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The American public’s patience with Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III is wearing thin.

Unlike some Trump supporters, I and many others see no sunny side to his being attorney general (AG) any longer.

For background material see my tag Jeff Sessions, including George True’s guest posts:

Guest post: a reader’s perspective on the Deep State and Mueller investigation (April 15, George True)

Guest post: a reader’s perspective on Jeff Sessions’s priorities (George True, April 20 and Rosenstein’s presidential cufflinks)

Guest post: what to make of Jeff Sessions, the DOJ and upcoming IG report? (May 17)

Politically blind Sessions supporters say that he would not be there if President Trump did not want him to be.

WRONG!

The Senate told Trump last year that a) they would not appoint another AG and b) they would not go into recess for the specific purpose of preventing Trump from appointing a replacement.

A lot of these same people said that HR McMaster was doing a wonderful job, too. For months on end, I read — paraphrased — ‘HR McMaster wouldn’t be there if the President didn’t want him to be’.

FALSE!

It took a while for Trump to sack McMaster, but once Trump built up a head of steam about the three-star general, that was it.

I have just completed a five-part series for Orphans of Liberty called the McMaster Chronicles. I would strongly suggest that Sessions fans read the series, which will take a while:

Trump’s reshuffle: the McMaster Chronicles — Part 1

Trump’s reshuffle: the McMaster Chronicles — Part 2

Trump’s reshuffle: the McMaster Chronicles — Part 3

Trump’s reshuffle: the McMaster Chronicles — Part 4

Trump’s reshuffle: the McMaster Chronicles — Part 5 (the end)

HR McMaster was a globalist from the start. He refused to call out Islamicist terrorism because, to him, religious people do not commit it. He tried to get President Trump not to use the term but failed. He renewed chief unmasker Susan Rice’s security clearance. He sacked Trump loyalists. He told a security conference in Berlin that there was Russian collusion.

That last point was the straw that broke the camel’s back. For months, I had been hoping McMaster would go, and, suddenly, all because of the brief mention of Russian interference in Berlin, that was it. Trump was furious.

And, no, McMaster did not resign. Trump arranged for John Bolton to replace him and then gave McMaster the news.

Trump also purposely used mainstream media reports as a rationale to replace McMaster. Those reports included the same ‘anonymous sources’ that McMaster and Sessions supporters so loathe.

I’m very sorry about McMaster’s father’s recent death (covered in Part 5), but the general was not the right person for the job.

The McMaster Chronicles illustrate what is highly likely to happen to Jeff Sessions.

And now, Joe diGenova, an attorney close to President Trump, says that Sessions’s days are numbered.

PJ Media has the May 16 story, excerpted below (emphases mine):

Attorney Joe diGenova predicted that both Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ days are numbered at the Department of Justice during a telephone interview with Newsmax’s Howie Carr Wednesday. DiGenova’s claim came after the New York Times published a report titled “Code Name Crossfire Hurricane: The Secret Origins of the Trump Investigation”. The report has been interpreted by many as an attempt by sources within the “Deep State” to cushion the blow of the imminent DOJ inspector general report, which is expected to be explosive.

In March, President Trump considered adding diGenova and his wife Victoria Toensing to his legal team, but conflicts of interest reportedly prevented him from hiring them. The attorney is still in contact with Trump, and told Carr that “the president has had it up to his scuppers with these clowns.”

Like a number of other concerned Trump supporters, diGenova is certain that a coup d’état has been underway for some time:

DiGenova explained that the whole point of the Comey/Clapper/Brennan operation was to ruin Trump’s presidential bid and if that failed, to ruin his presidency. He expressed frustration that Sessions has been unable to see through what he called “a coup d’etat.”

“If he can’t see that, he’s not competent to be attorney general!” he exclaimed. He hasn’t recused himself from understanding that a presidency is being assaulted illegitimately by Mueller and by current and former people in the FBI and the intelligence community.”

DiGenova warned that Sessions is on thin ice with the president and his days may be numbered. “If it comes out that Jeff Sessions has not authorized a grand jury into all those unmaskings, all those leaks, … and Ben Rhodes and John Brennan and James Clapper have not been authorized for subpoenas, … if he has not authorized that, he’s going to be fired,” he predicted.

The reason he knew that, DiGenova said, was that both Rosenstein and Sessions had been to the White House twice in the past two weeks to meet with White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, and they were told their jobs were “not secure.”

The president has had it up to his scuppers with these clowns and he has every right in the world to be furious with the incompetence of the Department of Justice under Rosenstein and Sessions,” diGenova explained, adding, “I have been told that by people who know.”

Under the current circumstances, Sessions could be replaced in one of two ways. Trump could make it so uncomfortable for him to remain as AG that he resigns. Alternatively, Trump could make a lateral move by sacking Sessions and putting the current EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) head Scott Pruitt into that position.

Vox, not a pro-Trump site by any means, had an article about the latter possibility on April 6. Excerpts follow:

The background is that Trump has been positively furious with Sessions since he recused himself from handling the Russia investigation in March 2017. The probe has since been overseen by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Robert Mueller to take charge of it in May …

But Sessions hasn’t taken the bait and has defiantly refused to quit …

Yet there is one alternative here — albeit a legally dubious and sure-to-be-controversial one. In his administration, Trump has frequently used a law called the Federal Vacancies Reform Act to circumvent the usual line of succession in agencies. The law allows the president to temporarily fill an agency vacancy so long as the new appointee was already confirmed by the Senate for a different position.

This is how Trump put Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney in charge of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and put a Defense Department official in charge of the Department of Veterans Affairs. (There is some legal ambiguity about whether Trump even can use the Vacancies Act to replace someone he fired rather than someone who resigned, but Trump decided to try to use it to replace fired VA Secretary David Shulkin anyway.)

Now, an appointment under the Vacancies Reform Act would be temporary — the appointee can only serve for 210 days. But a whole lot can happen in 210 days, at what seems to be a crucial period for Mueller’s investigation.

Even better news is that Scott Pruitt might well be interested in the AG job:

Politico’s Andrew Restuccia reported that Pruitt “has told friends and associates that he’s interested in becoming attorney general, according to three people familiar with the internal discussions.” (He added, “It’s unclear whether Pruitt would be on the shortlist for the position.”) Then, hours later, both Reuters and Bloomberg independently confirmed the report that Pruitt has been telling others he was interested in the attorney general job.

The sourcing and speedy corroborations from other outlets here suggest that Pruitt’s allies were deliberately putting out a message — to Trump. The message was that if Trump wanted to finally rid himself of Sessions, Pruitt would be positively eager to step in and replace him.

What Pruitt would do about the Mueller investigation is, of course, not explicitly stated in these reports, though the wink-wink implication seems to be that he’d handle it in a way Trump would prefer.

Vox also stated that moving Pruitt into the AG slot would also allay the concerns of conservatives wary of moving Sessions out.

To be fair, Vox did include the Trump tweets against ‘fake news’, but the article says this has happened before. It didn’t mention McMaster — Sarah Sanders came to his defence — but the same principle is in play.

