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On Saturday, May 16, I tuned into France’s news channel BFMTV to see how the nation’s partial reopening went.

President Emmanuel Macron got an earful from medical professionals at La Pitié-Salpêtrière, the Paris hospital he visited on Friday, May 15. Late last week, he announced that, at this year’s Bastille Day ceremonies, health professionals and first responders would be honoured with medals commemorating their work during the coronavirus crisis. On Friday, as Macron was leaving, a health professional told him that he didn’t want any medal. Macron snapped back:

If you don’t want it, don’t take it.

It was a rough visit. A group of nurses listened to what he had to say, then one spoke up, bluntly demanding more pay and more recognition. Macron said that he was giving them a bonus for their work over the past two months, but she retorted that was not enough. She demanded a pay rise for all nurses, which is fair enough. They are on relatively low pay, not far from minimum wage.

Going back a few years when the erstwhile Conservative prime minister François Fillon (serving under Nicolas Sarkozy from 2007-2012) visited a care home during his tenure, he was able to hold a calm, considered conversation with the workers there, who were all CGT union members:

Allow me a small digression from Macron. François Fillon should have been France’s president after François Hollande. Unfortunately, the media put the boot into him for corruption, just as he was at a massive height in the popularity polls in January 2017, the year Macron was elected president.

In March 2020, Fillon was sentenced to two years in prison, with an additional three years suspended sentence. His wife was given a suspended three-year prison term and a fine of €375,000. (Source: Le Point.) Trumped up (no pun intended) or what? Something stinks there. The Fillons are a dignified couple who have kept to themselves over the years. They are low-profile people and devout Catholics.

This was François Fillon’s agenda for France in 2017: ending bureaucracy, sorting out France’s problems and restoring the pride in being French. In short: make France great again. Does that sound familiar?

How sad that it didn’t happen and might never happen. Who will accomplish this now?

I agree with the tweet below that the framing of François Fillon is truly a shame for France.

The video is from 2017:

These replies say that Fillon’s three-year plan, summarised above, was simply swept — balayé– under the carpet (by left-wing media, which started with one outlet and spread rapidly to the others):

Returning to the present day, a Parisian MP from France Insoumise (Unbowed France) says that it is urgent for Macron to say how soon the pay increase will be delivered and how much it will be. The second tweet includes one from health minister Olivier Véran, commenting on the ‘passionate’ feedback from the nurses:

Macron has been the latest French president to further shrink the nation’s health system, following Nicolas Sarkozy (Conservative) and François Hollande (Socialist), both in terms of hospital beds and other measures. Hospital masks were in short supply during the height of the coronavirus crisis. French housewives banded together from their homes to sew fabric masks for nurses. While those were technically useless, nonetheless, nurses were grateful for any protection whilst awaiting proper face coverings.

Early Saturday afternoon, BFMTV reported on the mask shortage, discovered in January 2020. However, it was too late, even with Macron’s government’s requisitioning every surgical mask in France. They were the wrong type of masks, but they would have to do. Hospital and care workers were desperate.

One physician working on the front line in Lyon died because he did not have the right type of mask. He caught coronavirus and, despite treatment in Marseille, never recovered. His widow and two daughters are suing the hospital where he worked. I can’t see how that will work, because every hospital experienced the same mask shortage.

Currently, there are enough masks for people living in France, who have been strongly encouraged to wear one outdoors. These are not proper coronavirus masks, but they will have to do.

