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In case anyone missed them, here are Parts 1, 2, 3 and 4 of this series about the British public’s suspicion over the continuing coronavirus lockdown.

The June protests vexed Britons who were trying to do the right thing: staying at home and social distancing when outdoors.

All of a sudden, that flew out the window. Protesters had pride of place, yet, the rest of us still had to obey the social distancing guidelines.

That rankled, especially as we had been told we were selfish because we wanted to hug our loved ones who didn’t live with us. Think of grandparents and grandchildren.

What about people who just needed to get outdoors in the fresh air by themselves?

What about children who longed to see their friends? This former barrister and co-editor of Conservative Woman nails it:

And what about the people who freaked out over a very limited reopening of schools on Monday, June 1?

What about the average law-abiding person?

Yes, those people are ‘the problem’. We are made to feel guilty through no fault of our own.

The frustrating hypocrisy of it all:

Then we had Piers Morgan taking issue with Boris’s top adviser for trying to care for his little boy and with Labour MP Barry Gardiner for attending the demonstrations. Yet, Piers applauded his own son for taking part in the protests:

But I digress.

There was no social distancing during the protests. In fact, some police officers in London were assaulted.

However, even though Health Secretary Matt Hancock advised that the rules be kept in place over the weekend of June 6 and 7:

… the lack of social distancing was acceptable:

It was for a cause.

Health ‘experts’ said so — 1,200 of them, in fact:

Tucker Carlson had an excellent editorial on this on Friday, June 5. Anyone complaining about social distancing and protests is ‘the problem’, not the protesters and rioters. Well worth a watch. You could not make this up:

But what about the people told to leave London parks because they were sunbathing by themselves? What about Piers Corbyn who was arrested twice for advocating against lockdown? Where were the Metropolitan Police during the protests? On hand, but either taking a knee or standing by doing nothing:

Boris didn’t do anything, either. We have a Home Secretary. He could have got in touch with her.

This is what he issued on Saturday, June 6, the day of yet another protest in London over an American who died on home soil in Minneapolis, Minnesota:

‘The evils of fascism’. Don’t make me laugh, Prime Minister.

Things were no better in Northern Ireland …

… or Scotland, where thousands were expected to attend a protest on Glasgow Green:

The Labour leader, Sir Keir Starmer, was a bit slow on the riots. Didn’t he know that American cities were being destroyed and shops across the country looted? President Trump never stopped peaceful assembly:

Anyway, there is some good news in all of this. More people in the public eye have noticed that continuing lockdown in the UK is a bad idea:

Unfortunately, a number of ‘senior figures’ from the NHS do not see it that way, primarily because of the close proximity of protesters in early June. That is not the fault of the British public and is likely to make them even angrier. They were not among the protesters. They are eager to get back to work.

In fact, said ‘senior figures’ will probably make the British public all the more suspicious about the protests. Were they timed to prevent lifting of lockdown? We’ll never know.

In any event, this concludes this series with a few key points to keep in mind:

It’s going to be a long, hot, tense summer here in the UK.

See Parts 1 and 2 of this series before reading more about Britain’s silent majority who are angry about lockdown.

At present, here we are, unable to shop, get our hair cut and must still practice two-metre social distancing. Masks are optional except on public transport:

Whether we are old or young, we are treated like dirt:

And what if this coronavirus were dirt, rather than a virus?

If that is true — and I’m not saying it is — what then?

It couldn’t be, could it? After all, the First Minister of Northern Ireland, the DUP’s Arlene Foster, has briefed the Queen on COVID-19:

But what about all the deaths in care homes and the lives lost?

What about people’s businesses going to ground?

Thank goodness for the government’s generous furlough, but …

And what about travel?

This is going to be dire:

No more on board delicious dining for you:

What if you cannot reasonably travel with a face covering?

What about everything else in life?

Who wants to live like that?

This is turning the apolitical into political activists:

Is this ever going to end?

If so, how?

Perhaps it is a giant reset.

After all, we are told this is (shudder) the ‘new normal’:

The ‘new normal’ could be green:

Didn’t we all enjoy the bluer skies on those sunny May days? We could keep them. ‘Fewer holidays for you’, the government could say:

One does have to wonder about government advisors from the public sector:

These people do not encounter the everyday man or woman. They live in their own scientific, misanthropic bubble.