Joe diGenova was nearly hired using this same Trump technique:

On March 11, he tweeted that he was “VERY happy” with his legal team and that a New York Times report that he’d add another lawyer was “false.” However, just eight days later, he announced he did in fact plan to hire another lawyer, Joseph diGenova, and a few days after that, his lead personal lawyer, John Dowd, exited the team. (DiGenova’s hiring fell through in the end.)

Furthermore, Trump has been known to float a great many possible personnel changes in conversations with friends and allies — a few of which end up happening, most of which don’t.

Scott Pruitt has not had an easy time at the EPA, which is filled with holdovers who are trying to make his life a misery whilst he is trying to reform the agency. That could work either for or against him in a lateral move.

Regardless …

Sessions is going to be out one way or another as soon as Trump can arrange it.

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In the first half of 2017, Trump supporters — myself included — were enthusiastic about Jefferson Beauregard Sessions as attorney general.

On February 10, I wrote about child molesters and traffickers:

Can Jeff Sessions make pizza great again?

Although perverts and traffickers are always being arrested, under Sessions’s watch, the number began to increase exponentially. Great news!

Another big problem was MS-13. On April 10, I posted:

Attorney General Sessions sends message to MS-13: ‘We will find you’

From those two targets, we see that Sessions’s DOJ was making a move on people all of us can agree fall into the category of criminal.

However, there is another type of criminal: Washington DC politicians who work against the interests of the United States and, within that group, the subset which has been trying to bring down President Donald Trump since November 9, 2016, the day after the election. George True’s guest post of April 15, 2018 explains how serious this is:

Guest post: a reader’s perspective on the Deep State and Mueller investigation

That Jeff Sessions does not consider the DC Swamp rats to be criminals is problematic.

My other 2018 posts about him have reflected this:

Trump tweets frustration with slow investigation (February 24 – 28, 2018)

Increasing outcry for Sleepy Sessions to go (April 19)

Guest post: a reader’s perspective on Jeff Sessions’s priorities (George True, April 20 and Rosenstein’s presidential cufflinks)

Jeff Sessions began recusing himself from Swamp rat investigations early in 2017.

As a result, he has made life extremely difficult for President Trump and his associates. The coup continues apace.

January 10, 2017 — first hint of recusal

As early as January 2017, Sessions said he would recuse himself from any campaign issues involving Hillary Clinton.

On January 10, the Los Angeles Times reported (emphases mine):

Sen. Jeff Sessions, Donald Trump’s pick to be the next attorney general, testified before Congress on Tuesday that he would recuse himself from any investigations and prosecutions involving Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Sessions and Trump called during the fall campaign for Clinton to be investigated and prosecuted for her use of a private email server, despite determinations by the FBI and Justice Department that her actions did not warrant charges. Since his election, Trump has said he did not support such an investigation or prosecution. 

Sessions said he had made comments during the “contentious” campaign about Clinton’s use of the email server and her family’s charitable foundation that could place his objectivity in question.

“I believe the proper thing for me to do would be to recuse myself from any questions involving those kind of investigations that involve Secretary Hillary Clinton,” the Alabama Republican told senators on the Judiciary Committee.

March 2, 2017 – first recusal statement

After Sessions was appointed attorney general, he formally recused himself from campaign investigations.

On March 2, he gave a statement, excerpted below:

During the course of the confirmation proceedings on my nomination to be Attorney General, I advised the Senate Judiciary Committee that ‘[i]f a specific matter arose where I believed my impartiality might reasonably be questioned, I would consult with Department ethics officials regarding the most appropriate way to proceed.’ 

During the course of the last several weeks, I have met with the relevant senior career Department officials to discuss whether I should recuse myself from any matters arising from the campaigns for President of the United States

Having concluded those meetings today, I have decided to recuse myself from any existing or future investigations of any matters related in any way to the campaigns for President of the United States

Quartz provided the background:

US attorney general Jeff Sessions, responding to mounting pressure from Democrats and from his own party, announced that he is recusing himself from any current or future investigations into the 2016 US presidential campaigns. The decision followed reports that he had spoken twice last year with Russia’s ambassador to the US. Russia, of course, is widely believed by US intelligence agencies to have meddled in the election.

Sessions, a former Republican senator and an advisor to US president Donald Trump during the race, had testified during his Senate confirmation hearing in January that he had not had communications with the Russians during the campaign. At his press conference today (March 2), Sessions spoke about one of the meetings, recalling that it ending in a tense confrontation about Ukraine.

Business Insider provided more detail:

The attorney general recused himself on March 2 after reports emerged that Sessions had twice met with the Russian ambassador to the US, Sergey Kislyak, during the course of the election, contradicting statements he made during his Senate confirmation hearing, in which he said under oath that he did not have contacts with Russians during the campaign

Following the bombshell report, Democrats swiftly demanded Sessions’ resignation, while a growing group of Republicans called on the attorney general to recuse himself from campaign-related investigations.

During questioning by Sen. Ron Wyden later in the hearing, Sessions said that there were no classified reasons for his recusal, as former FBI Director James Comey suggested in his Senate testimony last week. Sessions also claimed that he had informally recused himself since he was confirmed to lead the Justice Department. 

I basically recused myself the first day I got into the office because I never accessed files, I never learned the names of investigators, I never met with them, I never asked for any documentation,” Sessions told Wyden. “The documentation — what little I received — was mostly already in the media.” 

Months later, the Los Angeles Times noted:

In March, Sessions announced he was recusing himself from any investigation into charges that Russia meddled in the 2016 presidential election and potential collusion between Russians and Trump’s campaign. Following his announcement, reports surfaced that Trump was irate that Sessions had recused himself from any investigation.

Fake news or a grain of truth in that last sentence?

I’m writing up what happened to HR McMaster, which I will post here in due course, and found that these rumours and reports turned out to be true.

June 13, 2017 – second recusal statement

On June 13, 2017, the Los Angeles Times reported Sessions’s second formal recusal, this time into Russian collusion:

Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions insists his recusal from any investigation into Russian collusion in last year’s election was simple: It’s the law.

In an opening statement before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, Sessions cited a Department of Justice regulation that he said mandated him stepping aside …

“I recused myself not because of any asserted wrongdoing on my part during the campaign,” Sessions said. “But because a Department of Justice regulation, 28 CFR 45.2, required it.”

“That regulation states, in effect, that department employees should not participate in investigations of a campaign if they have served as a campaign advisor,” said Sessions.

Throughout much of the 2016 election, Sessions served as a senior advisor to Trump’s campaign.

July 2017 — a vexed Trump unloads

On July 19, three New York Times reporters — Peter Baker, Michael S Schmidt and Maggie Haberman — published an interview (and transcript) with President Trump at the White House.

Trump did not mince words. The article led with this:

WASHINGTON — President Trump said on Wednesday that he never would have appointed Attorney General Jeff Sessions had he known Mr. Sessions would recuse himself from overseeing the Russia investigation that has dogged his presidency, calling the decision “very unfair to the president.”

