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Yesterday, I profiled The Rebel Media’s Jack Posobiec, whom Emmanuel Macron is targetting for summarising news on his financial affairs based on a data dump from 4chan.

In that post, I mentioned a much more incriminating Twitter hash tag than the one Posobiec was posting on.

#EmmanuelCahuzac was used by the French to discuss financial documents that came out in French media earlier this year — at a time when North Americans were largely unaware of them.

My post on Posobiec explains why #EmmanuelCahuzac is so called. (There is also #MacronCahuzac.) Again, no one is implying that Macron was involved in the Cahuzac affair. People commenting are concerned that Macron’s financial situation, if investigated, could be of the same magnitude. No one wants to see another Cahuzac affair, which took three years to investigate.

That said, as far back as February 25 — before these hashtags were created — a Twitter user asked people not to forget that Macron got his start in politics thanks to Dr Cahuzac, a surgeon, later parliamentarian, who served as junior minister to the budget in François Hollande’s administration. He is now serving three years in prison, as of December 2016:

Earlier that month, on February 3, Le Figaro reported that Macron was quick off the mark in winning the support of the former anti-corruption judge Eric Halphen in Lyon. It could stand him in good stead.

On February 18, a Journal du Dimanche (JDD, ‘Sunday Journal’) article asked probing questions about Macron’s finances and wondered why Big Media were giving him a pass.

On March 2, Le Monde reported that the Belgian newspaper Le Soir stated that Macron:

was financed ‘more than 30%’ by ‘the kingdom of Saudi Arabia’.

However, Le Monde stated, there was a problem. The allegation came from lesoir.info, not lesoir.be. Lesoir.be is the real link to the genuine Le Soir. Therefore, the Saudi story was fake news.

The rest of this post documents highlights in the #EmmanuelCahuzac timeline from the beginning — March 14 — through May 5, before the 44-hour media blackout.

This is to demonstrate that American alternative media journalists have very little to do with Macron. They came in at the end. A lot of information had already been circulating in France and Belgium before then. That also means Hillary Clinton should stop braying about Russian hacking.

Important articles are also included, indicated by green arrows.

Translation and emphases mine throughout, unless otherwise indicated.

Mar 14: This is the first #EmmanuelCahuzac tweet asking what happened to Macron’s millions:

=> => The Challenges article, also from March 14, says that the French anti-corruption organisation, Anticor, had contacted the Haute AutoritĂ© pour la Transparence de la Vie Publique (HATVP) — High Authority for Transparency in Public Life — regarding Macron’s financial situation. Anticor stated that there appears to be a ‘lack of coherence between revenue and declared holdings’. Le Parisien broke the story on March 13.

=> => On March 16, Macron signed a nine-page financial disclosure form for the HATVP.

=> => On March 22, Les Crises said that the March 16 HATVP disclosure of Macron’s finances answered some of their questions, particularly regarding his recent book sales. That said, Les Crises pointed out that several of their questions concerning Macron’s financial situation remained unanswered.

=> => On March 24, MĂ©diapart published an article, ‘Luxembourg, the preferred tax haven for those close to Macron’. They do not mention family, only close associates.

=> => On April 3, Entreprise.news asked what exactly happened to Macron’s earnings from Rothschild during his employment there:

More than three million euros in salary and bonuses over three and a half years.

The author states:

it is often the practice in large international investment banks to pay these bonuses in Luxembourg investment fund shares, for example: nothing is illegal, but it may be wise to turn them into pseudo work on the family homePeople like Macron in France are constantly sailing close to the wind, very close to insider behavior, and would certainly be worried if we were in the Anglo-Saxon world or if the influence of large institutions were not so dominant in our country.

As for François Fillon, the conservative candidate and former prime minister who was dogged by alleged financial scandals from the beginning of the year because Macron never could have beaten him otherwise, the article says:

By the way, François Fillon: you are a small player with your mini-scandal. The technocratic government has known for a long time how to reconcile the moral postures of champagne socialists with an inextinguishable thirst for easy money without the citizens realizing it.

=> => On April 10, an article in Contrepoints states that, based on the aforementioned Enterprise.news article, the conservative think tank IREF has contacted the public prosecutor’s department regarding a declaration of Macron’s assets, one which raises many questions. Contrepoints shows the IREF’s request in full, then explains:

The analysis here is essentially technical and shows that, if Emmanuel Macron really invested €500,000 in work on his wife’s house, he could not account for the transactions he presented in his declaration of assets …

Does this mean that Emmanuel Macron has deliberately sought to defraud? Probably not in the sense that some understand it, that is, with the premeditation worthy of a great, money-grubbing mafioso. On the other hand, it is more plausible that Emmanuel Macron found a convenient way to escape tax by exploiting a loophole, the risk of which he did not properly assess at the time.