They do not care what happens to us. After all, they have a guaranteed salaries and gold-plated pensions.

To be continued next week.

Before I get to coronavirus and the economy, here’s a clip from Season 22 of The Simpsons. I read elsewhere that this was about the zika virus outbreak, but it hasn’t aged a day. This is worth a watch for a laugh and for its uncanny accuracy:

Interesting, because:

It seems that humans can pass coronavirus to cats, but not vice versa.

I found that Simpsons clip in the replies to Newsmax’s John Cardillo’s tweet, which is bang on the button:

The same goes for every other nation doing a shutdown.

Coronavirus strategies adopted in most other countries — those with lockdowns — will prove fatal:

Everyone talking about ‘wartime’ and ‘we must do our part’ really needs to have the following graphic put in front of them for eight hours a day. Those idiots, especially among our notional betters, should be forced to memorise it:

Please pay special attention to the abortion number.

Then revisit the COVID-19 figure.

Even a healthcare worker agrees the shutdowns are harmful:

So does someone at ‘high risk’:

More here:

It’s no wonder that people with two synapses rubbing together suspect that a) something is amiss or b) underfoot:

I’m disappointed in Donald Trump. I’m disappointed in Boris Johnson. As for other world leaders, I’m not surprised they plumped for a shutdown.

I don’t often agree with Lord Sumption, but he nails it here:

This is what we’re looking at with regard to shutdown length:

This is what Market-Ticker‘s Karl Denninger has to say on the matter:

He’s got a set of coronavirus figures that he explains. I won’t go into them here, but I do highly recommend you read them.

He concludes (all emphases in the original):

That’s 50 days, approximately, or roughly two months.  In other words, roughly what they’re talking about doing, right?

(For the pedantic folks that’s not exact because there is some repression from already-infected in both of those sequences — but not a statistically significant amount, and it’s a lot easier to follow without it.)

What did we get?  15 days (three viral infection cycles) worth of not doing it.

What do you think happens when you relax the lockdowns? R0 goes back to what it was because there’s still no herd immunity.

The shutdowns will have been useless in eradicating coronavirus:

You have to get the last case in the entire country and isolate it.  You also have to prevent anyone from anywhere in the world from coming back in and re-infecting your population.  Which you can’t and won’t.  Only twice in the history of mankind has actual eradication been accomplished — one of which was smallpox, and that one came about by forced vaccination.  Smallpox was fatal about 30% of the time, there were many outbreaks before the vaccine was developed and while there were quarantines and forced isolation events actually preventing more outbreaks repeatedly failed until that vaccine became available and herd immunity was achieved.

Oh, and for comparison, smallpox had an R0 not too far removed from this virus — best estimates are that it was around 3.5 …

The premise that somehow “flattening the curve” means the total number of people will get this virus will be smaller is a lie.

There are exactly three ways that happens: 1) The virus is hard enough to get and easy enough to identify before contagion, which is what happened with SARS and made it possible to contain it; 2) There is a vaccine and thus we can use that to obtain herd immunity to suppress the effective R0 below 1.0 or; 3) Enough people get the virus that R0 is suppressed via natural herd immunity.

That’s it.

If you suppress a virus with these measures you do not change this fact.  You only change timing, and in addition you take all the economic and social damage from those mitigation measures.  You do not change the total number of infections and, where medical interventions in the most-severe cases are ineffective 85-90% of the time, you also don’t change outcomes either.

On April 3, Denninger covered the economic outlook. Be afraid, be very afraid:

Folks, there’s now way to sugarcoat this: 30% of small businesses are gone.  They will never reopen.  We are not only destroying their cash flow the incessant prattle of fear has turned people against the premise of ever setting foot in a place where you may be within 6′ of another person — ever again.

If we do not stop that right now you could reopen every single bar and restaurant and they would have no customers.  It doesn’t matter whether the sign reads “open” or “closed” if nobody comes through the door to spend money.  Loans, forgiven or not, do exactly nothing if there are no customers.

This threatens to be a problem that will not go away for a generation.  When the Depression came through it altered behavior for nearly 50 years.  This isn’t that bad yet but it will end up that way if we don’t cut this crap out right now.

Not in a month, not in three weeks, not at some indeterminate point when some model says it’s ok, now.