In a remarkable public break with one of his earliest political supporters, Mr. Trump complained that Mr. Sessions’s decision ultimately led to the appointment of a special counsel that should not have happened. “Sessions should have never recused himself, and if he was going to recuse himself, he should have told me before he took the job and I would have picked somebody else,” Mr. Trump said.

However, the topic did not come up until later in the interview. On this and other subjects, this has to be one of the best interviews ever. On Robert Mueller, Jeff Sessions and Rod Rosenstein, Trump had this to say:

SCHMIDT: What do you understand to be the four corners of what Mueller [Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel in the Russia investigation] can look at, if he steps—— [crosstalk]

TRUMP: I don’t know. Nobody has contacted me about anything.

_________

TRUMP: Because I have done nothing wrong. A special counsel should never have been appointed in this case.

BAKER: Can we put that on the record?

TRUMP: Because so far, the only — yeah, you can put it down.

SCHMIDT: Was that [Attorney General Jeff] Sessions’s mistake or [Deputy Attorney General Rod J.] Rosenstein’s mistake?

________

TRUMP: Look, Sessions gets the job. Right after he gets the job, he recuses himself.

BAKER: Was that a mistake?

TRUMP: Well, Sessions should have never recused himself, and if he was going to recuse himself, he should have told me before he took the job, and I would have picked somebody else.

HABERMAN: He gave you no heads up at all, in any sense?

TRUMP: Zero. So Jeff Sessions takes the job, gets into the job, recuses himself. I then have — which, frankly, I think is very unfair to the president. How do you take a job and then recuse yourself? If he would have recused himself before the job, I would have said, “Thanks, Jeff, but I can’t, you know, I’m not going to take you.” It’s extremely unfair, and that’s a mild word, to the president. So he recuses himself. I then end up with a second man, who’s a deputy.

HABERMAN: Rosenstein.

TRUMP: Who is he? And Jeff hardly knew. He’s from Baltimore.

________

TRUMP: Yeah, what Jeff Sessions did was he recused himself right after, right after he became attorney general. And I said, “Why didn’t you tell me this before?” I would have — then I said, “Who’s your deputy?” So his deputy he hardly knew, and that’s Rosenstein, Rod Rosenstein, who is from Baltimore. There are very few Republicans in Baltimore, if any. So, he’s from Baltimore. Now, he, we went through a lot of things. We were interviewing replacements at the F.B.I. Did you know Mueller was one of the people that was being interviewed?

HABERMAN: I did, actually.

TRUMP: He was sitting in that chair. We had a wonderful meeting.

HABERMAN: Day before, right?

SCHMIDT: Did he want the job?

TRUMP: The day before! Of course, he was up here, and he wanted the job.

HABERMAN: And he made that clear to you? He would have——

________

TRUMP: So, now what happens is, he leaves the office. Rosenstein leaves the office. The next day, he is appointed special counsel. I said, what the hell is this all about? Talk about conflicts? But he was interviewing for the job. There were many other conflicts that I haven’t said, but I will at some point. So Jeff Sessions, Jeff Sessions gave some bad answers.

HABERMAN: You mean at the hearing?

TRUMP: Yeah, he gave some answers that were simple questions and should have been simple answers, but they weren’t. He then becomes attorney general, and he then announces he’s going to recuse himself. Why wouldn’t he have told me that before?

HABERMAN: Why do you think it was? What do you think it was?

TRUMP: I don’t know.

BAKER: What would cause you — what would be the line beyond which if Mueller went, you would say, “That’s too far, we would need to dismiss him”?

TRUMP: Look, there are so many conflicts that everybody has. Then Rosenstein becomes extremely angry because of Comey’s Wednesday press conference, where he said that he would do the same thing he did a year ago with Hillary Clinton, and Rosenstein became extremely angry at that because, as a prosecutor, he knows that Comey did the wrong thing. Totally wrong thing. And he gives me a letter, O.K., he gives me a letter about Comey. And by the way, that was a tough letter, O.K. Now, perhaps I would have fired Comey anyway, and it certainly didn’t hurt to have the letter, O.K. But he gives me a very strong letter, and now he’s involved in the case. Well, that’s a conflict of interest. Do you know how many conflicts of interests there are? But then, then Comey also says that he did something in order to get the special prose— special counsel. He leaked. The reason he leaked. So, he illegally leaked.

Trump took to Twitter to express his vexation with Sessions, who was on an MS-13 mission in El Salvador at the time (see his priorities!):

So why aren’t the Committees and investigators, and of course our beleaguered A.G., looking into Crooked Hillarys crimes & Russia relations?

On July 27, Sessions told Tucker Carlson (Fox News) how ‘hurtful’ the President’s tweets were. Note that he defended his recusals:

He never should have taken the job!

Mueller conflicts of interest

To go into all the conflicts of interest in this investigation would take ages. Uranium One is the biggest, and it involves Russia, Mueller and Rosenstein.

That said, the public were angry at the way Big Media — especially CNN — were reporting the Mueller investigation.

On July 24, a contributor to The_Donald posted a testy thread, the title of which is:

FAKE NEWS CNN defending Sessions’ recusal while DEAD SILENT about Mueller needing to recuse for the same reasons. MUELLER IS MORE CONFLICTED THAN SESSIONS! REPORT THE TRUTH!

By way of reply, someone posted a link to a Crime and Consequences article, ‘My View: Mueller is Conflicted Out‘. The premise of the article is that Robert Mueller cannot continue to serve as Special Counsel under 28 USC Section 528 and 28 CFR Section 45.2. You can read the article for the detail.

The author provides an excellent summary of Mueller, James Comey and more. The following continues to be discussed today, particularly in light of Comey’s recent book launch and associated interviews:

Jim Comey and Bob Mueller have been friends for about 15 years

Comey now finds himself smack-dab at the center of the Russian investigation over which Mueller presides. Questions swirl around Comey — about whether the President wanted/hinted/hoped/asked/directed/or something else the investigation of National Security Adviser Gen. Flynn to be stopped/abandoned/slowed/soft-peddled/something else. This is probably the central element of the obstruction of justice case Mr. Trump’s opponents would like to see made against him.

Questions also swirl about Comey’s notes about this conversation, why he gave them to a private individual (Prof. Dan Richman of Columbia Law) to convey to the press. Additional questions have arisen about whether this curious and seemingly devious means of putting contents of the notes in the public domain (leaking, in other words) was designed specifically to bring about the appointment of a Special Counsel outside the President’s direct reach — and, indeed, whether Comey wanted, expected or intended his friend Mueller to get the job.

There is much to be said of all this, none of it very happy-making. But one thing that can be said with considerable clarity if not comfort is that, under the governing rules (set forth above), Mueller has a long-term relationship with Comey that “may result in a personal…conflict of interest, or the appearance thereof.”