It appears that Macron now has to get on with his promised reform — improvement — of a beleaguered health system. Here’s an inside look at his control room:

The replies to this tweet featuring an LREM MP are interesting. The MP says that a centralised health system doesn’t work, but the replies say that the system has been sclerotic for some time, Macron has ignored calls for improvement and there are too many hospital administrators and/or politicians involved rather than medical professionals. The response I’ve included below says that Germany spends far less money than France and has better performing hospitals, with four times more intensive care beds:

However, another BFMTV journalist reported that Macron is facing a crisis in other aspects of French society, including the gilets jaunes (yellow jackets). They are still protesting in some cities on Saturdays, although not in as great a number as before the coronavirus crisis:

Making matters worse, Macron’s political party, LREM, no longer has an absolute majority in parliament:

Ten of his MPs have left to form their own party with ten other MPs — Ecologie, démocratie, solidarité:

It is unclear whether that will have any impact on the second round of local elections, rescheduled for June 28:

However, one commentator said that Macron’s success as president will largely depend on how he and his government handle the coronavirus crisis this year. He has a few years left in his first term, which ends in 2022.

Meanwhile, during the first weekend of partial reopening, BFMTV reminded viewers that they are not allowed to travel further than 100km from home. They also cannot not leave the house to visit anyone, including relatives, unless they are going to drop something off. Visiting second homes is also forbidden. The French are allowed to travel to work, to school, to a child minder, for a funeral, for a medical appointment, for recreational purposes (limited at this point) or to shops that are open:

Late last week, some beaches in France opened so that people could have a new way of exercising. For now, reopening beaches is up to individual mayors. As the virus is still active, the beaches are ‘dynamic’, meaning that sitting or sunning oneself is strictly forbidden. Fishing is also forbidden. Beachgoers can walk, swim and surf. A one-way system is in place with an entrance and an exit:

The second tweet says, ‘This increasing surveillance is seriously getting on my nerves’:

Interior minister Christophe Castaner visited a beach in Normandy that was preparing to reopen. He said that everyone visiting beaches had to respect the rules in place, otherwise they will be closed. He hopes that beaches will reopen fully during the summer:

For those who miss culture, small museums, with hygiene restrictions in place, may reopen:

Driving schools can also open. There is no social distancing in the car, so the car windows must be open at all times during the lesson. Those taking virtual instruction are socially distanced. Driving tests can begin in June, provided there is no second wave of coronavirus:

Those worried about the impact of more drivers on the environment need not be too concerned. During lockdown, there was only a 7% decrease in particulates. That is surprising:

At 2 p.m. on Saturday afternoon, Lourdes reopened, even if there are no dine-in restaurants. It will attract locals until travel restrictions are lifted:

Speaking of health and healing, coronavirus testing continues. In Brittany, a new cluster of infections was discovered at an abattoir:

Elsewhere in France, new infections were found in schools that reopened last week. Those schools are now closed:

One Frenchman might have a future solution to school closures. He is developing a fabric that kills coronavirus. This video shows his chair and desk covers:

Where schools remained open, this is what the scene looked like outdoors. Recess must have been fun (not). This is so SAD, beyond belief:

France’s medical agency has found that 500 medications are harmful in treating coronavirus. Incredibly, hydroxychloroquine is among them. This has to be the establishment’s figurative poke in the eye at Prof Didier Raoult, Marseille’s champion in treating patients with the drug combined with azithromycin:

The article says, in part:

Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) represents the majority of adverse cardiac reactions, in 141 out of 159 cases. Cardiac reactions comprise 69% of those reported, versus 44% where Kaletra (an antiretroviral combining lopinavir and ritonavir) is used …

The number of deaths linked to hydroxychloroquine in hospital remains at four. In view of these risks, the health agency advises that these drugs, when used against Covid-19, must be used as a priority only in the context of ongoing clinical trials.

In general, provided there is no sizeable second wave of infections, more businesses will be able to open at the beginning of June.

Philippe Etchebest, who is a chef, restaurateur, television celebrity and MOF (maître ouvrier de France), says that restaurants must reopen as soon as possible, because the government cannot afford to keep them closed. The subsidies are ‘colossal’:

Last month, Etchebest said that partial reopening will not work. Social distancing — e.g. halving the number of tables — will not bring in enough revenue. Perhaps he will be employing one of these social distancing methods:

Recently, the loathsome globalist Jacques Attali said that restaurateurs must change their business model.