Further, the collapse in health care I warned we were at risk of seeing is going to occur if we don’t cut this crap out.  There will be little or no warning when that comes; a demand spike into collapsing employment in the sector, and thus no people to take care of you means you will die if you have an ordinary heart attack.

The only recourse — even though we’re already in economic trouble — is to reopen for business:

Next month is going to print 10+ million jobs lost  The internals in this jobs report say it might print as high as 20 million.  It will break every record.  The only way to stop it is to reopen the economy right now and take whatever mitigating steps we can for those who are at high risk, which we know are identified — they are the deadly co-factors in the NY death data.  Specifically, those who have Diabetes, Lung Disease, Cancer, Immunodeficiency, Heart Disease, Hypertension, Asthma, Kidney Disease or Liver Disease, either singly or in combination, should self-isolate and not live with anyone who isn’t willing to do so with them.  That means your groceries and such are ordered for pickup, you drive to the WalMart or wherever and the bags get loaded in the trunk, then you go back home.

Those people may also choose to take their chances and use HCQ as a prophylaxis.  It may work and it may not.  Some people cannot do so because of other drugs that interact badly with it, but the dose required for prophylaxis is likely similar to that for malaria, which is a once-a-week pill.  Will that stop all high-risk people from getting it and potentially dying?  Nope.  In fact it might not help much at all.  Some people will be forced off it by side effects.  We don’t know.  But it’s the best we have and the best we’re going to have in the next few weeks, so you fight the war with the army you’ve got.  We cannot sit locked down for even another three to four weeks, and you know that claims is a lie; there’s no date being given, the Administration already lied once and tripled its original claimed time while some governors have even issued orders all the way out into June already.

We now have governors, mayors and others that are literally placing people under house arrest — more than 3/4 of the nation’s population is under such orders and some, including in Kentucky, are literally putting ankle bracelets on ordinary citizens to compel compliance.  Walton County in Florida just banned families from sitting in their yard on property they own.

This is not theoretical any more.  It is not a “inconvenience.”  It has destroyed consumer confidence and if we don’t cut it out now it will destroy a huge percentage of economic activity on a permanent basis.  You cannot fix this by handing people “money” that we do not have; more debt is the last thing this nation and its citizens need.

By June the economy will be a smoking hole in the ground from which we will not recover.  We will have so-ingrained people with fear that it will not matter what you do or when you do it.  That fear will last years, even decades and we absolutely must not have that happen.

Period.

We must keep people out of the hospitals that are high risk.  We cannot, as a society and economy, accept the path being put forward by people on the Gates’ Foundations board and their models.  Their models, which are the predicate for every single one of the shutdowns thus far have already proved wrong in the case of NY; they claimed the city would need far more hospital beds and ICU beds than on this day are actually required.  In fact they’re so far off they’re laughable yet all the so-called “experts” are still setting policy with those models.  Remember, NY is the worst thus far in the US and yet the models predicted that by now it would be three times worse than it actually is.  There has only been an 0.4-0.5 change in transmission rates (from ~2.7-2.2) and that is consistent, within a tenth, between NY and nationally as a whole.

I understand the fear — it’s palpable — this is a sniper attack; you can’t see him but he can kill you without warning.

I get it.  It’s why snipers scare the living hell out of people; a guy shooting at you who you can see is still scary, but much less-so than a gunshot that comes out of nowhere.

We must overcome the fear; we must stare it down and power through it.  We have no choice.

I fully agree. I always opposed the shutdowns, for economic and libertarian reasons in equal measure.

The statisticians advising our world leaders are dangerous characters. I’m rewording Mario Puzo’s quote about a lawyer with a briefcase to say (emphasis mine):

A statistician with a spreadsheet can steal more than a thousand men with guns.

Who will make the first move to save the global economy? Donald Trump? (I think Boris Johnson will wait and see what the United States does.)

Please, President Trump, reopen for business by the end of April.

One year after President Trump put more stringent immigration controls in place along the southern US border, the number of migrants has been dropping.

On January 6, 2020, Issues & Insights (I&I) reported (emphases mine):

Last week, 18 people crossed the border illegally into Arizona hoping they could exploit a loophole in U.S. asylum policy to stay in the country. Instead, they found themselves shipped back to Mexico while their asylum claims are reviewed

The 18 migrants were sent back to Mexico thanks to a policy President Donald Trump implemented that goes by the official name of “Migrant Protection Protocols” (MPP), but more colloquially known as “Remain in Mexico.” First adopted a year ago, the administration has been working with Mexico to steadily expand it. The Nogales port of entry south of Tucson, Arizona, where the 18 were sent, is the site seventh to be included.

