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Before I get to the main story, October has been Theresa May’s best month this year.

Her birthday was October 1:

During the extraordinary parliamentary session of Saturday, October 19, 2019, she stood firm with Boris on his new Brexit deal. That was principled, considering that David Cameron didn’t stand with her when she was PM. In fact, he resigned as the MP for Witney (Oxfordshire):

She gave an excellent speech that day:

Now, let us cast our minds back to 1961. Theresa Brasier was nearing her fifth birthday. Her parents, the Revd Hubert Brazier and Zaidee ‘Mary’ Brasier, played host to a 16-year-old German teenager from Bonn that summer at the vicarage in Church Enstone, Oxfordshire.

On July 24, 2019, Detlev J Piltz wrote a fascinating article about his four weeks with the Brasiers for The Oldie magazine, outstanding reading for anyone over the age of 40. He learned invaluable lessons about the English during his time in the Cotswolds.

Excerpts follow, emphases mine.

The Brasiers took young Detlev everywhere:

The four weeks I spent there enriched my life. Not only did I improve my schoolboy English and become more fluent, but the family took me with them on their shopping trips in their plush Morris Minor, usually to Chipping Norton.

On Sundays, the family and I attended the village church together. We all went to watch the motor racing at Silverstone, picnicked in the country, and the vicar showed me Oxford University and explained about its colleges.

He especially appreciated his time with the vicar:

What impressed me most were the many conversations that the Reverend Hubert, to call him by his first name, then in his mid-forties, carried on with a rather wet-behind-the-ears teenager.

The vicar, as folk in the village referred to him, was a good-hearted soul: clever, educated, helpful and gentle, yet quite clear about his moral and ethical principles. Perhaps this was also partly due to his slight stoop which, as he himself put it, had focused his concentration more on the spiritual than on the physical.

The parishioners – who visited us, or whom we visited – and the congregation in church always displayed an aura of love and devotion, but also respect, for their vicar.

I still admire him today for how he and his wife managed the not-so-easy duties of an English country clergyman. During my stay, I also learned something about Englishness and even about the English class system, although this knowledge was more sensed and intuited than consciously understood.

The Brasiers had just purchased a television set. A Test Match between England and Australia was being broadcast, so the vicar explained the rules of cricket to Detlev. Detlev also learned a lesson about the English. Only they can criticise their country. Foreigners cannot.

This is very true — and anyone coming here should remember it. It’s just how things are:

He straightforwardly concluded that the Australians would win, as they were both bowling and batting better than the English, an assessment with which I dutifully agreed.

This proved to be a mistake. My host took me to one side and explained, ‘You are quite right, Detlev. Australia is playing better than England. But perhaps I can give you a piece of advice for the future. As a foreigner, you would do well not to say so. Leave it to us.’

In a few words, the vicar had borne out a rule of English interaction with foreigners, summarised succinctly by George Orwell, ‘We spend our lives in abusing England but grow very angry when we hear a foreigner saying exactly the same things.’

Fortunately, comments in the opposite direction are allowed. If a foreigner praises certain features of England, the English are pleased, although they will immediately play down the merits of what has been admired and claim that it is actually not so great.

The bishop of the diocese visited the Brasiers on the last Sunday that Detlev was there. The couple made a point of impressing upon the young German the importance of manners:

something they had never previously done.

They told him to stay silent unless the bishop spoke to him:

I was also kindly advised not to engage the bishop in conversation myself, but to wait until he spoke to me, and to address him as ‘Bishop’, rather than Mr Johnson, or whatever his name might be.

They impressed upon him the finer points of tea drinking — always two cups:

a single cup was deemed impolite, as not enough; three cups were considered impolite, as too many.

Detlev did not like the special tea that Mrs Brasier served but refrained from commenting until later. It was probably Lapsang Souchong, a smoky tea:

‘It was Chinese tea,’ the vicar’s wife explained. When I asked why it was different from the tea we otherwise always drank, I heard for the first time in my life that it was ‘because of the bishop’.

The high point of his visit was when he accompanied the Brasiers to the local landowner’s for tea. Detlev had a keen interest in historic Royal Navy battles. When they arrived at Sir John’s house, Detlev could not contain his enthusiasm:

When we arrived in the entrance hall of the large and rather grand residence, I spotted on the opposite wall a painting of a scene from the 1916 Battle of Jutland, details of which were well known to me.

Without thinking, I stopped in front of the picture and said, ‘Oh, the famous manoeuvre of crossing the T [when a line of warships crosses in front of a line of enemy ships at right angles] by Admiral Jellicoe.’

Sir John treated his guests to tea and scones. Then he turned his attention to the young German:

Afterwards, Sir John asked me how I recognised the scene in the picture, and I told him about my interest in the Royal Navy. He signalled to me to follow him and we entered a room full of English naval memorabilia.

It transpired that Sir John had fought in the Battle of Jutland. For nearly a whole hour, he described the events and his role. I was eager to know whether he had known the English admirals, Jellicoe and Beatty, personally. It was an hour suffused with mutual affection between old and young, with never a word out of place, and certainly no nationalistic undertones. I remember it clearly and vividly to this day.

On the way home, Mrs Brasier expressed her disappointment that Sir John had not spent more time with them. The vicar responded:

Well, it may be years since he had such an admirer, let alone such a young one – and, by the way, he can do whatever he thinks fit.

Detlev’s stay with the Brasier family fostered in him a lifelong love of England.

In 2015, he and his wife visited the Cotswolds and passed through Church Enstone, where they stopped.

Detlev Piltz did not want to bother the present occupants of the vicarage, but he asked at the church what happened to the Brasiers:

… in the church, someone showed us a roll of past vicars, and there was the name of ‘my’ vicar, and his dates in office, from 1959 to 1971.

Piltz thought nothing more about it until the following year, which featured that momentous summer of the Brexit referendum and David Cameron’s immediate resignation, which was completely unnecessary but was perhaps for the better, given his Remainer views.

Lo, Theresa May won the Conservative leadership contest that summer:

The candidacy of Theresa May spawned widespread reporting about her background and early life. And only then did it become clear to me how small the world really can be.

For the idyllic village in the Cotswolds was Church Enstone, and the vicar and his wife were Hubert and Zaidee Brasier, although he always called her Mary. Sadly, I then learned that Hubert Brasier had been killed in a car accident in 1981, and his wife died the following year.

And I also learnt what had happened to their young daughter. She was called Theresatoday known to every Englishman and woman as Prime Minister Theresa May.

I thought that was such a terrific anecdote.

People have either made fun of Theresa May or criticised her mercilessly. We still don’t know what fully took place between her people and Angela Merkel’s regarding Brexit. Certainly, May’s downfall began when she put forward that London-Berlin Brexit deal in July 2018 at Chequers, when her own Brexit team, lead by David Davis, was putting together a proper exit plan (Canada ++), working together with Michel Barnier from the EU. May told a shocked assembly of her own ministers that it was her deal or the highway. The Evening Standard reported that she told ministers they could pay for their own transport back to London if they wanted to leave early. Brexit minister David Davis tendered his resignation afterwards as did Boris Johnson, who was Foreign Minister at the time.

My, how much water has passed under the dam since then. I hope that our former PM continues to vote in support of our present one, Boris Johnson.

I regret to report that our new exit deadline is January 31, 2020.

Jacob Rees-Mogg is the Leader of the House of Commons and a prominent Roman Catholic.

I will post more about him in due course. He is a kind and gentle man as well as a principled politician. His wife and children are blessed to have him as husband and father, respectively.