Etchebest took strong objection to that, saying that he is neither a grocer nor a wine merchant. Those replying to this tweet also criticised Attali, saying he should shut up for once or retire to a nursing home. The quote from Attali on the internet is interesting:

The internet represents a danger to those in the know and those who decide things, because it gives access to information outside of received knowledge.

Bravo, Philippe:

Attali was one of Emmanuel Macron’s early mentors. Go figure.

No wonder the French are angry.

Along with every other country, Britain entered a lockdown so as not to overwhelm the health system during the coronavirus outbreak.

Ours has been running since the evening of Monday, March 23.

It is now time for the government and medical officials to consider winding it down in phases.

There are two reasons for this, outside of economic considerations:

1/ The emergency Nightingale hospital for coronavirus patients had 40 as of April 18;

2/ Private hospitals that the NHS seconded for coronavirus patients are empty.

On April 18, the Mail on Sunday reported that those private hospitals have staff doing nothing while their previously scheduled operations on private patients have been cancelled (emphases mine):

Senior clinicians at private hospitals claim hundreds of the country’s best doctors have been left ‘twiddling their thumbs’ during the outbreak – putting people’s health at risk from other illnesses and postponed operations.

Last month, 8,000 beds in private hospitals across the country were taken under public control. NHS England said 20,000 fully qualified staff in the hospitals, including 700 doctors, were needed to battle Covid-19.

But on Saturday night, one London-based consultant orthopaedic surgeon said: ‘What we are seeing at the moment is a sinful and shocking mass of empty private hospitals and empty beds.

‘Most of them are gathering dust, with a whole load of doctors twiddling their thumbs. And it’s costing the NHS millions.’

The surgeon said only ‘emergency’ and ‘time-critical’ operations were being allowed at his hospital, adding: ‘I have a waiting list of 25 people who need major operations right now. One with severe arthritis is crying out in pain every night, unable to sleep.

‘I was asked, “Is there anything you can do?” I had to say “Nothing”, and advised her to take painkillers.’

A second medic said his hospital was ‘fairly empty and under used’ while another said he was ‘pretty bored’. ‘I am unsure if the hospitals are being used in the most efficient way,’ he admitted.

A fourth doctor said private hospitals in north London were ‘largely empty’ despite repeated offers to help out with patients from overrun NHS wards.

At least four private hospitals are currently treating coronavirus patients. But the numbers are likely to be very low as there have only been 15 Covid-19 deaths between them, according to official figures.

In March, this was a good strategy. In April, less so:

Another doctor added: ‘Preparing for an epidemic is a very difficult balance. If you get it right, it’s by pure luck.’ 

However, he warned that more people could end up dying early of illnesses like cancer and heart disease: ‘At what point does the cost of this ‘medical lockdown’ to people’s health outweigh the benefits?’

Just so.

Things have turned out better than we in Britain expected. That is excellent news. Overall, the NHS has not been overwhelmed to breaking point with COVID-19 patients.

On the other hand, I read anecdotally daily of people, like the aforementioned lady with severe arthritis, who are waiting for operations for other ailments and diseases.

It’s time to let the private hospitals treat the previously scheduled patients.

It is also time for the government to phase out the lockdown beginning in May, before our economy plummets totally and more people become gravely ill or die.

There is a fascinating thread on Guido Fawkes, posted on Sunday, March 29.

The subject of the post is cabinet minister Michael Gove saying we don’t need ventilators from the EU, but the comments are on Britons’ personal coronavirus experiences.

I found them vastly more informative and interesting than Big Media’s panicky news. I hope you do, too.

Unfortunately, Guido’s new comment system does not have hyperlinks to comments, so I cannot provide direct links.

A dash denotes a single comment, even with an additional paragraph.

I purposely didn’t edit the comments too much in order to preserve their spontaneity.