Before this policy went into effect, illegal immigrant families knew that if they crossed the border and claimed asylum, they’d effectively get a free pass. Immigration officials would release them into the U.S. within 20 days, on the promise that they would show up for their court date months in the future. Few bother to return. This policy was dubbed “Catch and Release” for a reason.

Now, they must wait in Mexico while immigration judges review their cases.

This has happened without the ‘wall’ (generally, a tall steel and cement-reinforced fence) in place, although that will be built, too.

Results have been incredible:

The number of apprehensions at the southwest border plummeted from 144,000 in May 2019 to just 42,649 in November – the last month for which the government has data. The number of families caught crossing illegally went from 84,486 in May to a mere 9,000 in November.

As the El Paso Times put it, “the policy has proved to be a virtual wall.”

The article, citing the Wall Street Journal, says that successes have occurred elsewhere, too:

Border crossings plummeted in most other areas of the border over the same period.

The I&I article says that the Trump administration has used a multi-pronged approach to border control, including international co-operation and tighter asylum application rules:

Last July, the administration issued a rule denying asylum to anyone who crossed another country before getting to the U.S. border if they didn’t seek asylum in that country first. This policy directly attacks the migrant caravans traversing Mexico. The administration has also struck deals with Central American countries that let the U.S. return asylum seekers to Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador.

The administration has tightened up what counts as a “credible fear” claim for asylum seekers. At one detention facility, the number passing the credible fear claim plunged from 97% to just 10%.

Trump’s threat to impose stiff tariffs on Mexico unless it got serious about border control also made a huge difference, with Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador suddenly sending troops to detain migrants.

Also:

A Government Accountability Office report released in December found that arrests climbed 34% from 2015 to 2018, detentions went up 35%, and removals rose 13%.

Who benefits from these changes?

Americans who have been shut out of the job market:

As we noted in this space recently, it’s been Americans who’ve gained work filling jobs that would have been taken by illegals.

In August 2019, ICE removed many illegals from Mississippi who were working at chicken processing factories. Americans applied for the jobs in droves, as Breitbart reported on August 13:

Roughly 150 locals attended an August 12 job fair to apply for jobs at the Koch Foods’ plants in Mississippi.

The fair was run after the August 7 removal of 243 alleged illegal migrants in two of the company’s chicken processing plants, according to local authorities.

Neil Monro’s article for Breitbart notes that Americans earn more once illegal workers are removed from employment:

… wages have spiked upwards for Americans when employers were forced to give up their illegal workforces.

Black employment also improves when illegals are no longer working. This welcome development will boost the American president’s favourability further, as the following tweet and replies to it indicate (click on original tweet to read more):

President Trump is doing the right thing.

I was unsure about his ‘wall’ idea in 2016, but, living overseas, had no idea how bad the southern border problem was.

As is so often said about him, ‘Promises made. Promises kept.’

What a relief for the American people: a president who truly does have their interests at heart.

This is my last post on British politics before the December 12 election.

I have already written about Labour and the Liberal Democrats.

Like the Britons in the video below, 17.4 million of us would like to finally see Brexit delivered so that we can move on to trade negotiations with the EU and the world at large. Only one person can lead Parliament to bring this to fruition — Prime Minister Boris Johnson:

Voters have confidence in his leadership thus far (130 days and counting):

Contrary to the misinformation the media have been ramming down our throats, many British voters would be perfectly happy with a no deal or a Boris Brexit:

Although Labour have been promising households in Britain everything except a free puppy, the harsh reality would mean more — and higher — taxes for nearly everyone, ‘the many, not the few’, to borrow their slogan:

The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) calls Labour’s spending plans ‘colossal’! Venezuela, here we come:

Labour’s proposed higher corporation tax would not only stifle innovation but consumer prices would go up in order to compensate for those taxes:

However, under the Conservatives — even with Parliament’s prolonging Brexit uncertainty — Britain has record employment and buoyant wages:

Our currency recently rallied, too. The Boris effect?

The Leader of the House is entirely correct in his assessment of the Prime Minister’s support of free enterprise:

Those worried about the NHS should keep in mind that a healthy economy promotes a healthy population.

