, yet to be discovered. I pray that they are discovered soon. This long and painful chapter of history must come to a close — as does the Korean War.

As we can see below, CNN has their priorities right:

Anyone wanting real news has to go hunting for it:

Then there was the false alarm in Hawaii on Saturday, January 13, 2018, warning of a ballistic missile threat — ‘this is not a drill’:

There’s something deeper behind this incident (language alert):

Here is a better image of the boxed text (from 4chan or 8chan), which is from an Air Force Fusion Analyst at Hickham in Hawaii. Particularly concerning are these sentences:

The false alert was not a mistake. We were informed it was to be a drill, but then all information was put out that the threat was real.

I overheard them [Governor’s office] state that this ‘Demonstrated weakness in the Trump admin and a refusal to protect his people.’

We don’t really know what to do or what’s going on. Which is really bothersome because it’s literally my job to process all information going in and out of this place for reports. I don’t know what to do or what’s going to happen to me.

If this was designed to upset people, it worked:

Breitbart’s Nick Nolte responded:

As did Fox News’s Greg Gutfeld:

Something is definitely wrong:

Correct:

The head of the FCC says his agency will investigate:

They should also revisit the siren incident in 2017, when Obama was still in the White House. Note the time and date:

In the meantime, CNN can resume normal service and criticise the Trumps for not owning a dog.

——————————————————————————————

UPDATE: ‘Worker who sent out Hawaii missile alert is reassigned’ (New York Post, January 14, 2018)

The Hawaii public employee who plunged the state into chaos by accidentally sending out an incoming-missile emergency alert Saturday has been reassigned, according to reports.

The unnamed emergency department worker will not be fired because he made an honest mistake, Hawaii Emergency Management Agency spokesman Richard Rapoza told the Washington Post

The agency has already put in place new safeguards to prevent such a misfire — including a “cancel” button that will immediately send out corrective alerts if an erroneous warning is issued, officials said Sunday.

Further reading:

‘Hawaii releases timeline of what transpired after false ballistic missile warning’

On Friday, November 3, 2017, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump began their first tour of Asia.

Their first stop was Hawaii, where they stayed overnight before flying to Japan.

The Conservative Treehouse has an excellent report on the visit. Their agenda for the first day was as follows:

♦ 1:10pm local / 7:10pm Eastern THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive in Hickam, HI – Hickam Air Force Base
♦ 1:45pm local / 7:45pm Eastern THE PRESIDENT participates in a United States Pacific Command briefing, Aiea, HI
♦ 5:25PM local / 11:25pm Eastern THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY participate in a tour of the USS Arizona Memorial, Aiea, HI

Upon arrival, the Trumps were greeted in true Hawaiian fashion (emphases mine below):

The President and First Lady were greeted with leis by Hawaii Gov. David Ige and his wife, Dawn Ige along with US Navy Admiral Harry Harris, commander of the US Pacific Command, his wife, Bruni Bradley; and Mikayla Webb, the daughter of Adm. Harris’ aide.

President Trump was given a brightly colored orange and yellow lei decorated with Maile & Ilima flowers, a combination traditionally presented to royalty on the island. The first couple spent about 15 minutes shaking hands with a group of greeters, a mix of troops and civilians at the airport:

President Trump participated in a United States Pacific Command briefing, Aiea, HI:

The Trumps then toured the USS Arizona memorial in Honolulu. The Daily Mail has an outstanding set of photographs and a brief report.

They placed a memorial wreath at the monument remembering American soldiers who died nearly 80 years ago in the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Trumps also threw hibiscus flowers on to the sea in memory of the fallen.

The First Lady was visibly moved:

They arrived in Japan on Sunday, November 5 as guests of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Mrs Akie Abe.

The Conservative Treehouse has the day’s schedule:

♦ 10:45am (local) / 9:45pm (EST) THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive in Tokyo, Japan.

♦ 11:00am (local) / 10:00pm (EST) THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY participate in a Yokota Air Base troop event. – Yokota Air Base, Japan

♦ 12:05pm (local) / 11:05pm (EST) THE PRESIDENT has lunch with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan and professional Japanese golfer Mr. Hideki Matsuyama. – Kasumigaseki Country Club, Kawagoe, Japan

♦ 12:45pm (local) / 11:45pm (EST) THE PRESIDENT golfs with Japanese Prime Minister Abe and Mr. Hideki Matsuyama. – Kasumigaseki Country Club, Kawagoe, Japan

♦ 7:35pm (local) / 5:35am (EST) THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY have dinner with Prime Minster Abe and Mrs. Akie Abe – Ginza Ukai Tei, Tokyo, Japan

Reuters reported that this was the longest presidential trip to Asia since George H W Bush’s in 1992.