On Sunday, October 13, 2019, The Express published an article of his about the canonisation of St John Newman, which took place that day.

Excerpts from ‘The canonisation of a new British saint is a historic moment, says JACOB REES-MOGG’ follow, emphases mine.

The most historic fact is that St John Newman is the first British saint since 1401 who did not die as a martyr:

The last one was John of Bridlington, in 1401.

Rees-Mogg explains that, prior to the Reformation, nearly everyone in England revered the saints, although sometimes became angry with them. He offers the Catholic perception of sainthood:

Almost every individual would have had a particular saint to whom he or she prayed. Villages, towns, guilds – even the whole country – had saints who could be called upon. St George is the most famous now but St Edward the Confessor was much venerated, as were men such as St Thomas à Becket.

These saints would intercede for the individual or group, asking God to answer their prayers. They do not act individually but as a conduit between fallen Man and the inestimable divine.

It gives people a personal connection to God of an understandable and human kind, although in the Middle Ages the faithful sometimes took this a little far and could become cross if a saint’s intercession did not work. They might even throw the saint’s relics on to the floor

Not surprisingly, the Blessed Virgin is the most venerated and, historically, England had a particular devotion to her and was seen as “Our Lady’s Dowry”.

That said, the Prince of Wales, an Anglican, was among those who attended the canonisation ceremony at the Vatican.

Rees-Mogg tells us about John Newman’s life. He was the son of a banker and had a comfortable upbringing, yet one that involved Bible study at home:

Newman was born into a conventional Anglican family in 1801 where, as he said, he was “brought up from a child to take a great delight in reading the Bible”. This was a time before Catholic Emancipation, which came in 1829. When, aged just 16, he went to Trinity College, Oxford, it was not yet open to Catholics to study there.

He loved and was happy both at Trinity and later at Oriel College, where he became a fellow at the age of 21.

His incredible intellect led him to secular success and he won honour because of his spiritual virtue.

In the 19th century the Church of England was able to bring worldly as well as religious benefit to its leading figures. However Newman, after a period of intense struggle, gave all this up.

He had to resign his fellowship and office in the Church of England, which must have been especially difficult as it removed his income in middle age – as had happened to his own father when his bank had failed.

Rees-Mogg does not go into much detail about the years between 1822 and 1825, so here is a bit from the saint’s Wikipedia entry. Whilst at university, Newman was at the forefront of the Oxford Movement, which created High Church Anglicanism. The High Church revived pre-Reformation vestments and rituals. It was highly controversial at the time. Interestingly, Newman came to the Oxford Movement with strongly Calvinist leanings and held that the Pope was the Antichrist.

Newman’s father died in 1824, the same year that the young man was ordained an Anglican deacon at Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford. The following year, he was ordained an Anglican priest in the same cathedral. His first assignment was as curate at St Clement’s Church in Oxford.

Then, between 1825 and 1847, through his work both as a clergyman and fellow of Oriel College, Oxford, supplemented by his own writing and study, which involved travels to southern Europe, especially Italy, he began to shift theologically. In 1839, he began thinking about leaving Oxford and setting up a religious community. In 1842, he and a few friends left the city for the nearby town of Littlemore. They acquired a set of buildings in town and lived semi-monastic lives, writing and studying. The buildings later became Newman College.

In 1843, Newman took out an ad in the Oxford Conservative Journal, publishing an anonymous statement in which he renounced everything negative he had ever pronounced against the Catholic Church.

In 1845, he was received into the Catholic Church by an Italian priest in a rite held at Littlemore.

In 1846, Newman went to Rome. There he was ordained a Catholic priest, and Pius IX awarded him a Doctor of Divinity degree.

In 1847, Newman returned to England as part of the Oratorian community. He is responsible for founding the famous London Oratory as well as the Oratory in Edgbaston, near Birmingham, in the Midlands.

Newman lost many friends and family members from his immediate circle during these years.

Rees-Mogg offers this succinct summary of Newman’s conversion:

Newman’s conversion was not led by any hostility towards the Anglican Church. He argued for as long as he could that it was essentially Catholic, even maintaining that the Thirty-­Nine Articles, a famously Protestant declaration, were not incompat­ible with Catholicism.

However, in the end his studies on the Ancient Church led him to the conviction that “in speaking against the Church of Rome I may be speaking against the Holy Ghost”. This effectively forced him to con­ vert, regardless of the risk to friendship, finances and status.

Once Newman had converted he was freer to devote himself to elucidating and propagating the Faith.

As for the two Oratories:

The success today of the Brompton Oratory, which is full every weekend and benefits from many vocations, derives from Cardinal Newman, whose first Oratory was at Birmingham. This continu­ing benefit of his work shows how the lives of the saints influence others for genera­tions. Newman spent his life searching for the truth and wanted to help others to find it too.

Rees-Mogg has this to say about saints and miracles:

Newman’s canonisation requires two authenticated miracles as proof of his sanc­tity. The first was that through his interces­sion, a man was cured of a spinal disease and the second a woman was healed of unstoppable bleeding.

Miracles are not caused by a saint but because a saint asks God to use His power.

Many people, even Christians, mock belief in miracles but, as Newman said, to anyone who can accept the most stupen­dous of all miracles – the Incarnation and Resurrection – lesser, almost minor mira­cles are easy to believe in.

Not surprisingly, a lot of hostile comments about Catholic belief followed Rees-Mogg’s article.

I offer this article partly for information and partly because my late mother, a lifelong Catholic, had always hoped that John Cardinal Newman would be canonised one day. That day has now arrived.

A 100-year-old RAF veteran died in Salford last week.

Oswald ‘Ossie’ Dixon has no family in England. It’s probable that he outlived his friends, too.

Therefore, an appeal has been sent for people living in the Salford/Manchester area to attend his funeral on Wednesday, October 9:

Originally from Jamaica, Ossie Dixon fought in the Second World War.

The Manchester Evening News — a great newspaper, by the way — featured an excellent and moving article on his life last week along with an appeal to attend his funeral:

An RAF veteran with no family has died at the age of 100.

Now the public are being asked to turn out to salute his life and sacrifice at his funeral.

Oswald Dixon – known as ‘Ossie’ – made Manchester his home after leaving Jamaica to serve during the Second World War.

He was the oldest resident at Broughton House care home for veterans in Salford and passed away peacefully at the home on September 25.

Mr Dixon turned 100 in April.

Known for his wicked sense of humour, he joined the RAF in Kingston, Jamaica, in November, 1944, as a flight mechanic then moved to Britain to serve before the conflict ended.

He became a leading aircraftman and remained in the service teaching new recruits until he retired.

Mr Dixon, who was registered blind, was living alone in Salford until he moved to Broughton House in 2015.

He received greetings from the Queen, the Government and the Jamaican High Commissioner on his milestone birthday earlier this year, which was celebrated at the care home with a huge party.

Co-op Funeral Care in Salford has arranged his funeral for Agecroft Cemetery and Crematorium in Salford on Wednesday, October 9.

The service is due to start at 2.20pm.

Read more here and see photos of this generous veteran who made it his life’s mission to help other people and bring joy into their lives.

I was particularly impressed by the photo of him on his 100th birthday in his dress uniform. He looked very smart, indeed.

May God bless Oswald Dixon with eternal rest in Heaven.

UPDATE — October 9:

I am pleased to report that many people turned out for Oswald Dixon’s funeral:

Johnny Mercer MP is our minister for veterans.

Once upon a time I really liked Britain’s Liberal Democrat Party.