Emphases below are mine.

PPE, ventilators and the EU

These days, PPE stands for Personal Protection Equipment, not the degree known as Philosophy, Politics and Economics.

This pertains to Gove’s comments in Guido’s post. A few of Guido’s readers discussed France. One had sources:

On March 3, France confiscated all protective masks made in the country. “We will distribute them to healthcare professionals and to French people affected by the coronavirus,” French President Emmanuel Macron wrote on Twitter. On March 6, the French government forced Valmy SAS, a face mask manufacturer near Lyon, to cancel an order for millions of masks placed by the UK’s National Health Service.

In general, however, re the EU:

We wouldn’t get any ventilators. They’d be sent straight to the other member states.

We would pay for them, though.

More about ventilators on the Continent. I think the first comment comes from a lady in the Netherlands:

– Too right. Netherlands has 1110 ventilators, it has as of today over 1k in icu and not a sniff of any new ventilators being provided, in fact they had to fight tooth and nail to purchase gloves and masks, they managed to purchase just over 620k of them last week from outside the EU and Dutch companies who wanted up to 300% on top of the usual costs, the Dutch companies not the ones outside, including a Dutch crowdfunding initiative that purchased over 200k of them on top of the 620k these are the only medical supplies to have arrived, unless I’m mistaken they are both EU members and party to the EU ventilator scheme. The EU can’t even share basic supplies amongst its members … much needed ventilators, Germany and France even refused to send medical supplies stating their needs could be greater, not where “could be” when Italy asked for help. Note the only help currently acceptable to mutti [Angela Merkel] is for all member states that accrue financial debts over and above the EU budgetary allowance is to sign financial agreements the same as Greece did, in other words so that Germany and the IMF benefit on interest accrued on bonds, even the Spanish, and Polish governments, some Dutch MEPs are publicly declaring the lack of help coming from Ursula [von der Leyen] of any kind, note the border issue of the Greeks is disappearing from headlines at a rate of knots at the same time.

Salvini called the EU “a nest of snakes and jackals” the other day, that Italy would “get past the virus and say goodbye to the EU without thanking them”. An understandable sentiment.

Meanwhile, back in Blighty:

Mr Dyson probably could, he has an engineering center of excellence (both design and manufacturing) down there in Malmsbury, and also a mothballed production facility that until recently used to make high quality goods out of injection-moulded plastic components and electric motors. With resources like that in this country, I don’t think we’ll be short of ventilators for long.

The Italians are pissed off that Germany is refusing to sell them any ventilators, maybe we’ll soon be in a position to help them out.

More testing = more coronavirus cases

The number of coronavirus cases is increasing in many countries, because they, including the UK, are now being able to test for the virus (emphasis in the original):

– The latest data from the German Robert Koch Institute show that the increase in test-positive persons is proportional to the increase in the number of tests, i.e. in percentage terms it remains roughly the same. This may indicate that the increase in the number of cases is mainly due to an increase in the number of tests, and not due to an ongoing epidemic.

– Actually a proportionate increase in cases would be nearer to proving that the virus was everywhere anyway.

Coronavirus deaths

As of Sunday, March 29 (emphases in the original in this section):

– 2433 new cases and 209 new deaths

– Of ALL the UK Coronavirus fatalities to date, ONLY 13 had NO pre-existing conditions.

Without being insensitive, the vast majority of the fatalities to date would probably have died from “typical” seasonal ‘Flu anyway. Obviously, things could rapidly change if people ignore social distancing, but we aren’t at crisis levels for the moment.

Other deaths

Coronavirus notwithstanding, sadly, other people leave this mortal coil, too:

How many other deaths today?

– About 50,000 deaths a month is the average I believe. About 12,500 a week.

– Meanwhile other people die in less than acceptable circumstances.

A neighbour’s mother was ill in hospital and visiting was not allowed. She was discharged to a nursing home last week, where she died yesterday. Her daughter was unable to visit or comfort her. She died effectively alone in the company of presumably masked and protected strangers.