Security throughout the country was tight as bomb threats had been made in several cities.

These two videos show some of Saturday’s events — arrival in Tokyo and the president’s address to the troops at Yokota Air Force Base:

The Trump and Abe delegations ate lunch together:

While their husbands discussed official business, Mrs Abe and Mrs Trump spent time together meeting schoolchildren, who sang to them:

President and Mrs Trump met with some very special people that day:

They were most grateful:

Prime Minister Abe and President Trump met privately before holding a joint press conference:

The two couples ended the day with dinner at Ginza Ukai Tei, the flagship of the upmarket Ukai restaurant chain in Tokyo. The restaurant’s speciality is teppanyaki:

Bloomberg reported that Ukai Co. stock soared on Monday. As for the menu:

The guests were served a “special menu,” which included grilled Hokkaido scallop, the restaurant’s “best quality” steak and a chocolate sundae, according to a spokeswoman for Ukai.

On Monday, President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump were greeted by Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko at the Imperial Residence in Tokyo at about 11:03 am for a 30-minute meeting. The Conservative Treehouse has excellent photos of their meeting each other for the first time.

Here is a tweet from elsewhere:

Trump did not say he didn’t bow to anyone. The caption refers to his predecessor:

The Trumps returned to Akasaka Palace, where the Abes gave them a welcome ceremony. Trump and Abe also reviewed the troops. Lunch followed.

Afterwards, Abe and Trump fed koi carp. Contrary to what you saw on the mainstream news, Trump followed Abe’s example:

That evening, the Abes hosted a state dinner for the Trumps at Akasaka Palace:

The lady below is the glamorous White House Communications Director Hope Hicks, who used to work for Ivanka Trump before her father whisked her (Hicks) away to work on his presidential campaign. (If you understand the CNN reporter’s humour, please let me know.)

Prime Minister Abe addressed the guests, followed by President Trump (here is another view):

 

The White House provided a transcript of their remarks, most of which follow:

PRIME MINISTER ABE: (As interpreted.) …

Yesterday’s golf diplomacy between Donald and me attracted so much attention, and we actually made everything public, except for the score. And, through golf, we could demonstrate to the world how strong the bond is between Japan and the United States.

But Donald and I are not the first to promote this unique golf diplomacy. Just 60 years ago, my grandfather, Prime Minister Kishi, and President Eisenhower are the ones who initiated this tradition. And after the golf match, President Eisenhower shared two lessons with my grandfather. One, once you become a President of the United States, you need to be at a table with a group of people whom you don’t like to hang out. Second, when it comes to playing golf, you can play golf only with those who you really, really like to hang out.

But speaking of my relationship with President Trump, that is not enough. If I may add another lesson to the legacy of Prime Minister Kishi and President Eisenhower, I would say it like this: When you play golf with someone not just once, but for two times, the person must be your favorite guy.

So, yesterday, we had the pleasure of playing golf together with Mr. Hideki Matsuyama. And, tonight, we are so honored to have the participation of Mr. Isao Aoki, who is a pioneer in Japanese golf. (Applause.)

Speaking of the First Ladies, I understand that my wife Akie and Madam First Lady had a chance to try Japanese calligraphy. Each wrote one Chinese character, or kanji: “hei” by Madam First Lady, which means being smooth and calm; and “wa” by my wife Akie, which stands for harmony. And when combined, these two letters literally mean “peace.” And I think their wonderful joint work represents our alliance very nicely.

Under our alliance, Japan and the United States work hand-in-hand to contribute to regional and global peace.

For two days, President Trump and I spent many, many hours together, and had an in-depth discussion on various global challenges. And I’m particularly grateful for President Trump and Madam First Lady, who kindly spent their time with a former abductee and the family members of those who had been abducted by North Korea.

Last but not least, let me share with you my honest impression about President Trump’s visit to Japan this time. As I said, this was the very first visit by President Trump and it was indeed a historic visit. And I do hope that you will enjoy your last night in Tokyo as you wish. And also, I sincerely hope that you will have a really successful trip to Asia this time, which started here in Japan.

So with that, I now would like to propose a toast wishing all the best to President Trump and Madam First Lady, and also wishing for the further development of the friendship between Japan and the United States.

(A toast is offered.) (Applause.)

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Prime Minister and Mrs. Abe, this has been a really wonderful two days. We have to spend more time together because I have enjoyed every minute of it, even though he’s a very, very tough negotiator. And, Melania, a real friend of yours now is Mrs. Abe. And I know you enjoyed it with me. You enjoyed it in Florida and you enjoyed it here, and maybe even more so. But I want to thank you for the royal welcome.