They worked hard on local issues, opposing lazy Conservative and Labour councillors.

I knew one of them fairly well. We commuted into London together. Another Lib Dem councillor who lived nearby also took the same train. These were accessible people.

That was when Charles Kennedy led the party. Unfortunately, because of a personal issue that was becoming painfully obvious in public, he had to stand down.

When Menzies ‘Ming’ Campbell took over the party, it began to change. I remember going off them when they overwhelmingly voted to give convicts the right to vote. I have always felt very strongly that convicts have sacrificed their ‘right’ to vote. Harming someone, either physically or through property damage and theft, is inexcusable. They have broken the social contract. Even if they have done their time, that is the price they pay — forever, in my opinion.

Under Ming Campbell, the Lib Dems moved further leftward. Even the late Paddy Ashdown said at one of their party conferences a few years ago that they were a left-wing party. I was shocked to see someone I’d viewed as sensible say such a thing.

What follows is a recap of their 2019 party conference in Bournemouth — along with an update.

Kirsten Johnson resigns as PPC for North Devon

Yesterday, I wrote about Kirsten Johnson, the PPC (Prospective Parliamentary Candidate) for Devon. She has US/UK dual nationality and insulted the county’s Leave voters in a Radio 4 interview on Sunday, September 15, 2019.

Every party, from the Greens to the Conservatives, criticised her. What she said about the citizens of her adopted country was shameful.

Fortunately, the backlash was so great that she has since stood down as the Lib Dem PPC for North Devon:

In fact, she’s even deleted her Twitter account.

The following tweet is from the Conservative Party chairman and the current MP for North Devon. I like the North Devon resident’s response:

Guido Fawkes has an excerpt of her resignation statement:

It is with the deepest regret that I resign as the Parliamentary Candidate for North Devon Liberal Democrats with immediate effect.

I am acutely aware that my comments in the recent Radio 4 interview caused offence, and I reiterate my sincere apologies. Whilst I have had many very good interviews, on this occasion I totally lost the thread of what I was saying, which was interpreted in ways that I certainly did not intend or believe about the people of North Devon.

Uh huh.

At least the mask slipped now, rather than later.

Party conference unsettling

I caught probably two hours’ worth of the Lib Dem conference this year.

That was quite enough. What these MPs and councillors said was startling.

Each time I tried to watch BBC Parliament’s coverage at length, I had to turn off the television.

Did you ever have the experience growing up when you said or did something outrageous and a parent or grandparent said, ‘Stop it! You’re scaring me!’

Well, that was my reaction to the Lib Dems this year. What makes it even scarier is that many Britons think that they are still the reasonable political party they were in the 1990s. No, they are not.

See the lengthy list of conference motions that passed. Three of them follow.

Deprivation of citizenship

In the debate on Motion F34, Lib Dems said that the Home Secretary Sajid Javid was wrong to revoke ISIS bride Shamima Begum’s British nationality.

They want any future Home Secretary to go through the courts first!

On September 15, The Guardian reported that Christine Jardine, responsible for leading Lib Dem positions on home affairs, said:

The decision to strip someone of their citizenship is a very serious one and should only be taken when absolutely necessary. Instead, we have seen Conservative home secretaries abuse this power for political gain with tragic results.

“These are people brought up, often born here, with families and loved ones who deserve a government that will take responsibility when they are radicalised and go abroad to join terrorists. They should be prosecuted in the UK for their crimes and interrogated to learn exactly how this happens and prevent terrorists from recruiting more young Brits.

“Liberal Democrats demand better. We will introduce new safeguards so that home secretaries must show good reasons for revoking someone’s citizenship. We will also ensure that the best interests of any children involved are taken into account, and that no one is left stateless.

I watched a half hour of the debate on this and had to turn it off. Sajid Javid did the right thing. One of the talking points was discussing radicalisation with young people. Sorry, but there is no ‘educating’ people who want to be terrorists. Nothing and no one can stop them.

Climate crisis

I watched part of the debate about keeping data on everyone taking a trip on commercial aircraft. I had to turn that off, too.

While much data is gathered, part of Motion F29 concerned tabulating how many times an individual flew on a plane per year.

Fortunately, someone had the wisdom to say that a number of people who fly frequently on business would be adversely affected.

That said, Motion F29 passed. It calls for, among other things, a national Citizen’s Climate Assembly. Anything with ‘citizen’ in it should raise an alarm.

Music venues

I had to turn this debate off, too.

A musician and the PPC for Hove and Portslade, Beatrice Bass, moved Motion F25 on music venues.

Watching her, I sensed she felt quite angry towards England. I also noted a hint of a foreign accent. It turns out she was born in Davos, Switzerland, and has dual Swiss/UK nationality.

So, like the aforementioned failed American PPC, she, too, comes from abroad. They weren’t the only two, either. Several others from abroad also spoke at conference. I wonder if putting forward so many foreign PPCs is a good idea. Will they have England at the heart of their policies? I doubt it. But, I digress.

Beatrice Bass said that England is the only British country to have restrictive laws on music venues, especially with regard to noise. She wants those laws relaxed. Many of us do not. We are grateful for noise abatement laws. Some of us have to get up for school or work in the morning.

Glee Club

Speaking of music, every year, their party conference has a private evening session called Glee Club. Members make up songs ridiculing public figures.

This year’s stand out was the take on Tony Blair. I’m no fan of the former PM, but this is too much:

Guido Fawkes says that the song is a Glee Club oldie from 1995, now a party classic:

Lib Dems took part in their annual conference sing-a-long last night, and despite the referendum, their new recruits, and support from Alastair Campbell, Mrs Blair, and probably the Former Prime Minister too, they launched into the Lib Dem classic: “Tony Blair can f*ck off and die

The song, originally written in 1995 about rejecting the idea about coalition with the Labour Party, became a Lib Dem Glee Club favourite in the post-Iraq era. Guido brings you the lyrics so you can sing along at home:

So bye, bye to the great Lib-Lab lie
That it’s made in heaven
‘cos that’s pie in the sky
Us Lib Dems will take courage and cry
“Tony Blair can f*ck off and die”
“Tony Blair can f*ck off and die

Jo Swinson

This year, Jo Swinson made her first speech as party leader.

It is interesting that she wears red a lot. Is it because it’s her colour, or is she trying to send a message?

She probably considered the photo op as a team building exercise.

Guido Fawkes has the story (emphases in the original):

Jo Swinson staged what is set to be the oddest photo op of party conference season when she walked her MPs into the Bournemouth sea. There are honestly easier ways to get to Europe, guys…

Whilst there was a decent turnout for the photoshoot, some Lib Dem MPs not shore about the visuals chose not to cave into pier pressure. It really will be sink or swim for the Lib Dems over the next few months…

Some people have investigated Jo Swinson’s voting record when she was an MP both before and after the Conservative-Lib Dem coalition government (2010-2015). She voted more often with the Conservative government positions than Conservative MPs did:

Then there’s this, as seen on Twitter:

That editorial about a monument to Margaret Thatcher rings a definite bell. However, Swinson was a young MP at the time and I didn’t think any more about it. She was on some of the Sunday political television programmes around that time, too.

Jo Swinson not only did a dramatic turnaround on her conservative views as a Lib Dem, she also did a 180-degree turnaround on EU membership.

Adam Heilbron unearthed vintage footage of Swinson criticising the EU and proposing a referendum on the UK’s membership:

From that, Guido Fawkes’s team put together two videos:

reminding Guido of a time when the Lib Dems were both liberal and democratic… 

Guido concludes:

Give it another decade and she might have flopped back to being a eurosceptic again!