This is not humane.

The weekly death toll gets rather confusing, because some are referencing flu/respiratory deaths per week, while others are looking at the bigger picture:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EUSFPnoXgAAAEh8?format=jpg&name=large

See more here.

Dr Neil Ferguson

Dr Neil Ferguson OBE (!) of the dodgy Imperial College London numbers on coronavirus — as well as for the equally dodgy strategy on the 2001 foot and mouth outbreak — came in for criticism. This is the best of the comments about him (emphases mine):

What was never reported after the disastrous foot and mouth case modelled by Ferguson, were the depressions and suicides by farmers who not only had to watch whole herds of healthy cattle being slaughtered but losing three or four generations of their family farms. Many ended up selling to rich property developers to survive and thousands more turned their farms into industrial units.

Why wasn’t Ferguson sacked? How did he manage to survive to work on the Swine Flu … and again on Covid19?

Just goes to show the public sector are never accountable and always protected. At least Mr Trump is from a business background and knows how to disseminate good advice and bad advice wherever it comes from.

Potentially dangerous lockdown

If this lockdown extends far beyond Easter into late spring or early summer, Guido’s readers fear problems not only for Britons’ health but also for the economy. Their fears are not misplaced:

– There are many doctors saying the results of a long lockdown will be far worse than any mortality rate from this virus.

– And the tragedies arising from the ensuing economic depression will dwarf both of them put together.

– Exactly. I’m in the ‘over 60’s’ bracket but would rather risk getting a fec kin bad case of flu than see a lifetime of work pensions and savings go down the swanny because of some unhealthy eaters from China.

I agree. I’m not wasting 6 months of my life at my age under house arrest.

What, the ‘lockdown’ that the government tried to warn everyone not to do too early so that we weren’t asking the people to do too much for too long, but that the media wouldn’t listen and screamed like spoilt brats until they got their way?

That lockdown?

That leads us nicely to the next section.

BBC

BBC reporters are everywhere, not only across Britain but around the world:

– It is very important to stay at home. I know because we have just been told by a BBC reporter standing outside the Palace of Westminster.

– Have you ever wondered about all the ‘reporters’ wondering around in places like Lombardy etc. without any protection…Are they immune?

– Yes, the ghastly Mark Eaton was doing that last week. Walking the streets of London, stopping people and demanding to know why they were walking the streets of London.

It is OK for him though because he thinks he is important.

BBC news continues its Trump Derangement Syndrome:

– When will the BBC stop saying that the USA is the country with the fastest growing number of infections and deaths? It’s a bloody continent!

– They won’t stop, the BBC is anti US/UK and although the US isn’t a continent its scale and population make it comparable to Western Europe which has a far bigger problem.

– So true. If you check on some of their reporters (Twitter etc.) you will see that there is an obsession with Trump but little interest in some of the despots elsewhere. Are they afraid of the repercussions?

Andrew Marr, presenter of the BBC’s Sunday morning news show, came in for particular criticism. No surprise there:

– Marr has an anti-government agenda that is clear to everyone I hope. How this guy is still working is beyond me.

– He is a Marxist with an anti government agenda. The only surprise is the BBC has not made him Director General yet.

– There’s a fine line between questioning the government to find out information and questioning to discredit. Marr is in the second camp.

Socialist celebrities

Most people are fed up with wealthy socialist celebrities:

I’ll tell you why I’m a socialist: poverty. Poverty is what makes you a socialist. When you know poverty then you know about how we have to take care of people.” Actor Brian Cox.

Actually Brian, I’ll tell you why I’m NOT a socialist: poverty. Poverty is what results from socialism. When you know poverty then you know about how we have to take care of people and as history and experience shows, socialism is not the answer. I will go further and suggest you are actually a believer in a mixed economy which is underpinned by a healthy capitalism required for creating the wealth necessary for the public services you and me both desire. You are not really a socialist, you just don’t understand.

