You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Nunes FISA memo’ tag.

Last week, I wrote ‘Senate Intelligence Committee: “no direct evidence of conspiracy between Trump campaign and Russia”‘.

On Sunday, former FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe appeared for a half-hour on CBS’s 60 Minutes in an interview with Scott Pelley.

McCabe is currently doing a book tour to promote The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump.

On March 16, 2018, President Trump tweeted:

Two weeks earlier, Fox News reported that the Department of Justice’s Inspector General (IG), Michael Horowitz, was expected to (emphases mine):

criticize former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe for approving a leak of information about the Hillary Clinton investigation to The Wall Street JournalThe New York Times reported late Thursday.

According to the Times, which cited four people familiar with the investigation into the department’s handling of the Clinton probe, McCabe will be censured for disclosing the investigation’s existence to the Journal.

The Journal report in question, which was published Oct. 30, 2016, recounts a conversation in which McCabe sparred with a senior Justice Department official over an investigation into the Clinton Foundation. The Journal — which cited sources including “one person close to Mr. McCabe” — said McCabe insisted that the FBI should move forward with its investigation, while the Justice Department official expressed concern about its potential effect on the presidential election.

McCabe, a frequent target of President Donald Trump’s ire, left his position as FBI deputy director in January and is scheduled to retire later this month. He had served for several months as acting director following Trump’s firing last May of FBI Director James Comey.

Spokespeople for the Justice Department, the FBI and the inspector general had no immediate comment on the report Thursday evening …

Trump verbally attacked McCabe during the campaign and again as president because McCabe’s wife, during a failed state Senate run, had accepted campaign contributions from the political action committee of then-Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, a close Clinton ally.

David J Harris Jr and Real Clear Politics have more detail, dating from January 2018.

On March 14, a Fox producer for DoJ news tweeted:

On March 15, the Washington Examiner reported that McCabe was ‘still holding on to his retirement’:

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe is holding onto his pension just days before he is set to officially retire.

McCabe was at the Justice Department to meet with Scott Schools, the most senior career attorney in the department, as well as other officials, for a majority of the afternoon Thursday, to make a case why he should be allowed to retire and not be fired.

Schools reports to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who in turn reports to Attorney General Jeff Sessions. The decision to fire McCabe before Sunday, and thus strip McCabe of his full pension and benefits, is in Sessions’ hands.

The_Donald featured a fiery thread in response:

So, This Lying, Leaking, Lawless LOSER Is Pleading To The DOJ Today To Keep His Pension? WE, The Taxpaying Citizens Demand This CRIMINAL Receive NOTHING And Be INDICTED For His CRIMES!!

Then, the next day:

CBS News, in reporting McCabe’s meeting the previous Friday pointed out:

If McCabe is fired, it is believed his only avenue of appeal would be to file a lawsuit to try to reclaim his pension.

Twitter exploded.

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-California) was indignant:

So was the former CIA director, directing his ire at President Trump:

Later that day, McCabe issued a lengthy statement (click on image to see it in full, also available at CNN):

His statement elicited this response:

. McCabe, you disgraced the oath you swore. You harmed the nation by your deceit. You took 1/2 million dollars for your wife’s campaign from Hillary’s guy, McAuliffe, the said you should be FIRED. You deserve it.

McCabe’s lawyer also issued a statement. (Apparently, his lawyer — a former Inspector General for the DoJ — supported the current Inspector General’s report until McCabe was implicated by it.)

The DoJ disagreed with McCabe and his lawyer:

I hope that FBI Director Christopher Wray received all of McCabe’s documentation about the 2016 election.

There were also newsy snippets:

On March 17, The Hill, among other media outlets, noted that McCabe’s weekend statement seemed to contradict James Comey’s testimony from May 2017 about relaying sensitive information to the media.

News emerged that McCabe wrote memoranda of his conversations with President Trump and gave those to Robert Mueller. CBS reported that details of James Comey’s firing were included.

Fox News correspondent Adam Housely said that McCabe’s dismissal was a morale boost to FBI agents.