One cannot help but wonder if there is some sort of incentive behind these ginormous flip flops.

Article 50 revocation

Anyone fence-sitting on Brexit should be aware that voting for Lib Dems in a general election will lead to revocation of Article 50 straightaway.

It is unlikely that Jo Swinson will become PM. There is no way the Lib Dems could win a majority or even an overwhelming minority to form a government.

That said, they have firmly established themselves as the Remain party in Britain.

In her maiden conference speech as party leader, she invoked the memory of past party leader, the late Paddy Ashdown:

I wish he could see our party now.

However, Paddy Ashdown said he was firmly committed to following through with the Leave result:

On September 14, she wrote a piece for The Guardian which says:

The Liberal Democrats are the strongest Remain party in the UK, and we continue to grow, adding members, councillors and MPs. When a general election comes, we will be ready for it and ready to take our clear, pro-European message to the country. We want to stop Brexit, and if the Liberal Democrats win the general election then we will revoke article 50.

Our country deserves better than Jeremy Corbyn and Boris Johnson. The Liberal Democrats are the positive, hopeful alternative that the country needs.

That’s democracy in action (not).

At the same time, she calls out the new facial recognition surveillance:

I’m not a fan of it myself … but it’s a lot less dangerous than revoking Article 50!

In any event, the Lib Dems’ position on revocation of Article 50 without a second referendum has the cross-party People’s Vote campaign wondering about the party’s participation.

On September 17, Guido Fawkes had this:

His article says, in part:

One unexpectedly joyous by-product of the change of policy by the LibDems, to ignoring the referendum result totally, is that over at the People’s Vote campaign Tom Baldwin wants to purge LibDem MPs. James McGrory, the former LibDem SpAd for Clegg, is trying to keep them on board. Anna Soubry is saying they must be purged. So much for plurality and a new kind of centrist politics. Chaos….

Tom Baldwin has tweeted that our story is bollocks. Am assured that the question of the LibDem’s status with the campaign is being actively discussed in the office.

The day before, The Guardian published a pointed editorial on Swinson’s position. It ends with this:

The winner-takes-all mentality behind Ms Swinson’s policy is troubling. The lack of a democratic mandate for revoke means it could entrench a permanent divide in British life that will be impossible to bridge. Politicians ought to think about their policy’s consequences. If the Lib Dems’ idea is accepted, then why couldn’t the SNP be permitted to hold a second independence vote if it won the next Holyrood election? Then there are the accusations of inconsistency. In 2008 Ms Swinson wanted a referendum on EU membership. Two years later she campaigned on a manifesto that committed the Lib Dems to an in/out EU referendum. She was a minister in an austerity government that did so much to create the pain and division behind the leave howl. In 2016 an EU referendum took place. The country voted out. Three years later, Ms Swinson won’t accept the outcome of a plebiscite she had said she wanted.

The Lib Dems are positioning themselves to tap future popular revulsion against the major parties. Yet the politics of protest only works if there is something to protest about. If Boris Johnson strikes a Brexit deal with the EU, where does this leave Ms Swinson? The Lib Dem policy also gives Labour a clear run at a second referendum. Ms Swinson’s offer is just to permanently polarise the electorate around Brexit. The Lib Dems still have no distinctive pitch for issues beyond leaving the EU. This is the party of ideas, home to Keynes and Beveridge. But there’s no sign of a middle way being plotted by the party between the extremes. Unless Ms Swinson can do so, the odds will be stacked against the Lib Dems in a general election.

Even Polly Toynbee noted ‘Swinson’s remain extremism’.

Scottish PPC sacked

On September 16, Guido Fawkes reported that a Scottish Lib Dem PPC was given the heave-ho.

Galen Milne has made menacing remarks, to say the least, about prominent Conservatives — including the PM and Leader of the House, Jacob Rees-Mogg:

A Lib Dem parliamentary candidate who called for Boris Johnson and other top ministers to be h[anged], drawn and quartered before being burned at the stake, has been axed by Jo Swinson.

Galen Milne – who was due to stand in the Scottish seat of Banff and Buchan – made the comments on Facebook, where he also called Tory MPs “rats” and advocated a “final solution” to split the Tory Party.

Taking the graphic comments in his stride, earlier Jacob Rees-Mogg Tweeted:

True! Being hanged, drawn and quartered was for plebs.

For more information …

Be afraid. Be very afraid.

There was a time when I really admired Prince Harry, despite some of his party scandals.

The Prince Harry of active British Army service and of the Invictus Games has been replaced by one of snobbishness and environmentalism.

Has marriage changed him or was this always in the back of his mind?

His interview with Jane Goodall, doyenne of primatologists, has just appeared in the September 2019 edition of British Vogue. His wife, Meghan — the Duchess of Sussex — guest edited this edition of the magazine.

The Duke of Sussex — Prince Harry — spoke of his love of nature and the environment. Prince Harry’s dialogue is in bold. Jane Goodall’s is in normal print:

… I think, weirdly, because of the people that I’ve met and the places that I’ve been fortunate enough to go to, I’ve always had a connection and a love for nature. I view it differently now, without question. But I’ve always wanted to try and ensure that, even before having a child and hoping to have children…

Not too many! [Laughs]

Two, maximum! But I’ve always thought: this place is borrowed. And, surely, being as intelligent as we all are, or as evolved as we all are supposed to be, we should be able to leave something better behind for the next generation.

But, in fact, we’ve stolen their future. Not all of it. But we’ve got to try and pay a little of it back. And get together to try and heal some of the harm, and at least slow down climate change.

The New York Post‘s Page Six picked up on the interview and Harry’s perspective (emphases mine):

Harry’s outlook on family is a stark contrast to his brother — and to the royal matriarch, Queen Elizabeth II.

Prince William and his wife Kate Middleton already have three kids: Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.

The Queen has four children, although all of her kids only have two.

In his interview with the conservationist, the prince also brought up racism and “unconscious bias,” saying some people don’t realize their own prejudices are inherited …

The prince has previously criticized British tabloid coverage of his former TV-actress wife, whose mother is African-American and whose father is white, as having racist overtones.

I thought so, too. This video compilation of headlines and reporters’ text messages is a fine example.

However, I’m highly disappointed in both of them, should the following story turn out to be true. On Saturday, July 27, the New York Post‘s Page Six reported on a story in The Sun that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex do not want any communications with their neighbours on the Windsor estate. The couple live in the highly expensive Frogmore House, which the Queen had refurbished for them:

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are off to a rough start with their new neighbors.

Handlers warned people living near the royal couple not to talk to the pair, pet their dogs or ask about baby Archie, among other “over the top” rules, according to a report.

Locals at the couple’s Frogmore Cottage home on the Windsor estate are also prohibited from offering neighborly favors, such as babysitting or dogwalking, The Sun reported.

Pleasantries — specifically “good morning” — are banned, and commoners are forbidden from placing letters in the royal mailbox.

“It’s extraordinary. We’ve never heard anything like it. Everyone who lives on the estate works for the royals and knows how to behave respectfully,” one resident scoffed. “We aren’t told how to behave around the Queen like this. She’s very happy for people to greet her.”

“An overly protective palace official” issued the royal commandments at a recent meeting for residents, The Sun reported. It’s unclear how locals who break the rules will be punished.

The Sun had more:

The astonishing “do and don’t commandments” were issued at a residents’ meeting.

One local said: “It would be funny if it wasn’t so over the top.”