He is therefore disqualified. I hope and believe that Mueller, whom I believe to be an honest man and a partisan of the rule of law, will see this for himself. If he doesn’t, I hope Rod Rosenstein will.

As I’ve said in many other contexts, I like rule-orientation and fear self-justification, a ubiquitous flaw in even the best of men. There is no way Comey is not a central witness in this investigation (if not a subject). Even less is there a way Mueller can be expected to evaluate Comey’s credibility with the fresh neutrality, arm’s-length curiosity, and objective sharp eye his job demands.

Whether Mueller’s departure would work out well or badly for Mr. Trump is not knowable (it is also decidedly not the subject of this post). My point is about the application of stated rules to the facts at hand. Let the chips fall where they may, the application is clear: Mueller cannot remain as Special Counsel.

That article was from June 2017. Nearly one year later, nothing has changed. Mueller’s still in situ.

On September 20, Law & Crime‘s Rachel Stockman asked why Rosenstein wasn’t recusing himself from the Mueller probe. Because Sessions recused himself, Rosenstein is the DOJ’s link to Mueller (emphases in the original, those in purple mine):

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosentein is overseeing Special Counsel Robert Mueller‘s Russia investigation after Jeff Sessions recused himself. However, there are some concerns about his ability to adequately supervise an investigation that he has now become a part of. On Tuesday night, The Wall Street Journal broke the story that over the summer, Mueller’s investigators interviewed Rosentein about President Donald Trump‘s firing of former FBI Director James Comey.

The Journal claims the FBI’s handling of the interview “could be a sign that Mr. Mueller’s team doesn’t view Mr. Rosenstein as a central witness in its probe, as the deputy attorney general hasn’t withdrawn himself from overseeing it since that interview.” That could very well be the case, but the optics don’t look good. A spokesperson for Rosenstein said “if there comes a time when he needs to recuse, he will. However, nothing has changed.” Well, now might be the time …

Rosenstein, as a federal lawyer and a DOJ employee, is guided by both local D.C. ethics rules and Justice Department guidelines. Both would prohibit him from overseeing an investigation if he is a person of interest or a target

However, legal experts emphasize that we don’t know yet whether Rosenstein is a target of the investigation for his role in writing that infamous memo giving Trump “justification” for firing Comey.  Did Rosenstein cooperate in a lie to the public?  18 USC 1512(c)(2) says that obstruction happens when a person “corruptly… impedes [an] official proceeding or attempts to do so.”

“Creating a false narrative for firing Comey could be such an attempt. The definition of ‘official proceeding; includes “a proceeding before a Federal Government agency which is authorized by law.’ That language is broad enough to encompass the FBI and the Comey investigation,” Gillers said.

Now, the hope is that if the investigation starts honing in on Rosenstein, Mueller would advise him that he needed to recuse himself.  BUT there is this added wrinkle: Mueller may have an incentive in wanting to keep Rosentein as his supervisor. Trump’s team has hinted more than once that he might fire Mueller. Federal law says that technically Trump can’t do the firing. Instead, the U.S. Attorney General (or in this case Rosenstein since Sessions recused himself) would have to do it. From all indications, Rosenstein would probably not demure to such a demand from Trump …

In the end, we must rely on Mueller’s integrity, and pray that if Rosenstein was in legal jeopardy, Mueller would do the right thing and ask him to take himself off the investigation. In the wake of James Comey’s breach in DOJ policy, asking us to trust our public officials seems like a scary thought. With so much at stake, so many unknowns, and the world watching, Mr. Rosenstein needs to think long and hard about recusing himself. 

Well, Rosey’s still managing the Mueller investigation.

September 2017 – calls for unrecusal

By September, there were calls for Sessions to unrecuse himself. Here’s Tom Fitton of Judicial Watch:

By December, there was doubt as to whether Sessions should have recused at all:

On December 18, Alan Dershowitz offered the clearest rationale for an unrecusal. Emphases mine below.

He told Fox & Friends (video at the link):

Sessions could un-recuse himself, because the law allows anyone who’s recused themselves to un-recuse if there are new developments or circumstances.

And Dershowitz said the reason Sessions can do this, is because Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein should recuse himself.

Rosenstein is a “key witness” after writing the memo justifying Jim Comey’s firing.

November 2017 – question over possible Uranium One recusal

On November 2, Breitbart reported that Rep. Mark Gaetz (R – Florida) told them that Sessions would recuse over Uranium One (H/T: Conservative Treehouse). Bold emphasis in the original, those in purple mine:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told a small group of lawmakers in late September he was recused from appointing a special counsel to look into potential corruption surrounding the Uranium One deal and Fusion GPS’s work on the Trump dossier, according to one of the lawmakers present.

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) told Breitbart News on Wednesday that he and other House Judiciary Committee Republicans had met with Sessions at the Justice Department on September 28 in advance of an upcoming committee hearing with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein later this month.

Gaetz said that when he asked Sessions to appoint a special counsel to investigate the 2010 Uranium One deal and Fusion GPS, the attorney general stood up, said he could not discuss the matter because he had recused himself, and walked out of the room, leaving them with a group of Rosenstein staffers “who showed no interest.”

“He said that anything that had to do with 2016 election, or Russia, or the candidates in the 2016 election, fell under the scope of his recusal, and he left the room,” Gaetz said.

“It was Sessions’ position that his recusal on the Russia matter divorced him from any oversight on Uranium One and Fusion GPS. That’s troubling. Sessions’ recusal is a function of his involvement in the Trump campaign. In no world does that impact his judgment as it relates to Fusion GPS and Uranium One. But he views the recusal more broadly. That’s troubling because that puts Rosenstein in charge,” he said.

Gaetz said Rosenstein’s staffers provided “no answers” and “no timeline for answers.”

This is why many of us have been saying that Sessions must resign or, as such time as the Senate will approve a replacement, be fired.

Yet, investigative journalist Sara Carter told Fox’s Sean Hannity that the report was not true:

I hope Sara Carter is correct.

November 2017 – Sessions critics told they are disloyal

Sleepy’s critics are constantly being told by his supporters that by being critical of him they are being critical of Trump! False!

As much as I liked Imperator_Rex — currently Vachel Lindsay — on Twitter, the logic that he and others employ with this stance is wrong. Here’s a taster from a rather long thread of his from November 3:

Who knows what’s happening with The Storm? All the people we want to see brought to justice have been going on book tours (Hillary, Comey), giving speeches overseas (Obama) and leading a normal life (e.g. John Podesta).

Re 36, no, it’s not because Trump ‘wants’ Sessions there, it’s because the only way Trump can get a replacement for him is if he (Sessions) resigns (vacancy rules apply).

The Senate told Trump in 2017 that they will not approve any new cabinet members, making it impossible for Trump to fire Sessions. Nor will the Senate allow Trump to appoint someone new when the Senate is not in session. Consequently, the Senate has not been declaring any formal recess.

Trump’s hands are tied, unless Sessions resigns.

Even then, Trump has to have a replacement in mind.

It certainly won’t be Rosenstein.