On March 18, TownHall posted an editorial, ‘The Coming Collusion Bloodbath’. Nearly one year on, we could be at that point:

That Comey, McCabe, and others have practiced an obvious double standard in the email case of Hillary Clinton where ample evidence caused 106 of the case agents and attorneys working on the case to believe indictment would occur, and simultaneously going to such extraordinary measures through the assistance of essentially Hillary’s campaign operation to attempt to thwart the outcome of the election is more than enough reason to go after them on a criminal basis alone.

That McCabe reportedly lied to the low key Inspector General, while attempting to send General Michael Flynn to prison for lying to the same FBI is of highest hypocrisy.

Before McCabe was fired, Reddit had censored discussions about his ‘corruption issues’. Now that he was gone, they could be discussed freely once more.

Attention then turned to the McCabe’s connections with Hillary Clinton. A New York radio host tweeted:

The following 2017 video resurfaced. It shows that McCabe had (still has?) a home in Chappaqua, New York, where the Clintons live (start at 5:00 in):

On April 13, Inspector General Horowitz issued his report:

Fox News explained:

The report, handed over to Congress on Friday and obtained by Fox News, looked at a leak to The Wall Street Journal about an FBI probe of the Clinton Foundation.

The report says that McCabe authorized the leak and then misled investigators about it, leaking in a way that did not fall under a “public interest” exception.

[W]e concluded that McCabe’s decision to confirm the existence of the CF investigation through an anonymously sourced quote, recounting the content of a phone call with a senior department official in a manner designed to advance his personal interests at the expense of department leadership, was clearly not within the public interest exception,” the report says …

Sessions said that McCabe “made an unauthorized disclosure to the news media and lacked candor − including under oath − on multiple occasions.”

James Gagliano, a retired FBI supervisory special agent said that, according to the IG’s report, firing McCabe was the right thing to do. He says that whether you are a Marine or a special agent of the FBI, the same rules apply:

In May, FBI agents wanted to be subpoenaed in order to testify against Comey and McCabe:

Questions arose in Congress. The Gateway Pundit reported that Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) wanted answers about the FBI’s treatment of General Flynn.

Early in June:

Allegations arose about McCabe’s involvement in the 302s (FBI reports) regarding General Flynn:

On September 6, the Washington Post reported that a grand jury had been investigating McCabe ‘for months’:

an indication the probe into whether he misled officials exploring his role in a controversial media disclosure has intensified, two people familiar with the matter said.

The grand jury has summoned more than one witness, the people said, and the case is ongoing. The people declined to identify those who had been called to testify.

The presence of the grand jury shows prosecutors are treating the matter seriously, locking in the accounts of witnesses who might later have to testify at a trial. But such panels are sometimes used only as investigative tools, and it remains unclear if McCabe will ultimately be charged.

A spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in D.C., which has been handling the probe, declined to comment.

Michael Bromwich, a lawyer for McCabe, said in a statement after this report was published online that he had been confident McCabe would not be charged, absent “inappropriate pressure from high levels of the Administration.”

“Unfortunately, such pressure has continued, with the President targeting Mr. McCabe in numerous additional tweets,” Bromwich said. The lawyer also raised questions about the timing of the news report on the grand jury.

ZeroHedge had more (emphases in the original):

Specifically, McCabe was fired for lying about authorizing an F.B.I. spokesman and attorney to tell Devlin Barrett of the Wall St. Journal – just days before the 2016 election, that the FBI had not put the brakes on a separate investigation into the Clinton Foundation, at a time in which McCabe was coming under fire for his wife taking a $467,500 campaign contribution from Clinton proxy pal, Terry McAuliffe. 

In order to deal with his legal woes, McCabe set up a GoFundMe “legal defense fund” which stopped accepting donations, after support for the fired bureaucrat took in over half a million dollars – roughly $100,000 more than his wife’s campaign took from McAuliffe as McCabe’s office was investigating Clinton and her infamous charities.