Someone replied:

If Cox is so keen why doesn’t he go and live in the socialist heaven of Venezuela rather than the capitalist hell of New York City?

Actors aren’t the only ones, either:

Same with singers (‘Bonio’ springs to mind). Just sing yer song and shut yer gob. Your fame does not make you an expert and your loud pronouncements are meaningless in the scheme of things.

Hospitals

There were many interesting anecdotal reports about hospitals. I have separated the A&E comments into a separate section.

This one came from Scotland:

Are we getting the true news about how the NHS and nurses/docs are coping? I see a lot of interviews and quotes from medics saying they are making life and death decisions due to ‘lack of equipment’.

However last Thursday I had to take my good lady into Aberdeen Royal Infirmary for a rather serious examination (she has risk of cancer down below). Apart from a guy at the main entrance making sure everyone used the hand gel, once at the ward we were allocated I had to wait outside in the main corridor and beside the 6 lifts in a colour red zone. One of the wards in this zone is ICU and further down the corridor it was into the Sick Childrens Hospital section. However it amazed me to see how much the nurses/docs/porters didn’t seem to have any concerns about walking around the corridors, mobile phone checking, 5 into a lift, porters not wearing protective gloves, leaving wheelchairs without wiping down the handles etc. Before anyone gets on to me I am not criticising those people just the media panic. As far as I could tell, apart from the multi storey car park being less busy with visitors the hospital was to all intents and purposes ‘as normal’.

As I say don’t berate me for posting this and I rather like the way all those staff were laughing, joking as they always do but it did seem a different world in there than what I expected.

Someone replied, saying the media were not interested in hospitals operating as usual:

There are over 300 hospitals in Scotland with 8 in Aberdeen and 11 others in the surrounding county. There are 1245 cases in Scotland (4 per hospital if shared out equally) and chances are that they would likely try and isolate COVID19 patients as much as possible so whilst the number of cases are fairly low I imagine they would try to place the COVID19 patients in as few hospitals as possible so it could be that there weren’t any CV cases at the Aberdeen Royal Infirmary.

That will be different to London (over 5,000 cases) and the Midlands (2,500 cases) where I know that the number of cases far and away outstrips the number of vacant beds that those NHS regions reported last quarter end (Dec 31).

So I very much think it depends on whether you are in a hotzone or not and if you are not you can guarantee the national media just ain’t interested. There is no news in ‘business as usual’ in the middle of a crisis

PS You’re right its good that there is still significant normality out there and presumably the lock down will see a fall off in certain types of hospitalisations but the media are never going to try and sell that narrative. Good news is no news.

Ventilators

Ventilators came up for discussion:

I don’t think the public have understood how long you stay on a ventilator with this SARS2. It is 2-3 weeks, not the 2-3 days with normal winter ailments.

You go on to a ventilator with this she hit you’re 50/50 at best with perma damage.

– … people who need to go onto ventilators for this virus would have to for other reasons as well.

– If you go onto Conservative Woman website there is an interesting article about Matt Strauss saying that ventilators are the least necessary thing. The people who have to go onto a ventilator because of Covid19 would already need it.

Long term forced ventilation has issues of its own.

A&E (Accident & Emergency) wards

There were reports about quiet A&E wards.

This one came from one of the Home Counties, just outside London:

I might have said this once or twice before- but my wife works in A&E (for a hospital that was recently in the news) and it is very quiet in there and there is no shortages or panic.

The hospital in question is set up for the worst.

But at the moment they are dealing with the usual real emergency cases and very few suspected cases.

That is not to say some have supposedly died from Covid- but the 21 year old didn’t- despite press reports (which the Guardian has since removed). Kudos to them for once.