Re 37, saying that Sessions critics are disloyal to Trump is egregious. We care deeply about President Trump. That’s why we want Sessions out of the way, so that Swamp rats can be dealt with the way the Founding Fathers intended.

Again, we have only Sara Carter’s word for that.

December 2017 – Former FBI director Kallstrom says Mueller should recuse

On December 4, former FBI director James Kallstrom told Breitbart that Robert Mueller should recuse himself:

“Bob Mueller should have never been offered nor accepted the job as special counsel as he has a huge conflict of interest,” Jim Kallstrom tells Breitbart News …

Not only do observers describe Mueller and the man he recommended to replace him as FBI director, James Comey, as close or even best friends, but the special counsel pursues an investigation heavily involving the bureau he once led. How one maintains detachment in leading a team that includes numerous anti-Trump partisans in a probe involving one’s close friend and the former bureau for which Mueller served as director goes unexplained.

Other problems Kallstrom sees include the means by which investigators obtained information and what constituted probable cause to obtain it.

“The Obama administration apparently, had the advantage of using electronic surveillance, collecting information on the Trump campaign,” Kallstrom explains. “That collection, in my view, may be found to be unlawful.”

If the surveillance and investigatory methods prove unlawful, Kallstrom notes that this puts Mueller in an awkward position of looking into his close friend and perhaps the bureau that both men once led.

“If they used the phony dossier as the predicate for the FISA order they obtained, that could be a huge problem,” Kallstrom tells Breitbart News. “If they knew the information was phony, that is a felony. If they did not know it was phony, they were incompetent.”

January 2018 – White House tried to talk Sessions out of recusal

On January 5, 2018, Fox News reported that White House officials tried to talk Sessions out of recusing himself in 2017 (emphases mine):

President Trump instructed three senior White House officials to talk Attorney General Jeff Sessions out of recusing himself from the Justice Department’s investigation into potential ties between Russia and members of the Trump campaign, multiple sources told Fox News on Friday.

Trump called on White House counsel Don McGahn, former Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and former Press Secretary Sean Spicer to stop Sessions from recusing himself.

Spicer has denied the allegation.

The push to convince Sessions allegedly took place over the course of a number of telephone calls that covered a variety of other topics, the well-placed sources told Fox.

On Thursday, The New York Times first reported that Trump had directed McGahn to contact Sessions this past March. According to The Associated Press, two anonymous sources confirmed that McGahn unsuccessfully lobbied Sessions to continue to oversee the Russia investigation.

Sessions supporters will have trouble with ‘multiple sources’ and ‘anonymous sources’, but every single presidential administration has had them.

My upcoming McMaster chronicle shows that, nearly every time one of these sources spoke to the media, they were telling the truth.

March – Sessions took recusal advice from Obama lawyers

Just when the Sessions situation couldn’t seem more intolerable, the Gateway Pundit reported on March 14 that the attorney general took recusal advice from Obama adminstration lawyers (emphases in the original):

On Wednesday night FOX News contributor and legal expert Gregg Jarrett told Sean Hannity that Sessions used the WRONG LAW when announcing his recusal. He took advice from OBAMA OFFICIALS and they misled him.

Gregg Jarrett: He betrayed the president. He knew when he was sworn in that he was going to recuse himself and the very next day he put the recusal in motion. He never told the president about that. And by the way he cited the regulation in his recusal… He cited the wrong law. It didn’t apply.

Sara Carter: I think he was being advised badly at the time.

Gregg Jarrett: Yeah, by Obama’s holdovers. Who in the world would believe them?

Good grief! He cited the wrong law!

The DOJ regulation Sessions cited — 28 CFR 45.2— says “no DOJ employee may participate in a criminal investigation or prosecution if he has a personal or political relationship with any person or organization substantially involved in the conduct that is the subject of the investigation or prosecution, or who would be directly affected by the outcome.”

As Andrew McCarthy at National Review reported, “The regulation he cited applies to a different type of investigation.”

Once again the question must be asked: Who did deep state catch Jeff Sessions in bed with?

My thoughts exactly.

April 2018 – Congress asks Sessions to investigate Swamp

On April 18, members of Congress wrote to Sessions, FBI Director Christopher Wray and United States Attorney John Huber requesting that they issue a criminal referral for a long list of Swamp dwellers, including FBI Director James Comey, Hillary Clinton and others – including FBI employees Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, for a laundry list of potential crimes surrounding the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

You can read the letter in full at Scribd.

ZeroHedge has more (emphases in the original):

Recall that Sessions paired special prosecutor John Huber with DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz – falling short of a second Special Counsel, but empowering Horowitz to fully investigate allegations of FBI FISA abuse with subpoena power and other methods he was formerly unable to utilize.

The GOP letter’s primary focus appears to be James Comey, while the charges for all include obstruction, perjury, corruption, unauthorized removal of classified documents, contributions and donations by foreign nationals and other allegations.

The letter also demands that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein “be recused from any examination of FISA abuse,” and recommends that “neither U.S. Attorney John Huber nor a special counsel (if appointed) should report to Rosenstein.”  

April 2018 – possible partial recusal in Cohen investigation

Early in April, the home, office and hotel room of President Trump’s personal lawyer Michael Cohen were ransacked.

It’s possible that Sessions could recuse himself from this, too — at least partially.

On April 24, Gateway Pundit carried a news story, ‘WTH? AG Sessions Will Not Recuse Himself From Cohen Investigation — Only on Certain Issues‘ (emphases in the original):

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has decided not to recuse himself from the investigation into Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Don’t get too excited because Sessions will consider stepping back on specific matters tied into the Cohen probe …

On Tuesday, GOP Rep. Lee Zeldin sent a letter to AG Sessions demanding to know his involvement in the FBI raid of Cohen.

“We would like to know if you approved, were consulted, or had any involvement in this decision by the Department of Justice,” Zeldin asked in a letter to AG Sessions about the FBI raid of Cohen on April 9th.

Gateway Pundit cited a Reuters article which says that Sessions discussed the matter at a Senate appropriations subcommittee meeting about the proposed 2019 budget for the Justice Department. Please read it, because it’s got all the classic Sessions recusal statements.

Conclusion

To date, Sessions’s recusals look increasingly like refusals to do the AG job in its entirety.

Jeff Sessions is up for the chop. It’s just a matter of time and circumstance. After the Cohen raid, Trump is even unhappier with the AG and the DOJ than he was a year ago at this time.

My reader George True has posted eloquent comments here.

I used two, with his consent, as guest posts:

Guest post: a reader’s perspective on the Florida school shooting (February 23 comment)

Guest post: a reader’s perspective on the Deep State and Mueller investigation (April 15, George True)

George’s latest is about Jeff Sessions’s priorities, initially posted here in reply to ‘Increasing outcry for Sleepy Sessions to go’.

George has kindly consented to my using his comment as a guest post. Q is the intel source dropping geopolitical breadcrumbs. Sundance is the founder and author of The Conservative Treehouse. Emphases mine below.