Since November 6, Conservatives have been campaigning across the country.

The Prime Minister has made several campaign stops every day to factories, schools and hospitals. In November, he visited his constituency of Uxbridge and South Ruislip in west London with his father Stanley, a television celebrity in his own right:

Last week, he made another stop in London: Grodzinski’s bakery in Golders Green. The video of Boris piping ‘Get Brexit Done’ on doughnuts is subtitled. This must be the friendliest and most heart-warming video of the campaign for any party:

Another Conservative of note is Jacob Rees-Mogg, most recently Leader of the House, and current incumbent candidate for North East Somerset:

His sister, Annunziata, is one of four Brexit Party MEPs who, last week, urged voters to back the Conservatives:

Rees-Mogg has been campaigning in North East Somerset since Parliament was dissolved in November. It is a delightful part of England, even when cooler temperatures and rain dominate the landscape:

There is always room for humour in a political campaign. For those unfamiliar with British English, ‘moggy’ is slang for ‘cat’:

This is my favourite photo, and it is hard to disagree with the reply:

Conclusion

Only a majority Conservative government can break the Brexit logjam by the time of our next deadline:

Once post-Brexit trade negotiations start in earnest during the transition period, MPs can then begin to focus on what matters to the British:

Are these sensible policies important to you?

While our other political parties, especially the Scottish National Party (SNP), want to break up the Union which has held strong since 1707, the Conservatives will continue to hold it together, because:

On Thursday, December 12, a Conservative vote makes sense:

I’m borrowing this GIF to say …

Back Boris.

Jamie Oliver presents himself as a man of the people, although he does come across as being holier than thou.

Yet, the reality is a bit different.

On May 21, 2019, he made headlines as his restaurant chain went into administration. One thousand jobs are at risk.

On May 22, the BBC reported that staff were less than pleased with the way his managers terminated their employment in Glasgow (emphases mine):

… staff at Jamie’s were still hopeful that a turnaround was on the horizon.

“We knew it wasn’t doing as well as we’d want it to be,” says Lucy, who worked at the Glasgow branch for more than three years.

Staff, she says, were led to believe that a refit was around the corner, and that taps offering Brewdog beer would soon be installed.

Instead, they got a simple email.

“My partner was meant to be on shift this morning,” says Lucy, who asked for her real name not to be used.

“He was told at the last minute not to come in as the locks were being changed.

“We were then invited to join a conference call and told we had all been made redundant, effective immediately.”

Lucy and her partner, who worked at Jamie’s for five years, say they feel there was a lack of transparency at the firm.

“I wish they hadn’t said to us that it was fine, when it obviously wasn’t,” she says.

Oliver says his restaurants were ‘effectively franchises’, meaning that he was not involved with their day to day running. Even so, I am surprised he did not insist that the franchise holders show truth and compassion in informing employees of their situation.

In his documentaries, Oliver has been very critical of people and politicians who do not do right by the ordinary citizen. I thought he would practise what he preaches. Apparently not.

Oliver’s restaurants are not the only British restaurant chain in trouble. Many others are.

I am amazed when I go into London and see shopfront after shopfront occupied by these chains. It isn’t at all sustainable.

There was a time three years ago when we were at the top of the worldwide restaurant boom. No longer.

The aforementioned BBC article says:

Once seen as competitors to Jamie’s, Italian chain Strada is down to just three branches, while Carluccio’s has been forced to close approximately a third of its restaurants, after losing tens of millions of pounds.

Burger brand Byron, French cuisine chain Cafe Rouge, and pizza outlet Prezzo aren’t faring much better.

Lucy says the writing is on the wall for restaurant chains:

The market for chain restaurants is dying – there are loads of places you can go in Glasgow that are cheaper.

That’s great news, because I prefer eating at family-owned restaurants. London used to have a lot, but rising rates and leases put many out of business.

Family-owned establishments often try harder. Their lives depend on it.

Comments temporarily off

Lou Dobbs of Fox Business thinks that President Trump is abandoning the America First policy upon which he campaigned in 2016.

Lou was referring to Trump’s Workforce Policy Advisory Board meeting held on Wednesday, March 6, 2019.

Before I get to Lou’s segment on this, aired the same day, here is a White House transcript and a bit of background about the event, which was open to the media.