For the big institutions, however, the zeal shown against Les RĂ©publicains [Fillon] and the Front National, as well as the passivity towards a presidential candidate who appears in many respects as a man of the the establishment becomes a real problem, the importance of which cannot be underestimated, especially if Macron were to qualify for the second round.

=> => On April 14, the aforementioned think tank IREF elaborated on their reasons why they wanted Macron’s finances investigated. Their article poses 15 questions which, they state, have not yet been answered. They conclude (emphasis in the original):

These elements [of the story] cannot be dismissed out of hand. Mr Macron must explain himself without delay or the judicial authorities will get involved. Transparency in public life must be applied with equal rigour to everyone.

=> => Also on April 14, a MĂ©diapart reader posted an article on the readers’ site, Club MĂ©diapart, which proved explosive, creating a firestorm of media reaction. Essentially, it asked if Emmanuel Macron was a new Cahuzac. (I will address it in a future post.) MĂ©diapart‘s editor Edwy PlĂ©nel had to tell the media that the views expressed on Club MĂ©diapart have nothing whatsoever to do with MĂ©diapart‘s editorial line. That said, despite numerous requests to take the article down, PlĂ©nel refused, saying it did not violate any of their terms and conditions. Note the aforementioned real-deal MĂ©diapart article from March 24.

April 16: the constant accusations against François Fillon and his family actually began attracting undecided voters before the first round of voting on Sunday, April 23. RMC (talk radio) received calls and heard from their guests that he and his family were being dragged through the mud. None of it seemed right, especially when no one was looking at Macron’s finances. A Twitter user complained about coverage on RMC’s sister channel, BFMTV:

On April 17, the JDD (also see their aforementioned article from February 18) reported on Macron’s interview with Jean-Jacques Bourdin on BFMTV, wherein the candidate — now president — called speculation on his finances fausses nouvelles —  ‘fake news’. Already talk was circulating about an offshore account. The JDD reported:

“People said, ‘There has been some trickery,'” said the former business banker, who wanted to cut short the rumours about a possible “hidden account” in a tax haven: Totally false. “

He also told Bourdin something incredible:

In six years, I earned €3mAt the end, I had €270,000 in savings.

=> => Following the BFMTV interview on April 17, Marianne posted an article that afternoon warning that Macron should be more forthcoming in his answers:

In any event, his declarations du jour will have to be addressed at some point, because the candidate of En Marche does not keep any documents in the public domain or available to journalists, which would make it possible to confirm his statements.

April 17: A Belgian researcher put together a brief slideshow showing how many fake Twitter accounts had been created using @MĂ©diapart, after the aforementioned Club MĂ©diapart editorial of April 14 — which, again, has nothing to do with the magazine’s editors or editorial line. The Belgian thinks the new Twitter accounts are bogus. It could be that those were Club MĂ©diapart members who wanted to contribute to #EmmanuelCahuzac. This researcher, by the way, was the one who implicated Jack Posobiec in another anti-Macron hashtag. The only problem with that argument is that Posobiec created his Twitter account in 2012:

=> => Also on April 17, the Huffington Post (French edition) tied all these strands together and said that Macron was behind the curve if he thought that his aforementioned BFMTV interview would clear the air. The online chatter had already started with #EmmanuelCahuzac, the Club Medipart editorial and Nicolas Vanderbiest’s findings on supposed fake Twitter accounts.

April 17: Someone says that Macron’s stepchildren (he has no children of his own) have Swiss bank accounts (fric is slang for ‘money’) and that there is something not right about the house renovation:

April 21: L’Express deleted an article published on this date:

May 3: At this point, the English-language articles began circulating, the first being from ZeroHedge, which discussed the Disobedient Media investigation into an alleged Limited Liability Company (LLC) in Nevis called La Providence, after the Jesuit school Macron attended in Amiens.

May 4: Le Monde reported that, during the presidential debate the previous evening, Marine Le Pen told Macron:

Be careful in what you say, Mr Macron. I hope we won’t learn anything in the coming days … I hope we won’t find out you have a hidden account in the Bahamas.

I recall reading an American tweet at the weekend: ‘It’s not in the Bahamas. It’s in the Caymans.’

May 5: A French Twitter user found the Got News article that Posobiec referenced in his video of May 5. She asks whether BFMTV was economical with the truth regarding documents linked to a possible offshore account of Macron’s:

May 5: Police seized a Frenchman’s banderole, which had writing equating Macron with Cahuzac, and held him for questioning for two hours.

May 5: Lara.Poutou saw Jack Posobiec’s tweet on 4chan data dump. La toile means ‘the web’:

That was nearly the final tweet on #emmanuelcahuzac.