On September 17, Trump tweeted about the two FBI employees who were part of the group working against his presidency:

On September 18, the Gateway Pundit reported on the press release for McCabe’s upcoming book, The Threat, mentioned above. The press release quoted McCabe as saying (emphases mine):

I wrote this book because the president’s attacks on me symbolize his destructive effect on the country as a whole. He is undermining America’s safety and security, and eroding public confidence in its institutions. His attacks on the most crucial institutions of government, and on the professionals who serve within them, should make every American stand up and take notice.

On September 21 came the first mention of reports that Rod Rosenstein offered to wear or joked about ‘wearing a wire’ for a meeting with Trump:

A few weeks earlier, President Trump had intended to declassify various unredacted documents. By September 22, he had backtracked. The DoJ advised him that declassification could harm the Mueller probe. In addition, US allies warned against declassification for security reasons. Trump instructed IG Horowitz to review them instead. Had Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein any influence on Trump on this subject? Declassification would have been a huge risk for Rosenstein — and McCabe.

On September 27, the then-House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HSPCI) Chairman Devin Nunes (R-California) said that he planned to release testimony from 70 or more witnesses who were interviewed in the HSPCI’s own Trump-Russia probe. The Daily Caller reported:

Nunes said that between 70 and 80 percent of the transcripts do not contain classified information. The remaining transcripts would have to be reviewed by the office of the director of national intelligence. Nunes said that review process “would only take a matter of days.”

Nunes and other House Republicans have also led a push to get President Donald Trump to declassify and release documents related to the FBI and Justice Department’s collusion investigation.

It also transpired that McCabe and Rosenstein were feuding via the media. McCabe represented the faction that wanted to end Trump’s presidency. Rosenstein represented the people currently at the DoJ and FBI.

Rosenstein was using the Washington Post to get his story out. McCabe was using the New York Times.

One example of this was when the Rosenstein-wear-a-wire story appeared in The New York Times:

On October 9, The Hill‘s John Solomon reported that Rosenstein was desperate to downplay the story. However, released testimony from former FBI lawyer James Baker indicated that this was no joke:

Baker’s story lays bare an extraordinary conversation in which at least some senior FBI officials thought it within their purview to try to capture the president on tape and then go to the president’s own Cabinet secretaries, hoping to persuade the senior leaders of the administration to remove the president from power.

Even more extraordinary is the timing of such discussions: They occurred, according to Baker’s account, in the window around the firing of FBI Director James Comey. Could it be that the leaders of a wounded, stunned FBI were seeking retribution for their boss’s firing with a secret recording operation?

I doubt this is the power that Congress intended to be exercised when it created the FBI a century ago, or the circumstances in which the authors of the 25th Amendment imagined a president’s removal could be engineered.

This wasn’t a president who was incapacitated at the time. He was fully exercising his powers — but in a way the FBI leadership did not like.

And that makes the FBI’s involvement in the tape-record-then-dump-Trump conversations overtly political — even if Rosenstein believed the whole idea was farcical.

Also:

Keep in mind, this is the same FBI that, a few months earlier during the 2016 election, had its top counterintelligence agent Peter Strzok talking to Page — his lover and the top lawyer to McCabe — about using their official powers to “stop” Trump in the election and having an “insurance policy” against the GOP nominee. That insurance policy increasingly looks like an unverified dossier created by British intelligence operative Christopher Steele — a Trump hater himself — that was bought and paid for by the Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign through their mutual law firm.

You walk away from the Baker interview with little doubt that the FBI leadership in that 2016-17 time frame saw itself as far more than a neutral investigative agency but actually as a force to stop Trump’s election before it happened and then maybe reversing it after the election was over,” said a source directly familiar with the congressional investigation.

The following day, the Washington Post published an article outlining the tension between McCabe and Rosenstein. The FBI higher-ups did not like that Rosenstein had recommended in writing that President Trump fire James Comey. DoJ officials did not like that the FBI, McCabe in particular, opened an investigation on Trump immediately after Comey’s departure. WaPo reported that the two quarrelled shortly after Robert Mueller was appointed — in front of him.

Rosenstein, incidentally, had allegedly already made his ‘wear a wire’ comment.