Ivanka Trump is heading this council, working with commerce secretary Wilbur Ross and the heads of seven US corporations along with other organisations, such as the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and think tanks such as the Milken Institute.

Now that the US unemployment rate is so low historically, it would appear that it is time to import more foreign workers. Really?

This is what President Trump had to say, in part (emphases mine):

… we want to have a very strong border, but we’re going to have a lot of people coming in. A lot of people don’t understand that. They think we’re shutting it out. We’re not shutting it out. We want people to come in, but they have to come in through a process. So we have a process that’s really moving along rapidly. Last year, we took in a large number of highly qualified, wonderful people. And they’re — for the most part, they’re working already in your companies

So we’re going to let a lot of people come in because we need workers. We have to have workers. Unemployment at 3.7, 3.6, probably. These are low numbers. And, in one way, I love it. But, in another way, I don’t want to make it hard for you to get those companies rolling with really great people. Because without the great people, it doesn’t work. All of these wonderful things we talk about are nice, but you need the great — as you discussed, Juanita, you need the people and you need really good people. And we have great people. And we have the best in the world, in my opinion. And we are having other people come into our country that you’re going to be very proud of and the job they do

And, later:

Q Mr. President, how much more immigration would you like to see in this (inaudible)?

THE PRESIDENT: Well, we’re going to have a lot of people coming into the country. We want a lot of people coming in. And we need it. It’s not a question of do we want it. These folks are going to have to, sort of, not expand too much. And if you tell them — these are very ambitious people around this table. They don’t like the concept of not expanding. Would you say that’s right, Barbara? Barbara is not into non-expansion.

So we want to have the companies grow. And the only way they’re going to grow is if we give them the workers. And the only way we’re going to have the workers is to do exactly what we’re doing.

On the one hand, President Trump is reiterating what he said on the 2016 campaign trail about immigrants coming in through a system of vetting.

On the other hand, the US has had that for years with the H-1B visas for specialist workers, such as those in high tech.

For many Americans, Trump’s Workforce panel will be pursuing immigration as usual.

When will American adults ever catch up to be able to get those high tech jobs? Once again, it looks as if they are being passed over for foreign workers. Is it because foreign workers will do those jobs for a little bit less?

It is no wonder that hard hitting Lou Dobbs gave his thoughts in a measured, logical way:

Here are relevant soundbites:

Lou concludes by urging Americans to contact their Congressional representatives — and the White House — about this errant policy that will surely reverse the record-breaking employment efforts made during the first two years of the Trump presidency.

If the White House persists with this policy, it will be returning to business as usual with the Swamp alive and well for decades to come.

Election day is nearing and the Dems continue to pump out more untruths.

Before we get to those, rumour has it that Robert Mueller’s Russian collusion probe could end up being a damp squib:

Politico is left-of-centre, ergo not a Trump-supporting news site. Excerpts from their article follow, emphases mine:

That’s the word POLITICO got from defense lawyers working on the Russia probe and more than 15 former government officials with investigation experience spanning Watergate to the 2016 election case. The public, they say, shouldn’t expect a comprehensive and presidency-wrecking account of Kremlin meddling and alleged obstruction of justice by Trump — not to mention an explanation of the myriad subplots that have bedeviled lawmakers, journalists and amateur Mueller sleuths.

Perhaps most unsatisfying: Mueller’s findings may never even see the light of day.

“That’s just the way this works,” said John Q. Barrett, a former associate counsel who worked under independent counsel Lawrence Walsh during the Reagan-era investigation into secret U.S. arms sales to Iran. “Mueller is a criminal investigator. He’s not government oversight, and he’s not a historian” …

For starters, Mueller isn’t operating under the same ground rules as past high-profile government probes, including the Reagan-era investigation into Iranian arms sale and whether President Bill Clinton lied during a deposition about his extramarital affair with a White House intern. Those examinations worked under the guidelines of a post-Watergate law that expired in 1999 that required investigators to submit findings to Congress if they found impeachable offenses, a mandate that led to Starr’s salacious report that upended Clinton’s second term.

Mueller’s reporting mandate is much different. He must notify his Justice Department supervisor — currently Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein — on his budgeting needs and all “significant events” made by his office, including indictments, guilty pleas and subpoenas.