In conclusion, the French had far more to do with questioning Emmanuel Macron’s finances than the American alternative media did.

The only thing that might have really riled Macron up was their pursuit of an alleged offshore account.

WikiLeaks is investigating the authenticity of the 4chan /pol/ data dump.

There’s more good news for alternative media.

On April 3, 2017 Rebel Media hired former political operative Jack Posobiec as their Washington Bureau Chief.

In 2016, Posobiec (pron. ‘Posobik’), his Twitter feed and YouTube videos were popular with Trump supporters, especially Millennials.

Posobiec describes his career as follows:

Last year, I served as the Special Projects Director for Citizens for Trump, the largest Trump grassroots organization in the US.

Originally from the Philadelphia area, I’ve worked for four presidential campaigns, as well as numerous candidates for Senate, Congress, and Governor.

I’m also a US Navy veteran with multiple deployments overseas. 

Posobiec’s Rebel Media work can be found here.

He’s a good reporter. He speaks clearly, concisely and logically.

The video below from Monday, April 3, 2017 was his one of his first reports for Rebel Media. He explains the surveillance scandal involving President Donald Trump and others during the 2016 campaign season. He includes video clips from a variety of Big Media sources and lays out the timeline well:

The Rebel Media was founded in Canada in 2015 by a former Sun News Network host, Ezra Levant. Rebel’s hosts and commentators are controversial but highly popular among Millennials. Canadian Gavin McInnes is the best known in the United States.

The Rebel Media — also known as The Rebel — is an organisation that one either loves or loathes. That said, their programmes will make one think.

Contrary to the way it has been portrayed by Big Media in Western countries, The Rebel is not ‘far-right’ but libertarian-to-conservative alternative media.

Jack Posobiec and Rebel Media unintentionally broke out of their US-Canada market during the weekend of the French election. Now they’ve gone international.

In short, contributors to the /pol/ forum board on 4chan obtained a huge volume of data that supposedly relates to France’s new president, Emmanuel Macron. Macron threatened to sue anyone who discussed these data online during the 44-hour media blackout of the election prior to Sunday, May 7 — the second, and final, round of voting.

Disobedient Media, by investigative citizen journalist William Craddick, reported on the data dump between Wednesday, May 3 and Friday, May 5: here, here, here and here.

Posobiec posted the video below at The Rebel on Friday, May 5, referencing Craddick’s work. Posobiec said that he himself had just been labelled by a Belgian researcher as a Russian agent. Posobiec is a Polish name. This person alleges that Posobiec’s Twitter account appeared in a list of what were brand new Twitter accounts, thought to be bots. The researcher was already hard at work establishing notional bots on April 15. (N.B.: Posobiec opened his Twitter account in 2012.)

Posobiec went on to say that he spoke with 4chan members who said that they found the Macron documents on ‘the deep web’ — the dark net. Posobiec also cited a May 4 article on Got News by an independent auditor for the Big Three accounting firms who examined the data dump. ‘Jessica Gomez’ (not her real name) claimed that the documents are not fake and that the French people should be able to examine them prior to Sunday, May 7:

That weekend, someone on social media suggested that there should be a place on Twitter to discuss the data dump. Posobiec was the first to post at  #MacronLeaks.

Macron has since taken legal action against him and/or Rebel Media.

On Monday, May 8, Posobiec gave Alex Jones an interview in which he said that Rebel Media had their lawyers on the case. He was confident and composed.

My post tomorrow will address a) the speculation about Macron’s finances and b) much worse hashtags — #MacronCahuzac and #EmmanuelCahuzac — both of which started in France months ago. I will look at the latter hashtag  tomorrow.

The Cahuzac affair was the worst financial scandal to take place in France in recent years. It involved tax fraud and money laundering. In the end, Dr JĂ©rĂ´me Cahuzac — a surgeon who became a  parliamentarian then Junior Minister for the Budget in François Hollande’s administration — was sentenced to three years in prison on December 8, 2016. He is also ineligible to serve in public office for five years.

The name Cahuzac has been toxic since his scandal first came to light in 2013. 

Therefore, it’s interesting that Macron would take legal action against an American alternative media reporter when so much information — including the Cahuzac tag — was already circulating in investigative French media outlets.

To be clear: linking Cahuzac’s name with Macron is not saying Macron was involved, but rather the possibility that whatever might be uncovered about Macron’s finances could be as huge as the Cahuzac affair.

I wish Jack Posobiec — and his fiancĂ©e Tanya Tay — all the best, especially in the Macron dust-up, and hope that he continues to hold the centre ground in his coverage.

UPDATE: Thank you, Jack, for the tweet. Much appreciated!

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