Narked neighbours ordered not to talk to Harry and Meghan said last night: “Even the Queen doesn’t demand this.”

Also:

The warnings were made at a recent residents’ meeting where the issue of the Sussexes’ move to the private Home Park estate was raised.

Royal commentator Ingrid Seward said: “It sounds as if Harry and Meghan’s ­incessant demands for privacy means that palace officials are second-guessing what they might want.

“It’s odd because it’s just good manners to engage your neighbour in conversation in a pleasant way. It’s a very normal British thing to say ‘Good Morning’ and pat a dog.

The Queen always chats to neighbours and even has tea with people on the estate as she’s very friendly with them. The ‘not petting the dog’ is particularly strange.

“Maybe Harry doesn’t want people approaching them and using their dogs as an excuse to talk. And of course the dog with no name keeps its privacy as they won’t tell us its name!

Meghan brought rescue beagle Guy over to the UK from Canada, then she and Harry got a black labrador last September.

They have always refused to reveal her name, even when asked by well-wishers.

Bizarre, and not the level of behaviour expected of a member of the Royal Family.

Harry was raised by his father and late mother to behave better than this.

If Palace officials are ‘second-guessing’ what the couple might want, as Ingrid Seward said, then the Duke and Duchess should tell the residents’ association that there was a mistake and that, of course, they are happy to get to know their neighbours.

Not a lot of people outside the UK realise that these grand country estates — including those of nobility — house employees and their families. The Sun‘s article states:

Around 400 people live in the private Home Park and Great Park area of Windsor, which is run by the Crown Estate.

They include the Queen’s right-hand woman and dresser Angela Kelly, Prince Charles’ old nanny Mabel Anderson and the governor of Windsor Castle.

You do not treat employees like dirt, especially when they are your grandmother’s and father’s.

About 20 years ago, there were two BBC series about the Duke and Duchess of Bedford of Woburn Abbey. The first series featured the elder Duke and Duchess handing over the estate to their son, and the second series featured the current Duke and Duchess running the estate and bringing up their first child. It was shown on PBS in the United States.

I mention this because the one of the first things that the family said — and repeated often — was the importance of the relationship between them and their employees who lived and worked on the estate.

I was amazed at how close they were — and are — to their employees. They held holiday celebrations in Woburn Abbey, which, by the way, is open to the public. They made visits to their employees’ cottages in times of loss or illness. The programmes were a joy to watch.

Therefore, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are not behaving in a ducal way at all.

Dukes are said to be among the kindest men in the Realm. They can suffer insufferable bores quite readily, making said bores feel very comfortable indeed. Dukes have a kind word for everyone. They are also very helpful, reaching out to others in need.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex would do well to remember that British taxpayers subsidised the refurbishment of their home, Frogmore Cottage, to the tune of £2.4m! Granted, the couple did pay for the fixtures and fittings, however, the point still stands.

This was such an outrageous amount of money that there was a call for a parliamentary enquiry on June 25. Although the Royal Family’s Sovereign Grant costs only 74p per year per UK resident:

Republic, which campaigns for an elected head of state, questioned why £2.4 million of taxpayers’ money had been “thrown” at Meghan and Harry’s Frogmore Cottage residence while public services were under financial pressure …

The annual royal accounts were released on Monday and, at a press briefing, Sir Michael Stevens, Keeper of the Privy Purse, who is responsible for monarchy’s accounts, gave details of the Sovereign Grant, the funding used to pay for the Queen’s official duties and areas like royal travel, salaries and the upkeep of occupied royal palaces.

Sir Michael said of Frogmore Cottage: “The property had not been the subject of work for some years and had already been earmarked for renovation in line with our responsibility to maintain the condition of the occupied royal palaces estate.

“The Sovereign Grant covered the work undertaken to turn the building into the official residence and home of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex and their new family.

That same day, another report appeared stating that Prince Charles’s expenditures had continued to increase over the last year. The Press Association reported:

Charles pays for the public duties of Harry and Meghan and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and some of their private costs, out of his multimillion pound Duchy of Cornwall income.

Royal accounts showed that the prince’s bill for the Sussexes’ and the Cambridges’ activities, plus other expenditure including Charles’s capital expenditure and transfer to reserves, was £5.05 million in 2018-2019, up 1.8% or £89,000 from £4.96 million in 2017-2018.

Over two years, the figure has risen more than £1.5 million from £3.5 million in 2016-2017.

In the year Harry and Meghan married, Charles’s non-official expenditure increased by £155,000, up 5.2% to £3.16 million.

Clarence House’s annual report provides no detailed breakdown of the funding for the activities of the Sussexes and the Cambridges, with royal sources saying the details were private.

The prince contributed to the Sussexes’ wedding and hosted Harry and Meghan’s evening wedding reception at Frogmore House, where the newlyweds enjoyed a spectacular firework display and partied until 3am with celebrity guests.

A royal source said: “Their expenditure is met by help from their father or things that they would pay for themselves from their private expenditure.”

In closing, I wish the Sussexes well, but they would do well to remember on which side their bread is buttered.

Public sentiment, particularly in Britain, is a fickle thing. And, when the public decides you’re out of bounds, you’re out, often for good.

On June 29 and 30, 2019, a new era dawned for baseball — in London.

The first Major League rivalry games, featuring the New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox, the 2018 World Series winners, took place during London Series 19 at London Stadium in the East End.

The number 19 represents 2019.

Tickets went on sale late last year. They were incredibly expensive, starting at over £100 apiece. Not surprisingly, we decided to watch it from home:

London Stadium was built for the capital’s 2012 Olympics. The opening and closing ceremonies took place there. For the games themselves, it was the athletics stadium, the scene of so many marvellous medal-winning achievements for both Olympians and Paralympians.

Today, the stadium is West Ham United’s home ground.

A lot of hard work by thousands of men and women behind the scenes to temporarily transform a football (soccer) pitch into a baseball field. This was also an international effort. The turf came from France. Other parts of the field came from Canada. The various elements can, everyone hopes, be stored away for next summer’s London Series.

This is what the stadium looked like:

The venue attracted fans from all over Europe — and the United States:

The stadium was nearly filled to capacity — 60,000 — on both days. It was a joy to watch at home:

Despite the breathtaking stadium, its design and location had a strange effect for batters, pitchers and those in the field. Foul territory was double that of a normal ballpark. There was a certain drag on the balls once in air. This produced a lot of home runs, pitches that didn’t go quite to plan and a lot more running by those in the outfield. The commentators said that scientists attended both games to study exactly why this was happening, as the drag is much different to the usual.

The sunlight was also a major problem. The stadium had a huge black screen on the wall behind second base. That was so the batter could see an aiming point. Yet, as the commentators showed us on both days of play, from certain angles, the sun rendered that white, too.

On Saturday, the first game opened with the national anthems of both the UK and the US:

Then, it was time to play ball!

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex — Prince Harry and Meghan — threw the first pitch. They’re avowed Yankees fans, as you can probably tell from their attire:

This was the lineup:

Incredibly, at the end of the first inning, the score was 6-6!

Saturday’s final score was an unusual 17-13. The Yankees had won:

A fireworks display took place afterwards:

This was a first not only for the Yankees, but any MLB team:

Sunday’s action took place in the afternoon.

BoSox fans were hopeful, especially with their lead of 4-2 by the second inning. This chap had a hat in each camp, so to speak. Worth watching:

Fans were told on both days that they could keep any balls that reached the stands. This happened a lot:

Then, at the top of the 7th, doom struck. Three BoSox pitchers in that inning could not stave off the Yankees:

Boston’s Alex Cora already knew that he will have to dramatically improve his bullpen when trading for the 2020 season starts in July. He needs much stronger pitchers overall.