The subject of the meeting in question was whether Rosenstein or McCabe should recuse themselves from involvement in the Mueller probe:

Rosenstein wanted McCabe out of the Russia probe, and McCabe felt differently, arguing that it was the deputy attorney general, not the head of the FBI, who should step away from the case.

Although neither recused himself:

The McCabe-Rosenstein relationship has only worsened with time …

The Rosenstein-McCabe relationship has come under renewed scrutiny as lawmakers have demanded answers about memos written by McCabe and his then-senior counsel, FBI lawyer Lisa Page, about the discussions on May 16, 2017, in which McCabe wrote that Rosenstein suggested recording the president and discussed the 25th Amendment.

Rosenstein was due to meet that week with The House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees about the DoJ, but the meeting never happened.

On October 11, the Washington Examiner reported that the FBI was delaying publication of McCabe’s book, The Threat. It would not appear until February 2019:

McCabe was fired by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in March, less than 48 hours before his retirement day because of “allegations of misconduct” found by the Justice Department’s Office of the Inspector General. McCabe, has disputed the IG report, and is now the subject of a grand jury inquiry.

According to the FBI’s employment agreement, all disclosure of information must be reviewed and adhere to the FBI’s “Prepublication Review Policy Guide,” made official in 2015.

Although there is more to cover on McCabe, this is a good point at which to bring us to the present day.

On Monday, February 18, 2019, President Trump pulled no punches:

Is this the first time President Trump has tweeted the letters ‘t-r-e-a-s-o-n’?

Here’s ‘treason’ again:

Trump was on fire:

We can only hope that the tables start turning soon.

Perhaps the new attorney general, Bill Barr, will set things in motion.

This week, President Donald Trump tweeted his frustration with the slow pace of the investigations going on at the DOJ and FBI.

Robert Mueller’s investigation is moving at an expected — incredibly, slow — pace. Before Christmas, a Trump spokesperson said it would be wrapped up early in 2018. So far, in ten months, all that Mueller has done is indict 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities. On February 17, 2018, CNN reported (emphases mine):

Special counsel Robert Mueller has indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities for allegedly meddling in the 2016 presidential election, charging them with conspiracy to defraud the United States, the Department of Justice announced Friday.

In addition, three defendants were charged with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud, and five defendants with aggravated identity theft …

The sweeping indictment describes in detail an unprecedented campaign by Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election, affirming the longstanding conclusions of the US intelligence community. It is at odds with President Donald Trump’s repeated questioning of those conclusions, which has continued throughout his first year in office. CNN reported this week that Trump is still not convinced that Russia meddled in the election.

Trump emphasized the lack of allegations of any impact on the presidential election

Beginning as early as 2014, the Russian organization Internet Research Agency began operations to interfere with the US political system, including the 2016 elections, according to the indictment.

The defendants allegedly posed as US persons, created false US personas and operated social media pages and groups designed to attract US audiences, the indictment reads. Two of the Russians also allegedly traveled to the United States in 2014 to gather intelligence for their operations …

The indictment mentions a February 2016 memo to Internet Research Agency staff telling them to post political content on US social media sites and “use any opportunity to criticize Hillary and the rest (except Sanders and Trump — we support them).” The reference to Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent who challenged Clinton for the Democratic nomination, shows that the Russian government decided early on to oppose Clinton.

Twelve of the 13 defendants charged worked for the Internet Research Agency.

[Deputy Attorney General Rod] Rosenstein said Friday that the indictment does not contain any allegations that any Americans knowingly participated in the activity.

Then, the Democrats issued their FISA memo in response to the February 2 FISA memo from Representative Devin Nunes (R-California), chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI). Representative Adam Schiff (D-California), who also serves on the HPSCI, issued the memo. On Saturday, February 24, Fox News reported:

President Trump on Saturday dismissed a Democratic rebuttal to the GOP memo outlining government surveillance abuses in the 2016 campaign as a “total political and legal bust,” claiming that it only confirms the ”terrible things” that were done by the nation’s intelligence agencies.