I really do not know what to believe at this point in time. Q keeps saying ‘trust Sessions’. Sundance keeps saying ‘trust Sessions’. Yet Sessions appears to have been MIA for fifteen months, while the entire time his boss (our President) has been continuously savaged by the MSM, the DNC, and rogue agencies such as the FBI and Sessions’ own agency, the DOJ.

One of the highly publicized actions of the DOJ under Sessions is the rounding up of MS-13 gang bangers in certain parts of our country. While I am in favor of this, what good does it do without also reining in the agencies that promoted and facilitated the importation of massive numbers of Mexican criminals in the first place? And in any case, how is arresting MS-13 members MORE important than arresting the ringleaders of what is now known to have been an attempted coup and overthrow of the lawfully and constitutionally elected government of the United States?

As I have opined in prior comments at this blog, I sincerely hope and pray that there is far more going on under the radar than we everyday people can possibly see. One of two possibilities exists. Either Sessions is doing essentially nothing……..OR, he is fully engaged in the greatest stealth operation of getting the goods on the Deep State criminal cabal that there has ever been. In other words, boiling the frog so slowly that he won’t realize it until too late.

Only time will tell. And time is running out. Primary elections are almost upon us, and the mid-term elections are just six months away. If there is no action against the coup plotters soon, the Republicans stand to lose big, possibly losing one or both houses of congress. Just today, April 20, the corrupt and criminal DNC filed suit against the Trump campaign in federal court. This highly visible lawsuit breathes new life into the ab initio false narrative of Trump being elected as a result of ‘collusion’ with Russia.

The suit will go nowhere. Its entire purpose is to continue the fraudulent claims against Trump for the purpose of tilting the all-important mid-term elections to the Democrats. Once they have even marginal control of congress, they will vote to impeach Trump. Even if they are unsuccessful in removing him, they will effectively hamstring his administration for the rest of his time in office. Only the public exposure and prosecution of the Democrat coup plotters by Jeff Sessions’ DOJ prior to then will blunt the ongoing propaganda campaign of the left and prevent a mid-term debacle. We will soon know whether Sessions is the real deal or not. Let us pray we do not find out the hard way due to complete inaction on the part of Sessions.

I couldn’t agree more, George.

What now looms in my mind is the possibility that Jeff Sessions has been compromised.

In February, Sessions had dinner with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein — the de facto Attorney General after Sessions’s recusals — and Solicitor General Noel Francisco at a restaurant near the Justice Department. Was it, as the Washington Post posits, a show of solidarity?

The same WaPo article, published on April 20, zeroed in on Sessions’s rumoured loyalty to Rosenstein, who is closest to Robert Mueller and his investigation: ‘Sessions told White House that Rosenstein’s firing could prompt his departure too’:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently told the White House he might have to leave his job if President Trump fired his deputy, Rod J. Rosenstein, who oversees the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, according to people familiar with the exchange.

Sessions made his position known in a phone call to White House counsel Donald McGahn last weekend, as Trump’s fury at Rosenstein peaked after the deputy attorney general approved the FBI’s raid April 9 on the president’s personal attorney Michael Cohen

In the phone call with McGahn, Sessions wanted details of a meeting Trump and Rosenstein held at the White House on April 12, according to a person with knowledge of the call. Sessions expressed relief to learn that their meeting was largely cordial. Sessions said he would have had to consider leaving as the attorney general had Trump ousted Rosenstein, this person said.

Another person familiar with the exchange said Sessions did not intend to threaten the White House but rather wanted to convey the untenable position that Rosenstein’s firing would put him in.

Sessions’s primary loyalty should be to President Trump rather than Rod Rosenstein. The Mueller investigation is going nowhere, and Rosenstein is the one who appointed Mueller on May 17, 2017 without consulting with Sessions beforehand:

The decision took Trump by surprise and greatly angered him.

Back to the present: on April 20, Donald McGahn gave Rosenstein a set of presidential cufflinks he wore at his appearance before the Supreme Court on April 23 to argue a case about sentencing in a drugs case conviction.

It’s difficult for the public to know what to think.

If President Trump did fire Rosenstein and Sessions subsequently resigned, then Trump could get a Senate-approved replacement for the AG spot under vacancy rules.

It wouldn’t hurt for Trump’s supporters to have a bit of clarity about this situation.

A post about Sessions’s recusals is coming soon.

Over the past week, there has been an increasing America’s attorney general, Jeff Sessions — former senator for Alabama — to resign or be fired.

He is supposed to be ‘honorable’, yet he fails to stop highly questionable moves by the Mueller investigation against President Donald Trump.

He is known to be the ‘silent assassin’ and ‘silent executioner’ from his days as US Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama and, subsequently, the state’s attorney general.

The problem is that when Sessions thinks of criminals, only gang members, drug dealers and human traffickers come to mind. Fair enough. However, he has spent too long in Washington DC to see another criminal class: politicians and government employees.

Because of that blind spot, he cannot be an effective attorney general (AG). And, as important as jailing gang members, drug dealers and human traffickers is, the overriding national concern right now is upholding the Constitution and putting crooked politicians — past and present — behind bars.

The latest episode in this long drawn out investigation of Robert Mueller’s is that President Trump’s personal attorney, Michael Cohen, had his home, office and the hotel room in which he was staying at the time ransacked by the FBI in New York on Monday, March 9, 2018 (Mueller is pictured at top right, Sessions beneath him):

Remember that Mueller and his team are only supposed to be investigating alleged Russian collusion involving Trump and his team. After nearly a year, they have not found any evidence of that with regard to the Trump campaign, so they have moved the goalposts and expanded their brief to find anything against Trump or one of his associates.

Jeff Sessions can’t help. Shortly after Mueller came on board, Sessions recused himself from any investigation into the presidential campaign of which he had been a part.

As Mueller’s investigation seems to be all-encompassing, Sessions’s hands are effectively tied.

There are those who say he could recuse, because of various irregularities with the investigation. However, it is likely he will play by the rules.

Therefore, for all intents and purposes, deputy AG Rod Rosenstein effectively runs the Department of Justice (DOJ).

With regard to Michael Cohen:

Meanwhile, former Secret Service agent Dan Bongino points out the obvious:

This is something Sessions could — and should — work on:

He can — and should — assign work involving MS-13, drug dealers and human traffickers to subordinates in the DOJ and FBI. As it stands:

A lot of us had high hopes for Sleepy, who seemed pretty alert at first, but now the United States is approaching, if not already in, a constitutional crisis:

Ultimately:

Sessions could be investigating any number of those scandals and crimes, but he is not. His all-around inactivity in this regard is harming the nation, regardless of what many think:

On Tuesday, April 10, Judge Andrew Napolitano, legal analyst for Fox News, blamed the Cohen raid on Sessions’s recusal and said that he never should have accepted the AG appointment (emphases mine below):

Napolitano said the government raided Cohen’s office looking for evidence of bank fraud and believes it never would have escalated to this point if Sessions had made different choices.