Cora has already told his star batters that they will have to play more offensively when on the field. Mookie Betts has been taking that advice on board and is beginning to play more aggressively, anticipating opponents’ moves and strategies.

Sunday’s final score was another rout for the BoSox, unfortunately:

Next year, our other favourite rivalry will battle it out in London Series 20:

Representatives from the Chicago Cubs and the St Louis Cardinals came here to watch this year’s games.

They can hardly wait for 2020! Nor can we!

Special thanks go to MLB, Mitel and other sponsors for making the London Series possible. THANK YOU!

Thanks to my two readers, Mary Ann and CherryPie, who commented on my Alzheimer’s ‘train ride’ post this week.

Both ladies suggested that diet could help alleviate Alzheimer’s symptoms. An Englishman, Mark Hatzer, experienced excellent results with his ailing mother.

I do think there is some truth in it, but, as the Alzheimer’s Society states at the end of the article about the Hatzers (emphases mine):

Adopting a healthy lifestyle can help people with dementia to manage their symptoms, but there is no strong evidence that these steps will slow or stop the underlying diseases that cause dementia.

I also know Alzheimer’s patients who have since gone to their eternal rest who did all the right things and still got the disease!

They socialised, they went to church, they walked, they read and they did puzzles.

This is from Mark Hatzer’s advice list from the aforementioned Alzheimer’s Society article on him and his mother:

Doing any, all or some of those does not guarantee warding off Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia.

I know from experience.

Most of the employees at The Restaurant That Makes Mistakes had responsible jobs and were cut off in their prime because of early-onset forms of dementia.

I congratulate Mr Hatzer and his mother. He lives with her and has been able to spend his time outside of work helping her over the past few years.

My point is not to expect too much from the standard Alzheimer’s/dementia advice.

In closing, one of the reasons we could be seeing an increase in these diseases of the brain is our modern propensity to eat a carbohydrate-rich diet. I would second Mr Hatzer’s recommendation about eating lots of fresh leafy vegetables and those rich in beta carotene.

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump were in England and Normandy for commemorations of the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

The night before, he hosted Prince Charles and Camilla the Duchess of Cornwall for dinner at the US ambassador’s residence in Regent’s Park, London. The guests at his table were also in Portsmouth the following morning. Theresa May is on the right in the photo:

On Wednesday, June 5, the Royal Family’s Twitter account summarised D-Day’s importance:

Also:

The Allied landings on the Normandy beaches marked the start of a long and costly campaign to liberate north-west Europe from German occupation.

This was the scene in Portsmouth, on England’s south coast that day:

A short time later, veterans who had been involved 75 years ago began taking their seats:

The Queen, who served as a mechanic during the war, arrived:

This is a photograph for the history books:

Warm exchanges took place beforehand:

The Queen stood between Prince Charles and President Trump to watch the proceedings:

She addressed the crowd, referencing her father, George VI:

President Trump read then-President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s prayer for the troops:

D-Day veterans appeared on the dais to grateful applause.

Actress Celia Imrie (speaking in the next video) compered (emceed) the various performances:

The following ABC News video has the Portsmouth commemorations in their entirety:

The BBC has a set of photographs covering the day’s events.

Afterwards, the Queen, Prince Charles and the Trumps met with veterans who so bravely served in D-Day operations:

Trump also met with British veterans as well as US Navy personnel based in England:

The Queen then bade farewell to the Trumps, who were leaving for Ireland, where the president met with the prime minister there that afternoon:

The Trumps went to Normandy the following day for D-Day ceremonies before returning to Ireland, then onwards to the United States.

The Q Tree has the Trumps’ schedule after Portsmouth for the rest of June 5 (emphasis in the original):

2:50pm BST / 9:50am EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Southsea Commons en route to Southsea Castle Landing Zone, Portsmouth, United Kingdom

2:55pm BST / 9:55am EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive at Southsea Castle Landing Zone, Portsmouth, United Kingdom

3:05pm BST / 10:05am EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Portsmouth, United Kingdom, en route to Southampton Airport, Southampton, United Kingdom, Portsmouth, United Kingdom

3:25pm BST / 10:25am EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive at Southampton Airport, Southampton, United Kingdom

3:35pm BST / 10:35am EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Southampton Airport en route Shannon Airport, Shannon, Ireland, Southampton, United Kingdom

U.K State Visit Concludes ~

4:50pm IST / 11:50am EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive at Shannon Airport, Shannon, Ireland

5:00pm IST / 12:00pm EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Shannon Airport en route to Shannon Airport Terminal, Shannon, Ireland

5:05pm IST / 12:05pm EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive at Shannon Airport Terminal, Shannon, Ireland

5:15pm IST / 12:15pm EST THE PRESIDENT participates in a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Taoiseach Leo Varadkar of Ireland, Shannon, Ireland

5:20pm IST / 12:20pm EST THE PRESIDENT participates in an expanded bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Taoiseach Leo Varadkar of Ireland, Shannon, Ireland

6:00PM IST / 1:00pm EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Shannon Airport Terminal en route to Shannon Airport, Shannon, Ireland

6:05pm IST / 1:05PM EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive at Shannon Airport, Shannon, Ireland

6:15pm IST / 1:15pm EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Shannon, Airport, en route to Trump International Doonbeg Landing Zone, Doonbeg, Ireland, Shannon, Ireland

6:35pm IST / 1:35pm EST THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive at Trump International Doonbeg Landing Zone, Doonbeg, Ireland

The Clare Champion featured their arrival:

At the end of Tuesday, Trump tweeted:

He and his entourage would fly from Ireland to Colleville-sur-Mer in the département of Calvados of Normandy the following morning.

Speaking of Normandy, two British veterans were preparing to re-enact their jumps from 1944. Here is one of them undergoing a refresher course:

This is what happened on Wednesday, June 6:

This is what the Trumps saw as they landed in France that morning:

The following is an excerpt of President Trump’s speech on Omaha Beach:

The Q Tree has his speech in full on Omaha Beach, excerpted below (emphases mine). More than 60 surviving American D-Day veterans flew to France for this important anniversary. Many more Second World War military survivors also attended:

President Macron, Mrs. Macron, and the people of France; to the First Lady of the United States and members of the United States Congress; to distinguished guests, veterans, and my fellow Americans:

We are gathered here on Freedom’s Altar. On these shores, on these bluffs, on this day 75 years ago, 10,000 men shed their blood, and thousands sacrificed their lives, for their brothers, for their countries, and for the survival of liberty.

Today, we remember those who fell, and we honor all who fought right here in Normandy. They won back this ground for civilization.

To more than 170 veterans of the Second World War who join us today: You are among the very greatest Americans who will ever live. You’re the pride of our nation. You are the glory of our republic. And we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

Here with you are over 60 veterans who landed on D-Day. Our debt to you is everlasting. Today, we express our undying gratitude.

When you were young, these men enlisted their lives in a Great Crusade — one of the greatest of all times. Their mission is the story of an epic battle and the ferocious, eternal struggle between good and evil.

On the 6th of June, 1944, they joined a liberation force of awesome power and breathtaking scale. After months of planning, the Allies had chosen this ancient coastline to mount their campaign to vanquish the wicked tyranny of the Nazi empire from the face of the Earth.