The rebuttal, written by Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee, concluded that officials at the FBI and Justice Department “did not abuse the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) process, omit material information, or subvert this vital tool to spy on the Trump campaign” …

The rebuttal added that the DOJ only made “narrow use” of information from [Christopher] Steele’s sources and that in later FISA renewals the DOJ provided “additional information obtained through multiple independent sources” that backed up Steele’s reporting. It challenged the Republican assertion that the FBI authorized payment to Steele, saying that it neglected that the payment was canceled.

The new memo also asserted that the dossier had been corroborated by multiple sources. However, in June 2017 testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee, former FBI Director James Comey said the opposite — that three months after the warrant on [Carter] Page had been granted he still considered the dossier “unverified” and “salacious” when he briefed incoming President Trump in January 2017 at Trump Tower

And upon the new memo’s release, Republicans on the intel committee responded with rebuttals to the rebuttal, providing more evidence that this battle has legs. For instance, while the Democrats say that the court was given information about the political motivations of Steele, Republicans say that such a statement is “buried in a footnote” that obscures rather than clarifies his motives.

“The American people now clearly understand that the FBI used political dirt paid for by the Democratic Party to spy on an American citizen from the Republican Party,” Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif. said in a statement …

The White House called the rebuttal a “politically driven document” that fails to answer the concerns raised by the Republican memo.

Democrats have claimed that the original Republican memo was an effort to attack FBI Director Robert Mueller’s investigation into alleged Russian interference in 2016. Trump had previously said that the memo “totally vindicates” him in the investigation.

Talk about a parallel universe. This is going to run and run.

Now on to Trump’s tweets.

The first two are retweets from his interview with Judge Jeanine Pirro on Saturday, February 24:

The next has to do with a clip from Fox News’s Catherine Herridge:

Trump included a quote from her and his comment:

Trump then watched other Fox News shows and pulled quotes:

Much of this is AG Jeff Sessions’s fault. Outside of MS-13 arrests and drug busts, Sessions’s recusal from any investigation into the campaign’s alleged — false — Russian collusion brought in Robert Mueller and his team which has taken Sessions out of his position of authority. Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein is, in effect, running the DOJ.

Even worse, an article from October 2017 points to the very real possibility that — even without Mueller’s investigation — Jeff Sessions was not going to investigate Hillary Clinton’s or the Obama administration’s wrongdoings.

Last September and again on October 28, former congressman (R – Utah) Jason Chaffetz spoke with Judge Jeanine about a conversation he had with Jeff Sessions. The Gateway Pundit reported on the shocking content from both interviews (bold emphases in the original, those in purple mine):

When asked whether Jeff Sessions should be out, Chaffetz correctly responded, “Well I don’t know what the case is to keep him!”

A month ago Chaffetz was on with Judge Janine and he then dropped his first bombshell on Sessions:

Chaffetz: I can tell you that while I was in Congress and the Chairman of the Oversight Committee, I did go over and visit with Attorney General Sessions and it was one of the most frustrating discussions I had because whether it was the IRS, Fast and Furious, the email scandal that we went through, I did not see the Attorney General willing to just let Lady Justice administer justice and then follow through. I understood maybe the last six months of the Obama Administration…

Judge Janine: Wait a minute I don’t have that much time. You spoke with Sessions on IRS, Fast and Furious. Did he give you a reason? Did he say he was presenting anything to a grand jury? Yes or no?

Chaffetz: No, he basically let me know he wasn’t going to pursue anything on the major cases.

Judge Janine: So IRS, on the major cases? Are we talking about Hillary Clinton, because I haven’t even gotten to her yet.

Chaffetz: Yes, the email scandal of Hillary Clinton. We had Bryan Pagliano. I issued a subpoena for him to appear before the Committee and he said “No”. He didn’t even show up. We issued another subpoena. The US Marshals served it. And you know in my world, if you’re in court, I guarantee you that a subpoena is not an optional activity. We wanted the Attorney General to prosecute him and he said “No”.