[Sessions] should have never accepted the appointment,” Napolitano said. “The Russia investigation started in October of 2016 and he knew he was going to be a witness. But if he felt he had to recuse himself — Mr. President you are entitled to an attorney general in whom have you great confidence. I’m not sure if I’m the guy if I recuse myself. Half of what the DOJ does, I will have nothing to do with.”

Earlier, on Saturday, April 7, longtime political strategist, Trump friend and earliest campaign manager Roger Stone said that congressmen have told him Sessions might not be mentally fit for office. Mediaite reported on a radio interview Stone gave that day to WMAL’s Steve Malzberg:

Stone replied that Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein is the “de facto attorney general,” before making a jaw-dropping allegation:

“I think Jeff Sessions is either neutered or non compos mentis. He may in fact even be senile.”

Malzberg asked if those comments should be taken literally, and Stone responded in the affirmative.

Members of congress who have met with me have told me that he’s around the bend, he makes little sense, that he seems befuddled, confused, bewildered. So yeah, something is not well, he needs to step down.”

After President Trump found out about the raid on Michael Cohen, he spoke out:

“The Attorney General made a terrible mistake when he recused himself,” Trump said, raising again his dissatisfaction with Sessions for recusing himself from matters relating to the Russia investigation.

On April 10, The Daily Caller reported that two congressmen are awaiting overdue documentation from Sessions and Rosenstein about intelligence abuses:

Republican Reps. Jim Jordan and Mark Meadows appeared together on “Fox & Friends” Tuesday to express their displeasure with the Department of Justice and suggested a new attorney general might be the only cure.

Meadows of North Carolina and Jordan of Ohio said they were frustrated by delays within the DOJ, in turning over sensitive document related to intelligence abuses …

[Meadows] accused the FBI and DOJ of trying to hide information from Congress and said if Attorney General Jeff Sessions can’t get the job done then Trump should find someone who can.

Jim Jordan told The Daily Caller:

Congressman Jim Jordan says Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein should be “held accountable” for the leadership they have displayed at the Department of Justice, specifically as it relates to special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.

“I’ve been extremely disappointed,” the Ohio Republican told The Daily Caller in an interview Tuesday. “They’re keeping critical facts from us, like the conversation between Peter Strzok and Lisa Page where they talk about the relationship Strzok has with one of the FISA court judges, the same judge who by the way heard Michael Flynn’s case and recused himself after Flynn pled guilty.”

It’s not as if Sessions is the only one at the DOJ with conflicts of interests. Rod Rosenstein has them, too:

The congressman had previously suggested Sessions step down as AG, but he specifically stated Tuesday that Rosenstein should see punitive measures for his role in both the Mueller probe and the FBI’s original Trump-counterintelligence investigation.

Rod Rosenstein, who oversees the obstruction of justice investigation into the firing of James Comey, can he really do that when he’s the guy who wrote the memo recommending the firing of James Comey?” he posed. “[Rosenstein] signed one of the FISA renewals, despite knowing that the author of the dossier that the FISA warrant was based on had his relationship with the FBI terminated because he broke protocol and leaked information to the press — I mean, come on!

The Republican-majority Senate told Trump last year they would not approve any new cabinet appointments and still forbid him from making them while they are in recess. This puts the president in a bind. He might be able to make a lateral move by putting Scott Pruitt, current head of the Environmental Protection Agency, into the AG post.

Whatever the case, Sleepy Sessions would do well to wake up and smell the coffee, recuse himself (wherever possible), then get on the case. In terms of investigating politically oriented crimes, he has done a terrible job not only for President Trump — but also for the American people.

Coming soon: Sessions’s recusals explained

Q continues to divide Trump supporters.

When the original Q — Q Clearance Anon — began posting for several days from the end of October through the first week or so in November 2017 — a lot of us thought that high level indictments were under way.

Then, another Q took over, thought to be comprised of a handful of people in the White House. Since then, Q followers have been in two camps: those who expect ‘live action’ (as some Americans say nowadays) and those who have come to take Q’s news as it happens.

The first group is becoming disillusioned. Below is a case in point. Q’s original messages and others’ comments are on 8chan.net (not for the faint-hearted or easily offended, but I have retained the live links below for those interested in the threads). N.B.: I do not approve of the alienating 8chan content. Last month, Q wrote several times of ‘March madness’ and the following exchange took place (message 990):

Anonymous 875311

>>875265

I still follow your lead on all of this (relying more on the inquiry of those digging here), but March wasn’t nearly as ‘mad’ as what you sold us. Please don’t build us up to break us down, Q.

Q replied that the month’s madness was all about talks between South and North Korea and the upcoming talks involving the United States:

Q !xowAT4Z3VQ 875455

>875311

NK.
Q

To anyone waiting for Hillary Clinton to be arrested, that is not a very exciting answer. However, to those in the corridors of power, the possibility of resolving a six-decade old problem is. The Korean War never officially ended. If President Trump can get Kim Jong Un to denuclearise without a shot being fired, that would be an excellent and historic development, as no other US president has ever tried to attempt such a breakthrough.

Early in April, Q outlined the month’s developments (message 988, emphases in the original):

Q !xowAT4Z3VQ 875265

April [A].
IG report.
Sessions public attack.
RR problems.
Seals broken.
[A]rrests.
Why was Huber made public?
Why now?
Everything has meaning.
[A]wan.
Tarmac.
Iran.
NK.
U1.
FBI.
DOJ.
Mueller.
Election Integrity.
Immigration Bill.
Border.
Wall.
Military start.
BIG month.
Q

I wrote about Robert Mueller’s investigation, the FBI, DoJ and Inspector General (IG) Michael Horowitz a month ago. More is coming out and Horowitz’s long-awaited report might be out this month. I won’t be holding my breath.

That said, the day after Q posted this, news emerged about RR — Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. A memo from 2017 that Rosenstein sent Mueller suddenly surfaced allowing Mueller to go outside the scope of the Russian collusion investigation. On April 3, the Gateway Pundit reported (emphases in the original):

Last week we stated that the US is now in a constitutional crisis due to the unconstitutional and corrupt Mueller investigation kept in place by corrupt FBI and DOJ Leadership.  Former Trump Campaign Manager Paul Manafort may soon be the one to shut it all down.

Mueller’s illegal Trump-Russia investigation continues to take corrupt and unconstitutional actions while criminal activities in Obama’s FBI, DOJ and State Department are ignored. If there is justice, America will soon have a real investigation looking into the Obama and Clinton criminal acts while in office.

Paul Manafort first made arguments in a suit with Robert Mueller, Rod Rosenstein and Jeff Sessions as Head of the DOJ, related to illegalities in the way that Rosenstein set up the Mueller special counsel. Rosenstein’s special counsel order was not based on a crime and unconstitutionally stated that Mueller could basically look at anything he wanted to look at. These provisions are against the law and are now for the courts to settle.