And it was really a — very much a working holiday, even on the golf course. So we can call it a couple of days off, but it wasn’t. It was full work. Even as we played golf, all we did was talk about different things. (Laughter.) We better not go into it. But I have to tell you, we did, and we made a lot of progress on a lot of fronts.

I do want to congratulate Mr. Aoki. He was one of the great putters — probably still is. They say you never lose your putting. When you’re a great putter, you never lose your putting …

And I spoke yesterday with the great Matsuyama, who is doing great, right? He’s going to be a big star, and he’s going to be great. I don’t even know if he’s with us tonight. I don’t think he’s with us tonight. But he does want to get together in New York, and we’re going to get together …

So my relationship with Shinzo got off to quite a rocky start because I never ran for office, and here I am. But I never ran, so I wasn’t very experienced. And after I had won, everybody was calling me from all over the world. I never knew we had so many countries. (Laughter.)

So I was now President-elect. But I didn’t know you were supposed to not see world leaders until after you were in office, which was January 20th. So you were just not supposed to because it was considered bad form. It was not a nice thing to do, and I understand that from the standpoint of the President whose place you were taking.

So you can only take so many calls from world leaders — because, you know, everybody was calling. But Japan, you take. And some others — we took Germany, we took Russia, we took China, we took — we took your Prime Minister.

So it’s November, and he said to me, “Congratulations on your victory, it was a great victory, I would like to see you. I would like to see you as soon as possible.” And I said, “Anytime you want, just come on in, don’t worry about it.” But I was referring to after January 20th. (Laughter.) So I said, don’t worry about it. Anytime you want, I look forward to seeing you. Just give us a call, no problem, anytime you want. And all of the sudden, I get a call from, actually, Japan press. And they said that our Prime Minister is going to New York to meet with the President-elect.

So the press is going crazy because the Prime Minister of Japan is coming to see me. I think it’s absolutely fine, but I didn’t really mean now. I meant some time in February, March, or April. Meaning, you have a very aggressive — very, very aggressive, strong, tough Prime Minister. That’s a good thing, by the way — not a bad thing. (Laughter.)

So then the New York media started calling me, and I was getting all sorts of signals from Hope and Sarah, in a different position, and everybody. And they’re going crazy. They’re saying, “You cannot see him. It’s so inappropriate. It looks bad.” I say, “What’s wrong?” They said, “It’s a bad thing to see him. You have to wait until after, in all fairness, Barack Obama leaves office.” And I said, “What do I do?” And they said, “Let’s call.”

So I called him, and he wasn’t there. He was on the airplane flying to New York. (Laughter.) And I said, “You know what? There’s no way he’s going to land and I’m not seeing him.”

So I saw him, and it worked out just fine. Do you agree with that? (Laughter.) And he actually brought me the most beautiful golf club I’ve ever seen. It was a driver that’s totally gold. Right? It’s gold. (Laughter.) And I looked at it — I said, “If I ever use this driver — me — to use that driver at a golf club, I will be laughed off every course I ever go onto.” But it is the most beautiful weapon I’ve ever seen, so I thank you for that.

But we had a great meeting. It lasted forever. It was a very long meeting in Trump Tower. And for some reason, from that moment on, we had a really — and developed a really great relationship. And here we are today and better than ever, and we’re going to work together. And it’s going to get more and more special, and we’re going to work out problems of Japan and problems of the United States. And it’s going to be something very, very special for both countries.

And I just want to finish by saying that Melania and I today visited the palace. This is a beautiful, beautiful place. And we met two very beautiful people, the Imperial Majesties, the Emperor and the Empress, and spent a long time talking to them today. And there was a lot of love in that room for all of you people — I can tell you — from everyone from Japan. They love the people of Japan, they love this country dearly, and they have great, great respect for your Prime Minister. And they truly think that your Prime Minister did very, very well when he decided to marry — or she decided to marry him, Mrs. Abe. But they have great, great respect — I can tell you that.

And I just want to conclude by saying that our two great countries will have incredible friendship and incredible success for many centuries to come — not years, not decades, but for many centuries to come.

And again, it’s an honor to have you as my good friend, and I just want to thank you and Mrs. Abe. This is a very, very special two days. We will not forget, and we will be back soon. Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you very much, everybody. Thank you.

(A toast is offered.) (Applause.)

President Trump toasted with cola.

The dinner was the last event of the Trumps’ visit to Japan:

Trump tweeted:

There may well be some significance to +++, which I think relates to the Storm (draining the Swamp) rather than Japan. See this 4chan/pol/ post.

Tomorrow’s post will cover Korea.

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