Pagliano maintained Hillary’s private server when she was Secretary of State and, before that, managed the IT for her failed 2008 campaign.

The Gateway Pundit article concludes:

Sessions’ actions as AG are the opposite of what a decent AG would do if he was seeking justice.  Sessions is compromised and as a result he is no better than Obama’s corrupt and criminal AG’s Holder and Lynch.  Sessions is now the biggest snake in the swamp.  Nothing gets done and nobody gets investigated, prosecuted or punished for criminal deeds because of Sessions.

Sessions is the SWAMP! He must go!

Supposedly, the DOJ’s inspector general (IG) Michael Horowitz is scheduled to issue a report this month about his own investigation into the department and the FBI. It is now thought that it could appear in April.

Regarding the IG’s report, on Wednesday, February 28, the Washington Examiner covered the tweet from Trump supporter Jerry Falwell Jr, president of Liberty University (emphasis mine):

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. suggested Wednesday that Attorney General Jeff Sessions might be a “coward,” after President Trump attacked Sessions for not moving convincingly enough to investigate abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act under former President Barack Obama …

Falwell tweeted after Trump asked why Sessions has … the Justice Department’s Office of Inspector General to examine FISA abuse, instead of the department’s own lawyers. Trump said the IG route will “take forever,” and said the IG has no power to act if it finds wrongdoing. Sessions later tweeted that he was using the “appropriate process.”

(Sigh.)

All being well, the public outcry from Trump’s supporters will be such that Sessions will get the message that he should stand down. The only problem is that there is no one Trump can easily move laterally into that spot. That is the only way a replacement could work, since the Senate told Trump last year they would not approve another AG.

This post is part of a series about expected news items in 2018. Readers who have not seen the first two posts might find them of interest:

Part 1: hate in Washington DC

Part 2: Hillary WAS supposed to win (The 16 Year Plan to Destroy America)

Part 3: FBI’s missing texts

Part 4: ‘secret society’ and more on missing FBI texts

Today’s post is related to all of the above. It concerns the release of the Devin Nunes FISA memo on February 2, 2018.

Representative Devin Nunes (R-California) is the chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI).

His four-page memo concerns FISA warrants allowing surveillance of President Donald Trump and several others.

Democrats and media want one-party state

Before going into the content of the memo, what everyone around the world heard this weekend on media outlets has been an onslaught of anti-Republican and anti-Trump thought.

This is because — as I said in Part 2 — Donald Trump was patently not supposed to have won the 2016 election:

A firestorm of protests and objections to Trump ran from the day after the election to the present. Even former attorney general Loretta Lynch got involved early in 2017:

The blurb for the video reads:

The Obama administration’s former Attorney General Loretta Lynch has made an impassioned video plea for more “blood” and “death” on the streets – a video that was later posted on the Facebook page of Senate Democrats as “words of inspiration.”

There are some big players behind the move for the one-party state, and many people who ally themselves with the Democrats have been persuaded that this is for the common good. However, based on this memo — and the Democrats’ clear disdain for the American people as seen at the State of the Union address — that might not play out:

Tucker Carlson (Fox News) interviewed Representative Eric Swalwell (D-California) the evening of the memo’s release. Swalwell suggested that Carlson, in defending the memo’s release, was doing Vladimir Putin’s work. Absurd:

The Nunes — FISA — memo

The Nunes — or FISA — memo is four pages long and has no footnotes. A two-page letter from the White House states the president approves of its release. Both are on Scribd and PDF.

Here is a big picture overview of the background to the memo (courtesy of The_Donald):

This image from 8chan has additional information, equally important:

Tom Fitton from Judicial Watch describes the scenario in a nutshell:

This graphic is helpful in understanding what happened when:

Also involved is a man named Carter Page, who was briefly and peripherally involved with the Trump campaign. He was the gateway for the surveillance. Anyone he spoke to on the campaign was automatically surveilled.