When Mueller is finished, he must turn in a “confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions” — essentially why he chose to bring charges against some people but not others. His reasoning, according to veterans of such investigations, could be as simple as “there wasn’t enough evidence” to support a winning court case.

Then, it will be up to DOJ leaders to make the politically turbo-charged decision of whether to make Mueller’s report public.

Government officials will first get a chance to scrub the special counsel’s findings for classified details, though, involving everything from foreign intelligence sources to information gleaned during grand jury testimony that the law forbids the government from disclosing.

They’ll also have to weigh the input from a number of powerful outside forces

Now on to the Democrats.

Not a lot of people know that Trump is more popular now than Obama was at this point in 2010, the year of his first mid-term:

Why do Democrats vote against middle class interests?

Why do they keep saying Trump is racist?

Why do they lie about Republican plans for health insurance?

Excerpts from Dr McCaughey’s New York Post article follow:

Across the country, Democratic ads are telling voters a big lie. Dems claim they’re protecting people with pre­existing medical conditions but Republicans would take that protection away. The idea is that ObamaCare is the only way to safeguard people with preexisting conditions. That’s false, and the outcome of the midterm elections could turn on this falsehood.

A super PAC allied with Sen. Chuck Schumer is behind many of these ads, including one targeting Republican Josh Hawley, who’s in a tight race with Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill. If he’s elected, the ad claims, millions of Missourians could lose their protections. In another ad, McCaskill tells the camera “Two years ago, I beat breast cancer,” then says her opponent would do away with protections for preexisting conditions like cancer.

These ads blatantly mislead voters. Hawley’s on the record insisting that health-reform legislation must include these protections.

So is Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who has called on his state lawmakers to enact protections. But never mind the truth. The Democratic Governors Association is funding an ad with a breast-cancer patient saying she won’t be able to afford lifesaving treatments if Walker is reelected.

She says that Republicans in general are partly to blame for not explaining their position properly.

Here is the problem with Obamacare. I mention this specifically for my overseas readers who think it operates like the NHS. It doesn’t:

ObamaCare isn’t the only way to protect people with preexisting conditions. Just the most unfair way. It compels insurers to charge the healthy and the sick the same price. That’s the major reason ObamaCare premiums for 2019 are triple what they were in 2013 …

Right now, the middle class, who are ineligible for a subsidy, are getting priced out of ObamaCare. They’re hoping to enroll in so-called short-term plans that offer fewer benefits (no inpatient mental-health care, for example) and low prices. The Trump administration recently relaxed insurance regulations to help sticker-shocked consumers buy these plans.

Yet last Friday seven advocacy groups, such as the American Psychiatric Association, sued to stop these plans and slam closed this escape hatch from ObamaCare. The litigants said the plans would “draw low-risk people out of” ObamaCare. That’s exactly the point. People want choices and lower premiums.

She says a federal insurance-fallback program would address the issue. In the meantime, the Dems are perpetrating untruths:

Let voters choose based on real issues, not a phony one.

And, finally, there are the human ‘caravans’ coming in from Latin America via Mexico. The Left is organising these, just as they organised the one in June:

On that topic:

Mexico’s efforts during the week of October 15 looked good to begin with, but were ineffectual. Trump was understandably unhappy — especially with the Democrats:

So …

The Mexican president had addressed the country two days before, announcing that the government’s response would continue to be strong (possibly thanks to the American secretary of state Mike Pompeo):

Spanish-speakers might be interested in reading the supportive replies he received from his fellow Mexicans. They do not want these human caravans, either.

Regardless of what Dems and the media say — ‘Think of the children!’ — this is manufactured chaos involving a lot of clean, well-fed young men …

… who hate not only President Trump but also the United States:

The left-wing media are peddling false sob stories. They’re only on foot for photo ops:

This is the truth of the matter:

A reporter from the LA Times is in Mexico. She saw first hand that these people don’t care about law or order …

… or borders (‘We are humans’, ‘No one is illegal’):

And, who else could be among them?

I hope this Leftist — Democrat — chaos fails dismally, especially at the ballot box on November 6.

Texas

Robert O’Rourke — ‘Beto’ (pron. ‘Bay-toh’) — is running against incumbent Ted Cruz for the US Senate.