The battle began in the skies above us. In those first tense midnight hours, 1,000 aircraft roared overhead with 17,000 Allied airborne troops preparing to leap into the darkness beyond these trees.

Then came dawn. The enemy who had occupied these heights saw the largest naval armada in the history of the world. Just a few miles offshore were 7,000 vessels bearing 130,000 warriors. They were the citizens of free and independent nations, united by their duty to their compatriots and to millions yet unborn.

There were the British, whose nobility and fortitude saw them through the worst of Dunkirk and the London Blitz. The full violence of Nazi fury was no match for the full grandeur of British pride.

There were the Canadians, whose robust sense of honor and loyalty compelled them to take up arms alongside Britain from the very, very beginning.

There were the fighting Poles, the tough Norwegians, and the intrepid Aussies. There were the gallant French commandos, soon to be met by thousands of their brave countrymen ready to write a new chapter in the long history of French valor.

And, finally, there were the Americans. They came from the farms of a vast heartland, the streets of glowing cities, and the forges of mighty industrial towns. Before the war, many had never ventured beyond their own community. Now they had come to offer their lives half a world from home.

This beach, codenamed Omaha, was defended by the Nazis with monstrous firepower, thousands and thousands of mines and spikes driven into the sand, so deeply. It was here that tens of thousands of the Americans came

One of those men in [Colonel George] Taylor’s 16th Regiment was Army medic Ray Lambert. Ray was only 23, but he had already earned three Purple Hearts and two Silver Stars fighting in North Africa and Sicily, where he and his brother Bill, no longer with us, served side by side.

In the early morning hours, the two brothers stood together on the deck of the USS Henrico, before boarding two separate Higgins landing craft. “If I don’t make it,” Bill said, “please, please take care of my family.” Ray asked his brother to do the same.

Of the 31 men on Ray’s landing craft, only Ray and 6 others made it to the beach. There were only a few of them left. They came to the sector right here below us. “Easy Red” it was called. Again and again, Ray ran back into the water. He dragged out one man after another. He was shot through the arm. His leg was ripped open by shrapnel. His back was broken. He nearly drowned.

He had been on the beach for hours, bleeding and saving lives, when he finally lost consciousness. He woke up the next day on a cot beside another badly wounded soldier. He looked over and saw his brother Bill. They made it. They made it. They made it.

At 98 years old, Ray is here with us today, with his fourth Purple Heart and his third Silver Star from Omaha. Ray, the free world salutes you. Thank you, Ray.

Trump related a few more real life stories about what is known as the Longest Day, unimaginably harrowing. God was with the Allied troops.

Trump concluded:

The men behind me will tell you that they are just the lucky ones. As one of them recently put it, “All the heroes are buried here.” But we know what these men did. We knew how brave they were. They came here and saved freedom, and then, they went home and showed us all what freedom is all about.

The American sons and daughters who saw us to victory were no less extraordinary in peace. They built families. They built industries. They built a national culture that inspired the entire world. In the decades that followed, America defeated communism, secured civil rights, revolutionized science, launched a man to the moon, and then kept on pushing to new frontiers. And, today, America is stronger than ever before.

Seven decades ago, the warriors of D-Day fought a sinister enemy who spoke of a thousand-year empire. In defeating that evil, they left a legacy that will last not only for a thousand years, but for all time — for as long as the soul knows of duty and honor; for as long as freedom keeps its hold on the human heart.

To the men who sit behind me, and to the boys who rest in the field before me, your example will never, ever grow old. Your legend will never tire. Your spirit — brave, unyielding, and true — will never die.

The blood that they spilled, the tears that they shed, the lives that they gave, the sacrifice that they made, did not just win a battle. It did not just win a war. Those who fought here won a future for our nation. They won the survival of our civilization. And they showed us the way to love, cherish, and defend our way of life for many centuries to come.

Today, as we stand together upon this sacred Earth, we pledge that our nations will forever be strong and united. We will forever be together. Our people will forever be bold. Our hearts will forever be loyal. And our children, and their children, will forever and always be free.

May God bless our great veterans. May God bless our Allies. May God bless the heroes of D-Day. And may God bless America.

The Q Tree has full coverage, including this 90-minute video of the day’s commemorations:

This is NBC’s video, which begins with an analysis of D-Day:

French president Emmanuel Macron also addressed the American veterans. I was in France at the time and watched part of his speech on BFMTV. It was highly evocative and really captured the idea of Americana. Whoever wrote it should get a pay rise. I was very moved by it. He spoke, as did Trump, of young soldiers from farms in the Midwest mixing with their comrades from Manhattan and New Jersey, writing their girlfriends farewell letters.

Afterwards, Macron shook hands with all the veterans and spoke with each individually. I’m not a Macron fan at all, but I have to give him credit for that.

Trump tweeted a short video recapping his day in Normandy:

This is the view of the Trumps’ departure, returning to Ireland before flying back to Washington:

Reflecting on D-Day, someone online posted this excellent graphic from Gab:

We should be so grateful for everything that God has given us — especially peace and freedom in the Western world.

However, it would also be prudent to look at how we have squandered the opportunities for our young people in peacetime. The safe space generation is not equipped to deal with the horrors of life such as it is.

May the good Lord grant us the wisdom to get us out of a navel-gazing attitude towards one of genuine progress and ingenuity, such as that of the post-war years.

In closing, let us give thanks to the Greatest Generation for their immense courage and bravery.

On Monday, June 3, 2019, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump arrived in London for a three-day State Visit:

The Daily Mail has a full itinerary of the trip.

The president’s adult children accompanied them, along with Cabinet members and senior staff.

America’s first couple stayed at the US ambassador’s residence in Regent’s Park, Winfield House. The Trump offspring stayed at the Corinthia Hotel in central London.

Monday was packed with events for the Trumps. This video recaps the day, which began by landing at Winfield House, meeting the Queen for lunch at Buckingham Palace, taking tea as guests of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall at Clarence House and being the guests of honour at a State Dinner at the palace:

I was out of the country at the time and wanted to have a record of his trip by posting about it here. I am not sure how much made the media outlets and how it was reported.

One thing that did surprise me — and my better half, who is English — was that the president spoke with the honour guard as he was inspecting them. Both of us were shocked. This is a no-no. Then, Prince Charles did the same. See a brief glimpse at 11:40:

France’s BFMTV showed much more of Trump’s talking to the honour guard. The French commentators were equally surprised.

Meanwhile, the Queen, her daughter-in-law Camilla Duchess of Cornwall and Mrs Trump enjoyed a light moment:

Afterwards, the Queen hosted a private lunch and showed the Trumps various items and documents from the Royal Collection pertaining to the United States.

Then it was time to go to Westminster Abbey. The Duke of York — Prince Andrew — accompanied the Trumps, who received a tour of the Abbey from clergy and placed a wreath at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Despite its title, the video below does not include tea with Prince Charles but does have extensive coverage from the visit to Westminster Abbey:

 

The State Banquet took place that evening:

Protests took place outside the palace, but guests were undisturbed:

As one would imagine, much preparation went into this dinner:

This is what the ballroom looked like as the Queen’s guests filed in:

Sarah Sanders, who also accompanied the Trumps on their 2018 visit to Windsor Castle, will have another lovely memory of her time as press secretary:

At the State Banquet, the president remembered the events of D-Day and those who bravely fought for freedom:

He also made another faux pas. Like Michelle Obama, he touched the Queen. Unlike Michelle Obama, he did it twice. The Daily Mail reported (emphases mine):

The Special Relationship between Britain and the United States was reaffirmed last night with moving toasts in the Buckingham Palace ballroom as Donald Trump clinked glasses with the Queen and patted her shoulder having called her a ‘great, great woman’.