Here’s another from somewhere else in the UK:

My wife passed me this posted on her Military Wives Facebook group by an NHS Paramedic member of the same group. It makes amazingly good sense…

Small rant… Having spent at least 12 hours per day for the last 8 out of 9 days in and out of A&E I have noticed one thing. The waiting rooms have been MASSIVELY less busy than normal.

There is a major health emergency going on and suddenly everyone can manage to deal with their little booboo themselves. Whilst I, as a paramedic, am extremely grateful for this, please as a nation get a grip and realise this is what you should have been doing anyway for years.

You would have saved the NHS literally billions of pounds, so once this hell is over please continue to be a brave little soldier and deal with these non-emergencies yourselves!

WELL SAID & HOW TRUE

Are A&Es empty because of fear or a sudden dawning of common sense?

Most of the departments of my local General Hospital are quiet which allows their staff to be redeployed where needed. The specialist A&E a few miles up the road is also reporting almost a complete lack of people attending with trivial injuries and the ambo service aren’t getting the usual 80/20 split of unnecessary/justified 999 calls. Could it be that the time wasters are actually getting some common sense?

Here’s the reply:

Unfortunately, no.

The muppets are more frightened of being with other people than their headache.

Another account rolled in:

I can substantiate that. Over the last couple of weeks I had to go to the hospital for pre-arranged but necessary scans. On both occasions the A&E waiting area was virtually deserted apart from staff.

Truth:

The amount of money wasted on hypochondria in the NHS is huge.

Supermarkets

Online deliveries have not improved since the panic buying nearly a month ago. This holds true even for the elderly, whom, the government says, supermarkets have prioritised:

A mate of mine who is over 70 enquired last weekend about a home delivery from either Sainsburys or Tesco (I forget which one) and was told it would be delivered on 19th April. He said no thanks and drove to the shop himself.

Shelves seem to be restocked. A return to normality — for now:

We went shopping in Aldi Friday morning 8am, 30 people in the queue ahead of us but we all went straight in at 8. Bought everything we wanted including a small joint of beef, perhaps people have stopped panic buying at last. But if the Govt bring in more restrictions on movement expect the panic buying/hoarding to take off again.

Another Aldi customer concurs:

Likewise at Aldi, Whitby last Thursday, and everyone behaving sensibly.

Elsewhere:

Just been out to M&S and Lidl. Both fully stocked.

A few have installed a one-metre distance between customer and the person behind the till. Others have installed perspex shields:

Much easier to clean perspex shields and they are further away from the cashier. It’s better solution than face a mask for that particular purpose.

On the lighter side …

There were a few jokes, too.

We had tennis …

– I just got back yesterday after going to my mate’s funeral. Sadly he got hit on the head with a tennis ball. It was a great service.

– Are your tennis racket jokes free or do they come with strings attached?

… a plumber with a marital problems …

He went home recently and said to his wife, It’s over Flo.

… and the lockdown:

Wife: Are you going to sit on that sofa all day?

Me: No, I shall be sitting on the other sofa shortly.

Conclusion

I shall conclude with this comment:

If the MSM hadn`t created the panic, the authorities wouldn`t have had a population willing to have their civil liberties curtailed.

I fully agree.

Please be very careful when listening to the news and reading newspapers. There was no need, no need at all, for a shutdown or the Coronavirus Bill.

Emergency Medicine is a physician’s speciality which has to do with the Emergency Room, or, as we (used to) say in the UK, Casualty.

A young doctor, Rick Pescatore, from New Jersey has a fascinating Twitter thread (also on Thread reader) explaining his choice of speciality:

One day, a poor, desperate woman arrived at the ER when Dr Pescatore was on duty. She had a broken tooth, which he says is extremely painful when the exposed nerve comes into contact with air.

His supervisor responded:

I was happy to see that he got many supportive comments and was able to take the time to respond to several.

I hope that Dr Pescatore, his supervisor and other dedicated ER staff are richly blessed this year — along with their patients.

May the good Lord watch over them all.

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