James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas was able to penetrate his campaign office and obtain jaw-dropping information. This is brand new, made around Halloween and posted online on November 1:

This is 23 minutes well spent:

The Project Veritas report says, in part:

Project Veritas Action Fund has released undercover video from current Congressman and US Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke’s campaign. The video exposes how his campaign staff appear to be illegally using campaign resources to buy supplies and help transport Honduran aliens. This is the eighth undercover video report Project Veritas has released in a series revealing secrets and lies from political campaigns in 2018.

Said James O’Keefe, founder and president of Project Veritas Action:

“Charity and helping your fellow man are things we applaud at Project Veritas Action.  The problem is, you can’t break the law when you do it.”

A Project Veritas Action attorney reviewed the footage and assessed:

“The material Project Veritas Action Fund captured shows campaign workers covering up the true nature of spending of campaign funds and intentionally misreporting them. This violates the FEC’s rules against personal use and misreporting. It also violates Section 1001, making a false statement to the federal government. The FEC violations impose civil penalties, including fines of up to $10,000 or 200 percent of the funds involved. Violations of Section 1001 are criminal and include imprisonment of up to five years.”

The campaign found out that a group of Honduran illegals are already in the US and are stopping on their way to Missouri to be sheltered by a church. Sean Hannity has more dialogue from the video (emphases mine):

“You know that migrant caravan? A few of them got here already and they’re dropping them off like really close,” said a campaign field manager. “I’m going to get some food right now and some stuff to drop off.”

“Don’t ever repeat this stuff but like, if we just say we’re buying some food for an event, like Halloween events,” suggested another staffer.

“That’s not a horrible idea, but I didn’t hear anything,” said the manager. “I think we can use that with [prepaid campaign debit cards] to buy some food, all that sh*t can be totally masked.”

But, didn’t Dems say they weren’t going to help the illegals?

James O’Keefe followed up with Beto’s campaign manager and posted the following video on November 2:

Earlier that day Beto got an endorsement from Obama’s CIA director. Hmm:

O’Keefe has alerted the local newspaper:

Other media outlets have ignored the story, too:

I hope that any readers in Texas will circulate these videos this weekend. Apparently, this Sunday — the final before mid-terms — is when a lot of churchgoers vote.

Thank you in advance.

More Americans were able to treat themselves to steak on Labor Day, Monday, September 3.

On Friday, August 31, Bloomberg reported there was a ‘bull run’, putting poultry processors in the shade (emphases mine):

A buzzing economy and low U.S. unemployment is a boon for beef, typically considered a premium meat. Gains for the cattle herd means retail prices have fallen. Combine that with grocer discounts for the holiday, and steaks and burgers could be the cheapest they’ve been in years, attracting demand.

Meanwhile, other meats are in the doldrums. There are record supplies of chicken and pork in the U.S., and even with prices at multiyear lows, it’s more than most people care to eat. Companies including Tyson Foods Inc. and Sanderson Farms Inc. have recently said that bargains on beef were hurting poultry.

“Margins for retailers are great, and consumers are back into beef now that prices are better,” said Will Sawyer, an economist at Greenwood Village, Colorado-based CoBank. “Chicken, which had been the recession special for so long, is having to take a back seat to the more pricey protein.”

Americans are hungry for burgers and steaks partly because they’ve been deprived. A drought caused ranchers to reduce herds to a six-decade low in 2014, and beef prices shot up to an all-time high. The meat was so expensive it forced consumers to cut back, with consumption declining to the lowest since the 1970s. Now, even with cheaper prices and bigger supplies, demand still hasn’t bounced back to where it was before the recession, Sawyer said. That means there’s still plenty of room for increased buying.

Beef consumption will rise 1.4 percent this year to 57.7 pounds on a per-capita basis, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said this month. Demand will grow to 58.7 pounds next year, the agency estimates.

President Trump tweeted about the ongoing prosperity during his administration:

He also tweeted about the state of the nation:

Job numbers have continued to rise in 2018, creating various national records:

By June, thanks to President Trump, the US had its lowest unemployment rate in recorded American history!

On August 5, the Gateway Pundit reported that nearly 25% of all US jobs created in the 21st century can be credited to President Trump.

Every American can work now

especially minorities:

Also, young people are being hired like never before — well, at least since 1966:

Tax cuts are helping, too:

Candidate Trump campaigned on job creation in 2016, proclaiming:

I’ll be the greatest jobs president God ever created.

Promises made, promises kept!

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