The FBI raided Mr and Mrs Manafort’s home during the early hours of the morning in late July 2017, alarming them both, to say the least. The heretofore unseen Rosenstein memo, dated August 2, 2017, was:

supposedly directing Mueller to look into Manafort actions with a Russian operative perhaps before 2016. This however is clearly outside the scope of Sessions’ recusal as argued by Manafort and doesn’t even address Manafort’s argument that these actions are not for Mueller to take or Rosenstein to order but are Sessions actions alone as AG.

If Rosenstein and Mueller can’t come up with something legal and constitutional their gooses may finally be cooked by of all people, Paul Manafort. We can only hope and pray for justice.

In message 1028, Q presented a series of questions about the Mueller investigation, with information no doubt to be revealed in the months ahead. The same message had this about Trump, Manafort and a Trump campaign volunteer, Carter Page, whose stay was short:

It was not supposed to be revealed POTUS is not under criminal investigation _ NOT YET.
Traitor.
Massive intel sweep.
Manafort was a plant …

Carter Page was a plant.
Trace background.
Open source.
Why is Mueller going after ‘inside plants’?

Oh well, at least Paul Manafort got then-candidate Trump the necessary delegates to win the Republican nomination in July 2016.

As for the Awans, see Wikipedia for now. I have a whole collection of articles, but there is too much to go into for the purposes of this post.

Construction of the border wall began on March 26 by the Army Corps of Engineers based in Greencastle, Indiana. The emblem of the Army Corps of Engineers is a white castle on a red background. Q referred to this last month on the day President Trump said wall construction would begin the following Monday:

Depending on the context, a future mention might mean this particular unit in relation to the wall.

In other matters domestic, we might find out more about the tarmac meeting Bill Clinton had with Obama’s Attorney General Loretta Lynch in the summer of 2016, when he boarded her plane for a private conversation. A big no-no.

On March 30, Fox News reported that Attorney General Jeff Sessions appointed a federal prosecutor, John Huber, to look into:

certain issues involving the FBI, the Clinton Foundation and Uranium One, but said he would not appoint a second special counsel at this point. 

In a letter directed to Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte and House Oversight Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy, Sessions revealed that he asked U.S. Attorney John Huber to lead the evaluation into issues raised by the committees in recent months. 

Huber’s appointment is definitely a positive step. I hope it means the IG’s report is coming soon.

North Korea is still in the mix as is Iran. With Mike Pompeo in place as Secretary of State after Rex Tillerson’s departure, things will begin moving rapidly. Pompeo and Trump see eye to eye. Also, John Bolton has replaced HR McMaster as National Security Adviser. Although I am not a fan of Bolton, he and Trump are on the same page geopolitically. Bolton has been known to do what he is asked. As Trump believes in negotiating solutions rather than starting wars, I’m praying for a positive, lasting outcome.

Q also signalled that Silicon Valley giants could be brought down to size (message 989):

Q !xowAT4Z3VQ 875289

>875265
Facebook.
Amazon.
Twitter.
GOOG. ……….. BIG problems.
Q

With regard to GOOG, Q gave us a name to watch for: Jared Cohen (message 1024). He is CEO of Jigsaw, formerly Google Ideas. He worked closely with Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton during their respective tenures as Secretary of State. He was on the social media side of ‘regime change’ outside of the US.

Q discussed the necessary presence of troops and future wall along the southern border to prevent the human ‘caravan’ (Pueblos sin Fronteras’ word) from entering the United States (message 1009). According to Q, this caravan seems to have been cooked up by the CIA (Clowns) and Democrats with big background money. John McCain (‘name we don’t say’) and Jeff Flake are pro-immigrant Republicans:

Q !xowAT4Z3VQ 894110

>>893904
Troops to Border.
Clown Black Ops.
Private funds.
Raised how?
Troops @ Border does what?
Impact?
To who?
D’s involved.
MS_13/Illegals road block.
Sex traffic road block.
Children road block.
Drugs road block.
Guns road block.
China/Russia pass-through-intel-pull road block.
Name we don’t say AZ road block.
Jeff Flake AZ road block.
Big money TERMINATE.
The WALL means more than you know.
The FIGHT for the WALL is for so much more.
Q

Message 1025 expressed gratitude and reminded everyone of the Q slogan ‘Where we go one, we go all’ (image courtesy of an 8chan reader, not Q):

Q !xowAT4Z3VQ 898990

We are sincerely appreciative for your kind words and appreciation. Means more than you know. Each one read in full. We are in this together. WWG1WGA.
2018 will be glorious!!
God bless,
Q

As I write, there have been four military air crashes during the first week of April. (UPDATE: A fifth occurred on Saturday, April 7, also noted by Q (message 1068).)

A Chinese satellite also fell to earth.

Such a close succession of military crashes is practically unheard of.

Q had this to say (message 1030):

Coincidence or silent war?
Pray.
Night
[2]
Q

An 8chan contributor commented:

4th crash chances of all being accidents is less than 1% (0.8%), and Q basically confirms it ain’t accidents. Damn

As for the satellite, Q asked (message 1033):

Q !xowAT4Z3VQ 914510

>914474
What fell from space recently?
Accident or retaliation?
Q

China hasn’t said much about the satellite and the media are reporting it as a routine event.

Q’s questions point to rogue players in various national governments. An 8channer offered this explanation, which is along the same Q themes from last year (emphases mine):

have anons not learned yet?
the cabal is GLOBAL
that means chinese russian israel britain USA ALL have traitors
xi putin and potus are leading the fight against them
much disinfo and acting
never telegraphn
make enemies guess
WE ARE WINNING
there are many traitors and criminals that can inflict damage but THEY CANNOT WIN

In closing, Q has referenced this short video from the Military Channel three times in the past few days:

Q has mentioned April showers more than once. I hope rain — justice — is due for America’s domestic enemies.

I hope to revisit this post at the beginning of May, if not before.

When we’re talking about Q and the forecasted Storm, a lot of people expect to see everything that’s happening.

If they cannot ‘see’ the Storm, it’s not happening.

Q took on board 8chan contributors’ comments a few months ago and began to make more information public — 40 per cent instead of 20 per cent (message 527):

Q !UW.yye1fxo 15

[MONDAY]
Next Week – BIGGER.
PUBLIC.
We LISTENED [20/80 />/ 40/60].
Q

Yet, things are happening as they should be. The players involved — on both sides — know what’s going on.

Not everything has to be White House-related to be part of the Storm, either.

As one example, below is an image montage with a letter from congressman Bob Goodlatte (R-Virginia), who has issued a subpoena to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to appear before the House Judiciary Committee, which Goodlatte chairs:

The image at the top left is Goodlatte’s letter. A copy of the subpoena is on the top right. (This tweet has the second page: the details.)

Below that are two Q messages with accompanying analyses. Andrew McCabe is the recently sacked deputy director of the FBI. Goodlatte wants details behind his dismissal: corruption in connection with Hillary’s emails.

If you’ve heard about Q but haven’t dived in, this tweet is a good starting point.

More on Rosenstein anon. One wonders if he will show up on April 5.

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