Amid the splendour and ceremony of a state banquet for 170 dignitaries and guests, the US President thanked the monarch for her ‘gracious hospitality’ and ‘nearly seven decades’ of personal friendship with the United States.

He spoke of the Blitz and the bombing of Buckingham Palace, saying that ‘in their dark hour the people of this nation showed the world what it means to be British’.

He praised the Queen a ‘great, great woman’ recalling her service on the Home Front during the war, and said ‘the bond between our nations was forever sealed in that great crusade’.

He said the Queen embodied ‘the spirit of dignity, duty, and patriotism that beats proudly in every British heart’.

Raising his glass the 45th President of the United States said: ‘On behalf of all Americans, I offer a toast to the eternal friendship of our people, the vitality of our nations and to the long cherished and truly remarkable reign of Her Majesty, the Queen.’

Shortly before retaking his seat Mr Trump appeared briefly to breach royal protocol by placing his hand on the Queen’s back in a gesture of personal thanks. By tradition the Queen should not be touched, but the President’s host seemed unperturbed following his warm personal toast.

In her address, the Queen welcomed the Trumps, celebrated the Special Relationship between the UK and the US, and while Brexit was not mentioned she highlighted how the two countries faced ‘new challenges of the 21st century’. 

The article includes a brilliant set of photos, by the way.

Here is another terrific photograph:

The Queen’s remarks followed:

Mr President,

I am delighted to welcome you and Mrs Trump to Buckingham Palace this evening, just twelve months after our first meeting at Windsor Castle. Visits by American Presidents always remind us of the close and longstanding friendship between the United Kingdom and the United States, and I am so glad that we have another opportunity to demonstrate the immense importance that both our countries attach to our relationship.

In the coming days, you will see some of our most treasured historical buildings, speak to the business leaders whose expertise and innovation drive our economies, and meet members of our Armed Services, past and present. You will also travel to Portsmouth and Normandy to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of D-Day.

On that day – and on many occasions since – the Armed Forces of both our countries fought side-by-side to defend our cherished values of liberty and democracy. Mr President, in your State of the Union Address this year, you paid tribute to some of the American heroes who risked their lives, and we owe an immeasurable debt to the British, American and Allied soldiers who began the liberation of Europe on 6th June 1944.

I paid my first State Visit to your country at the invitation of President Eisenhower. As Supreme Allied Commander, he had ultimate responsibility for the execution of the Normandy landings. In his headquarters in St James’s Square – not far from Buckingham Palace – British and American officers worked closely together to plan the freedom of a continent, and it would be no exaggeration to say that millions of lives depended on their common endeavour.

As we face the new challenges of the Twenty First Century, the anniversary of D-Day reminds us of all that our countries have achieved together. After the shared sacrifices of the Second World War, Britain and the United States worked with other allies to build an assembly of international institutions, to ensure that the horrors of conflict would never be repeated. While the world has changed, we are forever mindful of the original purpose of these structures: nations working together to safeguard a hard won peace

Mr President, as we look to the future, I am confident that our common values and shared interests will continue to unite us. Tonight we celebrate an alliance that has helped to ensure the safety and prosperity of both our peoples for decades, and which I believe will endure for many years to come

The Queen then proposed a toast:

At the end of the day, Trump tweeted:

Protests did take place around the country, but a crowd of well wishers was on hand in front of Buckingham Palace to greet him.

Events on Tuesday, June 4 involved talks about trade:

More protests took place in London:

Interestingly, Prime Minister Theresa May and President Trump did not shake hands when he and his wife arrived:

The Trumps received a tour of No. 10:

Mrs Trump was with Mr May during the meeting between the president and our outgoing Prime Minister:

Here are clips from the May-Trump press conference:

Meanwhile, a British woman burst the Trump baby balloon. Great news, even if she was arrested:

The Gateway Pundit reported:

“I’m going in..I’m going,” the woman says as she walked up to the baby Trump blimp.

The woman then stabbed the blimp with a pen and a small popping sound is heard followed by gasps from onlookers.

The woman screamed “It’s a national a disgrace! The President of the United States is the best President ever! Shame on you!” after she popped the balloon.

Police quickly moved in for the arrest as the woman walked away.

“It’s going down baby,” the woman said as police approached her and cuffed her.

The woman, whose hand was bleeding, had a fiery exchange with the police and pleaded for them to stop manhandling her.

That evening, the Trumps hosted a dinner for Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall at Winfield House:

The Daily Caller has more photos.

It should be noted that the Trumps did not experience all the trappings of a full State Visit, which includes staying at a royal residence and addressing either house of Parliament.

The Washington Examiner explained:

… royal watchers said the Trumps will be missing out on many of the trappings of a state visit, such as staying at Buckingham Palace. “Not being invited to speak before Parliament is testament to the fact they know he is going to be rude and there’s going to be massive protests,” said Marlene Koenig, an author and expert on British and European royalty.

“They are doing the bare minimum of what they would do for a state visit of a major ally.”

Several honors afforded visiting American presidents or other heads of state will be missing.

He will not get the usual welcome in Horse Guards Parade, the grand parade ground in central London where visiting heads of state are usually invited to inspect the honor guard with the queen before a carriage procession to Buckingham Palace.

Instead, he will follow the example of President George W. Bush, who was given his royal welcome in the garden of Buckingham Palace in 2003 because of fears protesters would line the route through London

Trump will not get to stay at Buckingham Palace with the Queen. Both Bush and Obama, the only two American presidents to have been granted official state visits, stayed at the royal residence, but Trump has been told that renovations to the east wing of the palace meant its guest rooms were out of service

The run-up to this visit featured speculation about whether Trump would be invited to address the British Parliament.

In the end, the speaker — the figure who presides over the House of Commons and who had previously said Trump’s attendance would run counter to Parliament’s longstanding opposition to sexism and racism — said he had not been asked by British officials to host the president. Presidents Obama, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton all addressed Parliament.

A U.K. official said Trump had not requested to address Parliament. “The president not asking to do that is the norm,” he said. On both sides of the Atlantic, a mutually-convenient cover story of Trump not being asked to be invited in order to avoid being told he will not be invited appears to have been adopted

Previous visits have sometimes reflected the warm relations between individual leaders.

In 1982 the queen invited Ronald Reagan to stay with her at Windsor Castle and took him horse riding. A decade late, Bill and Hillary Clinton were treated to a night aboard the royal yacht Britannia.

And in 2011, Obama grilled sausages with David Cameron in the garden of Number 10 during an event for British and American service personnel.

That said, in summing up his stay in the UK, Trump tweeted:

I will cover the president’s attendance at D-Day commemorations in Portsmouth and in Normandy in tomorrow’s post.

In the coming days, I hope to have time to post on President Trump’s recent trips to Japan, the United Kingdom, Ireland and France.

For now, here is an interesting conversation wherein British Trump supporters talk about the Left and media manipulation:

In case the tweet gets censored, this is what the black supporter says:

The left say I shouldn’t exist, if you’re a particular person you should vote a particular way. That’s why they’re going to lose again to Trump in 2020.

Good man. The other men seem to be from Northern Ireland. They all understand what is going on.

Having been out of the country at the time, I was heartened to see that a great crowd of supporters, like these gentlemen, welcomed the American president to London. They were along The Mall, which leads to Buckingham Palace, and in front of the palace itself:

I would love to hear what these good people have to say about Brexit!

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