The Federalist has a short, concise summary of what is in the memo. Excerpts follow from ‘The 7 Biggest Bombshells In The House Intel Memo On FISA Abuses’, emphases mine outside of the headings:

1. FBI Used News Articled Sourced By Steele To Corroborate His Dossier

The memo, which President Trump agreed to declassify Friday, states that the FBI did not tell the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) a lot of crucial information about the dossier it was citing as evidence when the bureau sought a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant to monitor Page.

In September 2016, ex-British spy Christopher Steele–who compiled an infamous dossier filled with unfounded claims about President Trump–told Yahoo News about Page’s visit to Moscow. Yahoo News subsequently published a story about this trip. The FBI then cited this Yahoo News report, sourced entirely by Steele, as evidence in its initial FISA warrant application to corroborate information the ex-British spy compiled in his dossier. The FBI incorrectly asserted to the court in its application that Steele did not provide information to Yahoo News about Page’s Moscow trip. British court filings, however, show Steele admitted he met with Yahoo News in September 2016, two months before the FBI got its initial warrant, to discuss the trip at the direction of Fusion GPS.

Think of it — using a Yahoo News article to obtain a FISA warrant. You could not make this up. The journalist who wrote the article is stunned:

2. FBI Knew Steele Was Being Paid By DNC, Hillary Clinton, Chose Not To Tell The Court

The FBI did not tell the court that information cited in its warrant application was gathered by an individual who was being paid by Trump’s political opponents.

The bureau was aware that Steele was working for Fusion GPS, a research firm that was hired by Perkins Coie, a law firm Hillary Clinton and the DNC were making payments to. The DNC and Clinton campaign paid Steele $160,000 …

In December 2017 FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe Steele testified that if the dossier hadn’t existed, the FBI would not have sought a warrant (Bombshell 3).

4. FBI Spied On Trump’s Associate For Nearly a Year

The FBI obtained the initial FISA warrant to surveil Page on October 21, 2016 after he visited Moscow and reportedly spoke to a Russian official who had expressed support for Trump in July 2016. The warrant was renewed three times for the full extent allowed of 90 days each, totaling 360 days under surveillance

With each of these renewals, the FBI choose not to disclose to the court that it had relied on information funded by Trump’s political opponents in its quest to surveil a Trump campaign member.

Signatories included then-FBI director James Comey, then-deputy director Andrew McCabe, then-deputy attorney general Sally Yates, then-acting-deputy attorney general Dana Boente, and deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein.

What this means is that Trump was under surveillance even after he became president:

Steele began playing up his role in the operation and gave an interview to David Corn of Mother Jones on October 30, 2016, only several days after the first FISA warrant was approved. The FBI dismissed him as an ongoing source, as he violated bureau protocol (Bombshell 5). However, the FBI never told FISC — the FISA court — when seeking warrant renewals (Bombshell 6).

7. DOJ Official’s Wife Was Getting Paid By Fusion GPS

Throughout the process of obtaining the initial warrant, then-Associate Deputy Attorney General Bruce Ohr’s wife worked for Fusion GPS, the firm that hired Steele to dig up dirt on Trump. At the firm, she helped conduct opposition research on Trump and his associates. The FBI did not disclose this to the court.

Ohr was demoted within the DOJ in December 2017 after it was discovered he had concealed meetings with Steele and Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson. During these meetings, Steele confided in Ohr that he was “desperate that Donald Trump not get elected.” The FBI knew about Steele’s political bias against Trump, but did not make this known to the court.

Why this matters — constitutional crisis?

Exposing this — what many Trump supporters knew or suspected — is a very big deal and could cause a constitutional crisis:

From The_Donald:

This congressman takes it even further:

Ultimately:

What’s coming soon

On February 2, Gateway Pundit reported that Senators Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) and Lindsay Graham (R-South Carolina) are busy attempting to get a Senate Judiciary Committee memo declassified.

The HPSCI will also vote to make supporting documents to the FISA memo discussed here available to the public.

Expected in March is the inspector general’s — Michael Horowitz’s — report which is likely to cover this and much more.

2018 will be quite the year for news. Stay tuned.

(Forbidden Bible Verses will appear on Sunday, February 4.)

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